What is the effect of incorporating herbs and spices in the dough (if any)?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by butzy, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. butzy

    butzy

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    I am just wondering what the effect is...

    I have added turmeric to empanada dough to be able to differentiate between the different fillings and I have used paprika powder in the same way (just for colouring)

    I have tried making pizza with some garlic and mixed herbs added to make the crust a bit more interesting, but do any of these have an effect on rising time or anything else?
     
  2. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I have often used herbs, spices, onions, etc. to flavor and color dough for certain things and I haven't found it to affect the dough in any way.
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've done roasted garlic and herbs in pizza dough to make up for salt reduction.  Many of these things do have some properties that can inhibit growth and such. In the amounts used for flavorings, it's not a big deal in my experience. And in an empanada (pastry) dough that's not leavened by living things, there's no need to worry. 
     
  4. butzy

    butzy

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    Thanks!

    I hadn't noticed an effect, but was just wondering.....

    Then again. I am not much of a baker, but slowly getting better (and my sourdough bread is pretty good).

    Playing around a bit with making pizza's and what I make is better than what I can get locally, but still not good enough.

    I like the added garlic and mixed herbs to the dough. I do like the roasted garlic idea as well.

    Got to try that!

    I am trying to get my hands on a pizza stone, but they are not easy to get here......
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't stress about the pizza stone. If you search here at cheftalk, there are other options that should be available to you. 

    First up, is cast iron. Large flat griddles do well for bread and are a good shape for pizza. I use a cast iron pizza pan from Lodge, but you might have difficulty getting that particular item as well. 

    There are also steel sheets that have higher heat capacity than vitreous "stones" and give that heat back to the food more quickly.  Ah, here's one of the baking steel links. This is just a thickish sheet of steel you can use in your oven as a baking stone.  i would think you could get such a thing more easily. 

    http://www.cheftalk.com/t/80288/feedback-on-baking-steel
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2015
  6. butzy

    butzy

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    Thanks @phatch

    I have read a couple of articles about different surfaces to cook on on serious eats (http://slice.seriouseats.com/archiv...urface-for-baking-pizza-finale-slideshow.html)

    Then yesterday, when I was in town, I found some quarry tiles and I decided to buy some. They are cheap anyway (about .4 U$ per tile).

    Now I need to give them a good clean and try them out.

    I may have to carefully break some to fill the oven space properly (I use quite a small oven for home use).

    I suppose I can use them on the bbq as well.....