What foods have gluten?

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Good morning,
I am especially concerned about my health. Therefore, the nutrients you put into your body must also be calculated properly. Right now I'm looking to add gluten to my body. So I hope people can tell me which foods contain gluten that I can use to provide my body with gluten.
Thank you very much.
 
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Anything made from wheat or foods that contain wheat products will have gluten. A quick reference would be anything that's made from a dough.......bread, pasta, cookies, cakes, crackers, etc.

Other foods that contain gluten are soy sauce, certain soups (soups made from beans, lentils etc), rice, gravies, beer/ale etc.

A more complete list of foods that contain gluten can easily be found with a simple search on Google.

Cheers! :)
 

phatch

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Gluten isn't an essential nutrient.its just wheat protein.
 
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My understanding is gluten is something that results from a process.
The proteins can be in the food but unless developed ..... ?

If thats right, then a typical cookie with wheat flour will not have gluten because the water level is too low to develop the proteins into those gluten strands.
The proteins seem inert, insoluble... and if undeveloped, they will pass through the body.
If I wanted gluten, a baguette works for me.
For protein, why not just an energy drink.
 
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That's correct. Gluten formation is the result of a process. When water or moisture is added to the dough, the water encourages glutenin and gliadin to bind and form gluten. The more moisture and the more the dough is kneaded, the more gluten.

So, even if the cookie dough, which uses flour, is kneaded to only a minimal extent, some gluten strands will form as a result of the high water content in the eggs that most cookie recipes call for.

Less water and higher fat content = chewy cookies because of less gluten. Gluten can't form in fat.

More water and less fat = crunchy cookies because of higher gluten.

Cheers! :)
 
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Other foods that contain gluten are soy sauce, certain soups (soups made from beans, lentils etc), rice, gravies, beer/ale etc.

A more complete list of foods that contain gluten can easily be found with a simple search on Google.

Cheers! :)
Soy sauce contains wheat, so it's not an other food: the wheat in soy sauce contributes to the gluten. By opposition, Tamari does not contain wheat and is therefore gluten-free.
Beans do not contain gluten.
Lentils do not contain gluten.
Rice does not contain gluten.
Soups and gravies contain gluten only if made from ingredients that can develop gluten (wheat mostly).
 
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Soy sauce contains wheat, so it's not an other food: the wheat in soy sauce contributes to the gluten. By opposition, Tamari does not contain wheat and is therefore gluten-free.
Beans do not contain gluten.
Lentils do not contain gluten.
Rice does not contain gluten.
Soups and gravies contain gluten only if made from ingredients that can develop gluten (wheat mostly)

The OP is actually looking for foods that have gluten.

Don't recall mentioning Tamari. But, if you want to get into semantics, soy sauce is ingested and has gluten. That's what matters. Condiments are formally categorized as "supplemental foods." The operative word in that phrase being "food".

Also, its not uncommon to find gluten in a can of beans. Even dried beans are permitted to have a certain percentage of foreign grain such as rye, wheat or barley. Both dried and canned beans can contain up to 20 ppm of these gluten producing grains by law. The same with dry lentils. Even if the label on these products says "gluten free", they may actually contain gluten as a result of cross contamination at the plant where they're produced.

So, unless you're talking about eating a fist full of washed beans or lentils that have been tested for gluten-containing foreign grains, everything I said still stands.

Cheers! :)
 
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Joined Dec 29, 2019
The OP is actually looking for foods that have gluten.

Don't recall mentioning Tamari. But, if you want to get into semantics, soy sauce is ingested and has gluten. That's what matters. Condiments are formally categorized as "supplemental foods." The operative word in that phrase being "food".

Also, its not uncommon to find gluten in a can of beans. Even dried beans are permitted to have a certain percentage of foreign grain such as rye, wheat or barley. Both dried and canned beans can contain up to 20 ppm of these gluten producing grains by law. The same with dry lentils. Even if the label on these products says "gluten free", they may actually contain gluten as a result of cross contamination at the plant where they're produced.

So, unless you're talking about eating a fist full of washed beans or lentils that have been tested for gluten-containing foreign grains, everything I said still stands.

Cheers! :)
Its not uncommon to find rat hair in anything either, FDA allows 5PPM in agricultural food supply.
Gluten does not exist until its formed by the mixing process.
Hi-Gluten flour will not produce gluten until its mixed sufficiently to form the strands we call gluten.
If you take pure essential gluten and stir it with a bit of water it will instantly form gluten , like rubber.
But do the same with hi-gluten flour and you can get a slurry that will not produce any gluten if it doesn't get mixed enough to form. You can clearly demonstrate this by rinsing some well developed dough under cold water, the gluten strands will remain in your hands after the starch and ash etc is washed out, because those other ingredients are soluble.

But if you take a slurry of hi-gluten flour and water and rinse it there will be no gluten after it is rinsed, it will all go down the drain because it isn't there. The proteins were present but were not developed into gluten.

Theres a lot of mkting wank going on here, they put gluten free on any label they can.
And most of the people reading it aren't celiac, the actual number of people who are intolerant is very low. Theres a whole lot of diners who are pretending they are for special treatment, they need drama in their life. One diner asked the waiter come back and ask if theres gluten in lettuce.
If you cater to them in the mistaken idea that its good business they will tie you in knots.

Theres a restaurant in Ireland that became famous when the owner got sick of the allergic customers wanting special everything, that attracted the vegetarians, then the vegans, in the end he put signs up telling them all to F off.
 
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You make some good points, especially about the number of so called "gluten sensitive" people out there.

