What is your favorite cuisine to cook?

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Just a random opinion question but since moving down South I've found a new love for cooking lots of Southern/soul food and take inspiration when I try new restaurants in my area (Charleston). I just went to one called Braised in the South and they had the most delicious cornbread waffle that I've been trying to perfect among other things! What is your favorite cuisine to cook??
 
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If you are asking about southern cuisine? Seafood Gumbo is my favorite to both eat and cook. But Italian cuisine is my favorite cuisine of all.
 

kuan

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Personally, I like the rigor of making stock, organizing ingredients so I like to butcher my own cuts of meat, fish, peel my potatoes and put them in water, peel my onions, store my herbs, and finishing everything on the stove/oven.
 
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Personally, I like the rigor of making stock, organizing ingredients so I like to butcher my own cuts of meat, fish, peel my potatoes and put them in water, peel my onions, store my herbs, and finishing everything on the stove/oven.
Kuan
Are you in the US?? We have something called canned or boxed stock here which is horrible. It is the go to American stock that most home cooks use, unless we do what you are talking about, which is make your own.

Your version of stock is so much superior. And you can control the salt content and seasonings far better.

It really isn't too difficult, but here in America, the idea of opening a box and instantly making food is the mentality of our way of life.
 
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I first started getting seriously into cooking because boxed stock was so awful. Now I make stock probably every 2-3 weeks depending on the season!
 
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French, Moroccan, Tunisian, Greek, Vietnamese, Thai, Chinese, Mexican, Spanish, Italian, Indian... hard to pick a favorite. I want to learn more Japanese, African, South American.....and to smoke meat the American way.... so much more to learn.
 
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French, Moroccan, Tunisian, Greek, Vietnamese, Thai, Chinese, Mexican, Spanish, Italian, Indian... hard to pick a favorite. I want to learn more Japanese, African, South American.....and to smoke meat the American way.... so much more to learn.
Japanese is easy to start. Get Shizuo Tsuji's book A Simple Art and read. Make a bunch of recipes from the first big section, one or two from each subsection, and you'll get the hang of it. And be sure to let me know if you get stuck!
 
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Japanese is easy to start. Get Shizuo Tsuji's book A Simple Art and read. Make a bunch of recipes from the first big section, one or two from each subsection, and you'll get the hang of it. And be sure to let me know if you get stuck!
Thank you Chris! I trust you so I'm sure it's a great recommendation. I can find used copies going for about 40 Euros around here... bit steep but that's the price for English language books. I see two different ones, one with the fish on the cover, another with several dishes on the cover, is one a newer edition? Do you recommend one over the other? Thanks!
 
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My current favorite is Mexican but that is waning (I’m starting to lean Indian), and my wife’s favorite is Thai. So they are the most common in my house.
However, I like to reach out and search and learn new more so than what I know. In this last monthly cooking challenge, butzy butzy made a Be Sapi Base Manis.(Balinese sweet beef). It intrigued me. Through that and a dive into how to authentically prepare it, I stumbled on to Urab Sayur (Balinese Coconut and Vegetable salad).
Last week, I had no idea that existed. Now, it will be a regular in rotation for a while.
Just like my music, I like my food original.
 
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My favourite is SE Asoan (Indonesian, Thai, Vietnamese, Malay etc).
But, I like to try different dishes/cultures (like planethoff planethoff says...)
Chinese intrigues me, same as Peruvian, Chilean, Lebanese....
There is still so much to learn ;)
 

phatch

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To cook, it's all about the same to me barring specialty equipment.

My favorite to eat is Chinese and related cuisines, and that does influence my shopping and cooking choices.
 
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Thank you Chris! I trust you so I'm sure it's a great recommendation. I can find used copies going for about 40 Euros around here... bit steep but that's the price for English language books. I see two different ones, one with the fish on the cover, another with several dishes on the cover, is one a newer edition? Do you recommend one over the other? Thanks!
Get the cheapest. As far as I can tell -- and I have looked! -- the new edition (with the fish) is simply a reprint with a new (and annoying) forward by Ruth Reichl. The text is the same. They could have made the reprint actually worth something, if they'd reformatted a bit and added color pictures of these dishes presented in a more or less standard Japanese manner, but they didn't bother. As to the forward, I'm no fan of Reichl to begin with, but this one is particularly exoticizing and shallow. (The original forward by MFK Fisher is great, and included in both editions.)

E40 does seem rather expensive for a battered used copy. If it's in reasonably good shape, it's worth it: it is the ONLY Japanese cookbook you really need (assuming you don't read fluent Japanese, in which case I have a bunch of other recommendations; then again, if that were the case, we wouldn't be having this conversation, now would we?).

Once upon a time I wrote a long review essay about Japanese cookbooks here at ChefTalk, but in the transition to the new server/system a lot of that stuff seems to have gone missing. It's out of date now anyway -- but the main point was (and is), you need a copy of Tsuji.
 
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Thank you Chris! I trust you so I'm sure it's a great recommendation. I can find used copies going for about 40 Euros around here... bit steep but that's the price for English language books. I see two different ones, one with the fish on the cover, another with several dishes on the cover, is one a newer edition? Do you recommend one over the other? Thanks!
I'm not Chris, but I have the one with the fish on the cover. I love this book, I've pretty much read through all of it and use it, especially for fish. I'm lucky that there's a lot of authentic Japanese grocery stores around here so it's easy to get even esoteric ingredients,
 
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well not really a cuisine but I really enjoy butchering. Few things can center me and bring me peace like breaking down a few primal cuts, setting up bags and portioning whatever, pressing burgers, peeling shrimp or just plain old grinding meat.
 
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Thank you Chris! I trust you so I'm sure it's a great recommendation. I can find used copies going for about 40 Euros around here... bit steep but that's the price for English language books. I see two different ones, one with the fish on the cover, another with several dishes on the cover, is one a newer edition? Do you recommend one over the other? Thanks!
I know it is a bit off topic, but amazon.de sells it new for under 40 euro, and there is a second hand one for 18.
Shipment cost won't be too bad ;)
 
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I know it is a bit off topic, but amazon.de sells it new for under 40 euro, and there is a second hand one for 18.
Shipment cost won't be too bad ;)
Thanks butzy! I suppose I wasn't fast enough but I can't see a version for 18 Euros unfortunately. Seems like around 36 Euros is what I'll have to shell out. Still, not too bad if it's a good book.
 
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Sauté anything. To me it's more like really cooking. I can sauté my Entree and build a sauce all in one pan. I like to touch, feel, taste and smell when I cook so Sauté gives me that.
 
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