What is a Quay

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by madcowcutlery, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. madcowcutlery

    madcowcutlery

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    A customer of mine sent over some pickled quays, and they were really good, but I have no idea what they are.  Anyone know?

    Thanks,

    D. Clay
     
  2. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Hmm as far as I know its like a jetty.  Are you sure that's the right spelling?  Googling it doesn't bring up anything about fruit/veg.
     
  3. siduri

    siduri

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    What do they look like?  That might help.  why do i think quail eggs?  I don't really know, just a wild guess
     
  4. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I believe they are a type of pickle.
     
  5. madcowcutlery

    madcowcutlery

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    I found a recipe online for pickled quays, but in the recipe it said to slice the quay and remove the seeds.  The pickled quays I got are green rings of some sort of vegetable.  They are the size of an old US silver dollar and look like gear cogs.  There are some pieces in there that are smaller, giving me the impression that it might have been some sort of cucumber or squash.  The customer dropped them off at my office then left, then someone in the office brought them to me so I didn't have the chance to ask what they were.  I am going to ask my customer what they are the next time I see her, but that could be days from now.  On the jar where she included the ingredients, she listed quay.  Thanks for the help.

    D. Clay
     
  6. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I've checked all my references, and can't find it under cucumbers, melons, or squashes. Doesn't mean much, though, as there are hundreds of varieties that fit.

    From your description, however, I'd guess that they are either a Russian or Japanese cucumber or pickling melon.

    Be nice if your customer knows what they are.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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  8. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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  9. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    One of my first thoughts, Phil, was that they were Armenian Cukes (aka, serpent cucumber, snake cucumber), which, of course, are really melons.

    However, none of my references use quay as a synonym, which is why I suspect a lesser known Russian or Japanese variety. Or maybe even one from any of the Indian Ocean islands.

    Of course, the way things go, "quay" is probably some foreign word that merely translates as "pickle." /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
     
  10. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Hmm. Where have you seen this term, precisely? I'm wondering about the spelling.

    See, if this were printed in mainland China today, I would pronounce the word "chooway," roughly. If I saw it coming from maybe Hong Kong and an older label, I'd pronounce it "kway." If it's Japanese, I'd be up a creek, because there's nothing obviously parallel at all. And so it goes.

    But the point is, the two Chinese terms, que and kuei are totally different. In roughly the same way as, let's say, "eye" and "aim" are different in English. And they could be transcribed into English in remarkably different ways. And, of course, that's just assuming Mandarin, which is a very bad assumption with imported foods, so many of which still come from Cantonese or Fukienese-speaking areas. So if one could narrow down roughly how it's supposed to sound, or at least what language it's supposed to be coming from, we might have reasonable odds of pinning it down.
     
  11. madcowcutlery

    madcowcutlery

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    I talked to the person that made the pickle quay and they are Armenian cucumbers that they grow themselves.  I was told that quay was what they were called for a very long time, but I couldn't find out why.

    D. Clay 
     
  12. frankg61

    frankg61

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    They are called Quay and are some type of cucumber. When I was a kid I stayed at my moms aunt Tish's house in Brady Tx and she gave me some. They were hot but were so good I didn't care. Maybe someone from that area can respond with a recipe.
     
  13. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I know of kueh, as in Nonya Kueh, Ang ku kueh, etc.  Basically a Chinese/Malay pastry or dessert.
     
  14. michele breaux

    michele breaux

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    Ha, I was came across this looking for a picture of quay pickles to send to someone.  Quays are what people in Brady call Armenian Cucumbers.  My grandparents lived in Brady and I just loved those hot pickled quays!
     
     
  15. huntergal

    huntergal

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    Frankg61 you are right, quay is a pickle and very crunchy. I can them myself, you can make them hot or not! And believe it or not I grew up in Brady Texas!,,,
     
  16. sorola

    sorola

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    there has to be a connection to Brady I was born raised grew up there and my Mom used to make them She has gone to be with the Lord but I would love to know what they are....
     
  17. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I had forgotten about this thread.  My wife is involved with a folk dance group that focuses on eastern Europe, Turkey, etc.  One of her friends grew some Armenian cucumbers and gave us some last year.  Of course I pickled them - one batch kind of sweet, one rather spicy - very good!

    mjb.
     
  18. teamfat

    teamfat

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  19. huntergal

    huntergal

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    Sorola, they are a Armenian cucumber!
     
  20. peggy816

    peggy816

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    My Great Aunt lived in Groom, TX and she made quay pickles and I 

    loved them.   They always seemed in limited supply though.