What jobs pay the most and what schools are the best?

I want a resturant. Is it good to go to a business school before a cullinary school?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes because you get more knowlege about starting a resturant

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
  • Poll closed .
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Joined Mar 18, 2002


:confused: HELP! I have been wanting to know for a while what types of jobs pay the most money in the culinary feild. Also, what types of schools are good to go to and what can i benifit from going to a private school? I love to cook and i want ot own my own resturaunt, so if you have any information for me please share it! thanks very much!:chef:
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
NOTHING pays much in the "culinary field." Unless you are a big-name chef. Or an owner who has learned how to squeeze everything out of your staff and suppliers and customers.

(Remember that this industry still operates on models from 2 centuries ago, and on the military model, which is not exactly the most up-to-date, either.)

If you are a female, you will be offered Garde Manger or Pastry Plating. If you are male, and have no schooling you might be offered prep, or possibly line cook. (Since you [Cristy] can speak English, you will be offered something higher than someone who does not speak English. They tend to be considered less than standard, no matter what their background is.)

If you love to cook and want to own your own restaurant, let me tell you that those two are incompatible. Just read the posts here, and on many other sites.

Sorry to be so negative, but ....
 
846
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Joined Nov 29, 2001
Owning a restaurant might not be the vehicle for you. Perhaps working for someone in their restaurant, a silent partner with deep pockets and a need for notoriety would suit you better.

The restaurant business is less about cooking than it is about ... business. I know I'm much more creative when I work for someone else because I'm concentrating less about numbers flying around my head with dollar signs attached to them.

The best case scenario in restaurant ownership is a partnership. Some people just want the prestige of owning a restaurant and some of them have so much money, it won't be an issue if the thing goes belly up.

If sole ownership still appears to be what you want to do, by all means take business classes in conjunction with your culinary classes. Preferably in the same place...a school that specializes in culinary education and teaches management and business skills as well.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
Wow Suzanne, those were some pretty sweeping accusations! And though that may be the case in many (maybe the majority) of places, it is certainly not true in all of them.
 
5,192
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Joined Jul 28, 2001
Cristy606,
There are negetive sides to everything in life. If this is your dream than I will tell you:
It is very possible to love to cook or bake and own your own business. It's not for everyone. Its very hard work and usually requires an unconditional support system from immediate family and partner. A business background if very helpful if your planning ownership. The step from any educational enviornment to ownership foregoing OTJT is risky at best.
Ownership only caps you creativly if you let it. You don't have to be inhuman to make money as an owner. You might find that hard working owners are enjoying a very comfortable living minus some of the horror stories in print.
Not being contradictory, just did not want to see the wind go out of someones sails to quickly.
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
You're right, Pete. I went a bit overboard. Sorry.

But will you agree that we work in this field because we love it, because it gives us huge amounts of intrinsic satisfaction --NOT because we expect to make a lot of money?

BTW: just thought of another book, written from the OWNERS' perspective, that should be more widely read: Life of a Restaurant by Helen Studley. She owned La Colombe d'Or, a very good Mediterranean restaurant in New York City; an early chef there was Wayne Nish, now considered one of the top chefs in the city. Anyway, it's one of the best books I've read from that view. (And the recipes are great!).

ISBN 0-517-58313-5
 
5,192
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Joined Jul 28, 2001
I have a question. Not directed at anyone, just curious.
I hear almost all the time from people in our industry that the reason they put up with all the negetives is our passion for cooking or baking. low pay, long hours,sh---y bosses, etc.
Do we do it for the passion, or are we always looking for the right thing. The grass always seems greener on the other side until we get there.
Can we compare this to Police, Firefighters and such?We always here they don't do it for the money.
I have a passion for the culinary arts, but I still see it as something that I do to support my family, JOB. I feel lucky because I am compensated for doing something I like. Am I a minority?
 
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Joined Mar 18, 2002
Thanks to everyone who replied to my post. Your replies have really helped me out. I see how it would be complicated to own and work for my own business. Maybe in the end it will work out....hopefully. I just need to get my priorities straight. Thanks again! :p
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
If you want to know about salaries and hourly wages I just came across a really good source. Go to: www.iacp.com

It's "The International Association Of Culinary Professionals". On their first page scroll down find the article about wages, click on that. They explain there are exceptions and coastal cities and larger cities tend to be higher in wages....but all and all it looks exactly like what I've experienced. At least it will give you a realistic look at what industry wages look like.
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
The aritcle I'm referrring to is titled "Are you getting fair market value for your skills?"
 
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Joined Mar 21, 2002
Executive Chefs can make up to $450 000 a year?

Woa...

I had no Idea. I was hoping at best $60 000.

I do not need that much money, $50 000 is enough for me, even that is a lot.

I do not know where I should attend school though... I would like to attend school in Japan, though I really am not sure at all.

:(

*sigh*

I'm not getting any younger and I still don't know what I want to do with myself.

I would like to teach children Martial Arts, and cook in a restaurant for a living... though I do not think I would have time for that.

Bah... finding oneself in the world is perplexing.
 
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