What is my alternative to balsamic vinegar when making a pomodoro sauce?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by homemadecook, Apr 15, 2010.

  1. gypsy2727

    gypsy2727

    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    well D.C. ,  it sounds like a  Bruschetta mix could do the same thing for this recipe until I saw "'or canned tomatoes "  as after all there is no method to this recipe


    back to the grind 


    Gypsy 
     
  2. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    46
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Thanks, Gypsy,

    But that wasn't exactly my question.  I'm not speaking as a chef but just as a person who's been living in Italy for (way too many!) years.  I'm not familiar with the terms used in English for Italian dishes any more.   

    In Italian, "pomodoro sauce" (sugo di pomodoro) is a very generic name.  It just means tomato sauce.  But the original question was framed in such a way that it would seem like it's a specific term for a specific kind of tomato sauce in English.  In fact sugo di pomodoro can simply refer to the juice that settles when you've cut open tomatoes - because it also means juice.  "Salsa di pomodoro" often is used for an ingredient - a sort of tomato reduction, some people even use it to refer to tomato paste.  Since most everyday pasta has a tomato sauce, it doesn't say much.

    In Italian, Pesto would not be equated generally with "salsa verde" which, while it simply means "green sauce" and could be used to refer to pesto,  I've only heard the term is used for a specific sauce made with parsley and generally used on boiled meat. And you can have pesto that is not green at all (pesto di noci).   But fair enough if in the US it's become a culinary term with a different meaning.  We say french dressing, and it has nothing to do with what is put on salad in france.  Who cares in the end, as long as we know what we're talking about.

    "Salsa di carni pomodoro" is not Italian - it would sort of mean tomato meats sauce!  You might call it sugo di carne, ragu alla carne, sugo di pomodoro con carne - you wouldn't say "carni" unless it used more than one kind of meat, and you wouldn't ever say "carni pomodoro" which doesn't make sense grammatically.   

    I'm not being snobby here, but just want to point out that the terms used in the States or other English-speaking countries are not the same or simply literal translations of what is used in Italy.  Take "shrimp scampi" which is a pretty common term for a particular shrimp dish.  In Italian it means "shrimp shrimp" - and makes no sense.  But it doesn't matter if we use it in English because everyone knows what we're talking about.  Or take that dish that became very popular in the 70s, "pasta primavera" - it's a very un-italian dish, you would never have encountered it here, at least in those days, and used an italian term for something un-italian.

    Now that terms in Italian are becoming popular in English because Italy has become trendy, and new italian words are being used which I never heard in English before and with a specific meaning, which is not always the Italian meaning because they're being invented in English-speaking countries.  I was just wondering specifically what HomeMadeCook meant by "pomodoro sauce". I thought it might have referred to a specific sauce that has recently become popular in the states.  If HMC meant simply tomato sauce, I doubt she(he?) would have said pomodoro sauce, but maybe not, maybe now everyone calls "tomato sauce" "pomodoro sauce."
    I wasn't asking what it meant but what the poster specifically meant by it - if it was intended to refer to a specific kind of sauce. 

    The reason I asked that is that if it's a specific kind of sauce, then maybe the vinegar is essential to it.  It also might be a raw sauce, which would make it very different with the same ingredients.  I've never encountered a tomato sauce with vinegar in it, and to answer the original question I wanted to know just what was that particular person meant by "pomodoro sauce".

    I still would love to know if HMC 's recipe called for cooking it or not. 

    Ok, sorry, I guess I have too much time on my hands!  (Or, more truthfully, I have way too much to do that I don't feel like doing!)
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010
  3. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Other
    Siduri,
    I agree.  Too many names of dishes are becoming to be used for a wide variety of dishes - and therein comes the confusion.  Spaghetti Bolognese is a classic mess of interpretations.  And lasagne.  A roasted layered vegetable (aubergine, onion, zucchini etc) is not a lasagne. It forms the same shape but surely it cannot be called a lasagne- Can it?.  This sort of things annoys me too.  And please - don't get me started on pizza.  While I am a stickler for names of dishes being what they were originally - the names do serve a purpose. They tell you what the dish is.Baguettes are baguettes (dang they are nice :) ). Tzsatziki is Tzsazike (mm yum). What I'm saying is - don't re-invent the wheel - it is round - it works,

    As in a Yorkshire pudding - it's one basic recipe, we know what it is. But so many recipies have been bastardised you can't recognise the original dish.

    P.S. Bughut - I have a mountain fo ironing, but I'd rather do this
     
  4. gypsy2727

    gypsy2727

    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    As I said before Chef's have chewed the fat over this one forever and long after us ...still will. My intent Sidiri was not to termanologize specifics, but to try and get the point across that there are many different interpretations to 'Tomato Sauce" there is no one way  I'm sure from your Italian back ground you can relate. I have worked with many Italian chefs and Catered 1000's of Italian Weddings and the Bride & Groom and the "Family", all have different opinions of the different ways they would like the Tomato Sauce on the wedding day !  lol   BTW I did mean to say Pesto OR  Salsa Verde (green sauce) yes I agree with Parsley and I like to add Capers , that is my take on it !....lol)

    Gotta go..... I'm walking for MS today 10K

    Gypsy
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010