If the intended goal is to avoid gluten, which is not the case given the OP's statement, how the gluten becomes part of the food is academic. The fact that its present, even in foods marketed as "gluten free", is what matters.

"Hi-Gluten flour will not produce gluten until its mixed sufficiently to form the strands we call gluten.
If you take pure essential gluten and stir it with a bit of water it will instantly form gluten , like rubber."

This is an issue that is very commonly misunderstood. The flour already has gluten. Gluten inherent to the grain. What you're talking about is gluten development which is the chemical process that encourages gluten to form strands. This process is begun by adding water.

"But do the same with hi-gluten flour and you can get a slurry that will not produce any gluten if it doesn't get mixed enough to form. You can clearly demonstrate this by rinsing some well developed dough under cold water, the gluten strands will remain in your hands after the starch and ash etc is washed out, because those other ingredients are soluble."

This is mostly correct. Again, the gluten is present. What's not present are gluten strands because the slurry was not kneaded or mixed sufficiently to encourage gluten strands to form. You are correct that the other ingredients will wash out because they are soluble and gluten is not. However, what you're seeing is most likely gluten and starch along with some other remnants of the chemical process that begins when water is added to the flour. The only means to separate gluten from the starch is through the centrifugal process. Once the gluten has been separated from the starch, then it can be removed, rinsed and used for something else or thrown away.

"But if you take a slurry of hi-gluten flour and water and rinse it there will be no gluten after it is rinsed, it will all go down the drain because it isn't there. The proteins were present but were not developed into gluten."

As previously stated, gluten is already present in the flour. The flour also contains glutenin and gliadin that are the components that form gluten. While rinsing may wash away these proteins, rinsing will not rinse away the gluten that is inherent to the grain and flour.

"Theres a lot of mkting wank going on here, they put gluten free on any label they can.
And most of the people reading it aren't celiac, the actual number of people who are intolerant is very low. Theres a whole lot of diners who are pretending they are for special treatment, they need drama in their life. One diner asked the waiter come back and ask if theres gluten in lettuce.

If you cater to them in the mistaken idea that its good business they will tie you in knots."

I could not agree more. In my restaurant, we didn't cater to gluten sensitive guests. If a guest asked about gluten free menu options, there were told that we do not offer such options, per se. They either chose to stay or they didn't. No big deal. My business model wasn't predicated upon the choice of gluten sensitive customers to eat in my restaurant.

"Theres a restaurant in Ireland that became famous when the owner got sick of the allergic customers wanting special everything, that attracted the vegetarians, then the vegans, in the end he put signs up telling them all to F off."

That's hysterical. Love it!

Cheers! :)
 
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Joined Dec 29, 2019
You make some good points, especially about the number of so called "gluten sensitive" people out there.

If the intended goal is to avoid gluten, which is not the case given the OP's statement, how the gluten becomes part of the food is academic. The fact that its present, even in foods marketed as "gluten free", is what matters.

"Hi-Gluten flour will not produce gluten until its mixed sufficiently to form the strands we call gluten.
If you take pure essential gluten and stir it with a bit of water it will instantly form gluten , like rubber."

This is an issue that is very commonly misunderstood. The flour already has gluten. Gluten inherent to the grain. What you're talking about is gluten development which is the chemical process that encourages gluten to form strands. This process is begun by adding water.

"But do the same with hi-gluten flour and you can get a slurry that will not produce any gluten if it doesn't get mixed enough to form. You can clearly demonstrate this by rinsing some well developed dough under cold water, the gluten strands will remain in your hands after the starch and ash etc is washed out, because those other ingredients are soluble."

This is mostly correct. Again, the gluten is present. What's not present are gluten strands because the slurry was not kneaded or mixed sufficiently to encourage gluten strands to form. You are correct that the other ingredients will wash out because they are soluble and gluten is not. However, what you're seeing is most likely gluten and starch along with some other remnants of the chemical process that begins when water is added to the flour. The only means to separate gluten from the starch is through the centrifugal process. Once the gluten has been separated from the starch, then it can be removed, rinsed and used for something else or thrown away.

"But if you take a slurry of hi-gluten flour and water and rinse it there will be no gluten after it is rinsed, it will all go down the drain because it isn't there. The proteins were present but were not developed into gluten."

As previously stated, gluten is already present in the flour. The flour also contains glutenin and gliadin that are the components that form gluten. While rinsing may wash away these proteins, rinsing will not rinse away the gluten that is inherent to the grain and flour.

"Theres a lot of mkting wank going on here, they put gluten free on any label they can.
And most of the people reading it aren't celiac, the actual number of people who are intolerant is very low. Theres a whole lot of diners who are pretending they are for special treatment, they need drama in their life. One diner asked the waiter come back and ask if theres gluten in lettuce.

If you cater to them in the mistaken idea that its good business they will tie you in knots."

I could not agree more. In my restaurant, we didn't cater to gluten sensitive guests. If a guest asked about gluten free menu options, there were told that we do not offer such options, per se. They either chose to stay or they didn't. No big deal. My business model wasn't predicated upon the choice of gluten sensitive customers to eat in my restaurant.

"Theres a restaurant in Ireland that became famous when the owner got sick of the allergic customers wanting special everything, that attracted the vegetarians, then the vegans, in the end he put signs up telling them all to F off."

That's hysterical. Love it!

Cheers! :)
I see it a lot on food forums, "my daughter is allergic to X but she loves it, how can we make the same thing without x". Theres an obsession with trying to have what is forbidden.

Irish Restaurant Goes Viral After Banning Vegans​

https://www.foodandwine.com/news/irish-restaurant-bans-vegans
 
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