What happens to the mirepoix... after?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by geek2chef, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. geek2chef

    geek2chef

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    I apologize in advance if this is a dumb question but what happens to the mirepoix after your broth is strained? Are the vegetables typically thrown away or are they used elsewhere?  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lookaround.gif  
     
  2. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Toss 'em.  They've given their all for the stock.
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Why not add them to the soup bowl as a garnish.
     
  4. neworleanscookj

    neworleanscookj

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    At this one Colombian restaurant I worked at they would make a pulled pork that was cooked overnight, the next morning the pork shoulder was removed and the mirepoix was strained out of the broth/jus after the bay leafs were removed. It was then run through a food processor adding the degreased jus to achieve a heavy salsa sort of consistency. This was then added in the sauté pan with said pork when an order fired. It definitely moistened and refreshed the pulled pork throughout, as the shoulder was quite large before shredding. Other than that application, I've always seen mirepoix discarded after stock or broth making; however I've also heard of adding a second mirepoix to stews when near completion to add texture and contrast to the meat.
     
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  5. mike9

    mike9

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    I give it to my chickens.
     
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  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Honestly I don't eat it.  The mushiness is bleehhhhh!  Hubby likes the onions and I can somewhat tolerate the carrots but I usually just chuck it. Could it be composted?
     
  7. neworleanscookj

    neworleanscookj

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    Composting seems like a very good idea, even if the nutrients are mostly leached out I think it would still provide a good medium for the other components of the compost.
     
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  8. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    I never did this but, if you think of how we make mashed potatoes it's basically the something. You can mash the mirepoix with some leftover mashed potatoes. Season with S&P chopped green onion, granulated garlic, parsley one egg if needed.  Form the mixture into patties and fry in some butter or olive oil. I would sprinkle some paprika on the first side down don't play with it just let it get a nice crust before it flipped over. You can also think of using it for a veggie patty buy adding some other vegetables and then dredging in flour, egg and panko bread crumbs or a Italian seasoned bread crumbs...........
     
  9. neworleanscookj

    neworleanscookj

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    Most of these ideas fall under the zero waste sort of mentality. Honestly if you can't think of something to enhance something with easily, or do something constructive like compost or animal feed, then I'd pitch it.
     
  10. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    One mans trash is another mans treasure. Our North American ideas for using waste could be a full meal for a 3rd world country. The people who had parents and grandparents who lived through the depression know how to utilize waste. Most Americans being born with a silver spoon in their mouths don't worry about their next meal. 
     
  11. grande

    grande

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    It's pretty flavorless as it's overcooked & unseasoned. Totally edible, and impregnated with delicious meat juices, though. You could eat it, but I don't know if I'd serve it. In "The Kitchen Book," Nicolas Freeling describes slicing it, decorating it with bay leaf, selling it in a hotel restaurant. I can't imagine ordering that, maybe it went on a buffet. Hmmm.... with salt, and pepper, and a little acid, that might be good.
     
  12. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I works very well as a thickener for gravy.  This is what I do when I make a pot roast.  Use an immersion blender and buzz it up with some of the stock.  Season with salt and pepper.