What should the yield be after a 3 - 4 day bone-stock simmer?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by Robbie Daug, Dec 20, 2018.

  1. Robbie Daug

    Robbie Daug

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    Hi all,

    I, recently, started making bone stock at home for the collagen only. When it's done, i flavor the portions as i use it. So i am not interested in discussing added flavoring, in this thread,
    just the bones (and the fat attached)

    I've been using 2kg beef bones, with bits of meat and fat attached, in a large pot of water. I am able to cover the bones with water about 4 times (in the pot).
    I acid/water soak the bones for about 20 mins, then bring them to a boil from cold water.
    I skim and skim.
    It simmers for three to four days as i top it off with boiling water as it simmers.
    By day three, i am removing the bones to cut them up,
    A final skim.

    How stock should i be yielding?

    Thanks
     
  2. Robbie Daug

    Robbie Daug

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    Oops. I mean, "how MUCH stock should i be yielding?"
    .
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I would say about 2 quarts.
     
  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I don't think you want any fat attached that is easy to remove, fat is just a flavor sucker here.
     
  5. Robbie Daug

    Robbie Daug

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    I think the fat will rise when refrigerated so it can be removed.
     
  6. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Good god, the fuel cost must be incredible! Can I suggest that you do this with a pressure cooker, for 10-12 hours on high pressure? The bones will be so stripped of collagen they'll be like paste, the stock will be easy to strain and separate, and it's just an overnight job.
     
  7. maryb

    maryb

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    Or at least cover the pot... boiling away the water serves no purpose until you want to reduce the stock.
     
  8. Robbie Daug

    Robbie Daug

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    Hi maryb and chrislehrer,

    All i am concerned about here is my yield.

    To make you even more amazed, in my apartment kitchen, there is no fan/hood. So, i won't simmer or boil liquid for too long as the condensation is bad for everything - considering where my kitchenette is in my apartment.

    So, i use an electric hot plate on my balcony. By the way, it's winter in my city (Montreal) and my balcony temperature is anywhere between -10 degrees C to -20 C. So just imagine the electricity needed to keep a LARGE uncovered pot of water and bones boiling all night and day.
    My hot plate has only three fixed temperatures, min, med, and high. I have to use the high setting, otherwise, it's just not hot enough.
    See?...where i live, in my building (which is city housing) my electricity is not expensive. I pay something like $45.00 per month for heating, hot water and lighting etc.

    "There is no purpose in boiling "away" water." ?
    Of course there is, maryb. The purpose is called making a stock. Can't make stock in cold water. It's only natural that boiled water will evaporate.
    I don't own a pressure cooker so i use the stove or a hot plate.
    I don't own a food processor, either, and i chop and slice much more than i should be doing. I'd rather buy a food processor before a pressure cooker. Besides, i make larger than normal amounts and i freeze portions.
    For my last stock, which was finished yesterday, i used 5.2 Kg (11 lbs) of beef bones. I am not sure a pressure cooker can handle 5.2 Kg of bones at one time.
     
  9. Robbie Daug

    Robbie Daug

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    Thanks, Kuan, for your comment.
     
  10. french fries

    french fries

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    Yeah, screw the earth. I want my yield.
     
  11. Robbie Daug

    Robbie Daug

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    Hi french fries,

    Can you explain to me, please, when i make a bone stock how i am "screwing the Earth"?
     
  12. maryb

    maryb

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    My point was why boil off water to have to add more boiling water during the long bone cook period. There is nothing to be gained by doing it that way. Cover the pot, keep more of the water in and let it do its thing. When read to remove the bones and reduce to your taste THEN uncover and simmer off the excess liquid. You will use less electricity because a covered pot takes less energy to keep at a boil.
     
    chrislehrer likes this.
  13. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    To add to the point made by @maryb : if you want more yield, stop boiling away your yield!
     
  14. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I boiled lamb bones for about 2 days, added water 2 or 3 times, all by accidentally letting it go "too long." It was covered, heat low, but I had a wash cloth over the lid and towel wrapped around the crock pot for energy efficiency (save the earth, ya), so some but very low flow of steam. Best darn lamb stock I ever made to that point. Once I finally got the bones out I reduced to half, super-concentrated beautiful lamb flavor. I believe these were mostly neck bones fwiw.