What is considered a normal "rise" ?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by bond, Sep 10, 2005.

  1. bond

    bond

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    When baking dinner rolls (using a bread recipe)- 75% of the time I wind up with a dough that doubles before baking. The other 25% of the time - the dough TRIPLES in volume. I am trying to find out why that is. I have been beating my brains out on this. I repeat the same exact procedure over and over again and don't don't understand how one batch can double and another one can triple. Has anyone else ever have this happen to them? Exactly what is "normal"? Am I doing something wrong since it doesn't triple every time or am I just lucky and should just learn to accept it and be happy when it happens.

    Steve
     
  2. sucrechef

    sucrechef

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    Normal is usually double. You say that you are repeating exactly the same method every time. Things to consider:
    1.) Are you measuring all ingredients EXACTLY?
    2.) Is the temperature the same?
    3.) Is the humidity level the same?
    4.) Are youkneading to exactly the same level of gluten development?

    Each of these factors could play a part in your discrepancies.
     
  3. bond

    bond

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    To the best my ability- I am doing everything the same. I am by no means a pro at this. I've only made about 30 batches so far. I had some total failures in the beginning. One of the problems was - I more or less used my finger to judge the water temp for the yeast .(lol) But I have refined the techique since then and am very satisfied with the results including the occasional- mysterious- "Super Rise". I just thought perhaps someone here may have had this happen to them and could give me an explaination. I honestly didn't what was considered "normal". If the "Super Rise" was normal or if the doubling was normal. There just has to be an X factor to explain it and perhaps in time- I'll figure it out on my own.

    Thanks

    Steve
     
  4. kylew

    kylew

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    While you should be able to get reasonably predictable results, a 50% variation is a little much. Braed baking is the control of a living breathing thing. As such you will always have slight variations in results.

    As sucrechef pointed out, there are a number of variables that will effect your bread. Are you weighing your ingredients?
     
  5. bond

    bond

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    No- I don't weigh my ingrediants. I honestly don't think that's the problem. When I add the yeast- I can pretty much tell how it's going to come out just by the texture of the dough. It just seems so light and airy. I just thought a a bigger rise would be better even if you can't really taste the difference. It sure looks impressive though to see the dough get huge like that.

    Steve
     
  6. mudbug

    mudbug

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    The key to baking is measuring.

    There is absolutely no way for any of us to help you if you are not measuring your ingredients. The difference between half a teaspoon truly can make a large difference.

    In fact, if you had been measuring your ingredients during your 30 tries, I highly doubt you'd be asking the question at all, much less "beating your brains out" trying to figure it out. You can't figure something out if you don't keep records of exactly what you've done.

    Exactly what type of flour are you using? unbleached? self-rising? whole grain? all-purpose? other?

    Exactly what type of yeast are you using? cake? rapid rise? bread machine? other?

    Are you adding salt? or sugar?

    Try measuring, it won't add more than a minute or two of time and will also provide a scientific method by which you and we can determine what is going on. Measure the quantity/weight of ingredients. Measure the temperature of the water you proof the yeast in. If you are not proofing, then you need to explain exactly the recipe you are using and what order of steps you are using. Measure the air temperature in the room you are allowing the dough to raise. If you can, measure the humidity as well.

    Speed in raising dough may be fun to witness, but experienced bakers know that this is not the secret to quality product. The ideal rise, depending on the type of bread is minimal yeast and a long rise in a cooler temp. The longer the dough is allowed to rise, the more flavor is developed.

    Be precise.