What else to use dried cranberries in?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chrisbelgium, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Yesterday I  made a discovery by using "dried cranberries" in a salad. I opened this package that lived silently and undisturbed in my home for over a year now, thinking it had to go, but I tasted first... wooooow! Little did I know that these "dried" cranberries have the texture of raisins but a much better balance of sweet and sour compared to raisins. I was expecting hard-dried fruits. I added a handful to my salad improvisation yesterday and ended up with a stunning result and very nice comments and questions; http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner/3870#post_476808

    These dried cranberries are very unknown on my side of The Large Pond. What else do you guys on the other side use them in?

    I bought this package more than a year ago in the German Lidl discount where it was sold as a temporary item.

     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
  2. chefross

    chefross

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    Biscotti

    Scones

    Bars

    Cookies

    Stuffing or dressings for poultry or wild game

    added to sautéed vegetables

    They can be reconstituted and used as a relish sauce or glaze
     
  3. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Ditto.

    I like to macerate them in a little Grand Marnier and substitute for raisins in things like rice pudding, raisin nut bread, carrot cake, etc.
     
  4. ordo

    ordo

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    Nice detail for the filling of cottage pies, if you want a sweet touch there.
     
  5. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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     Chris, dried cranberries are marketed as Craisins over here and are very popular.

     
  6. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Some very interesting suggestions to play with, guys, thanks!

    I ate the rest straight from the package. The name "craisins" says it all when it comes to the resemblance with raisins. I love this stuff!
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    Chris, two ideas at the top of my head: 

    Couscous with cranberries and sliced or slivered almonds. 

    Bread pudding with cranberries. 
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Ah, yes, couscous! Thanks FF! Had a nice holiday?
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    Pretty nice thank you Chris! Lots of good food & wine! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  10. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I can see them with various forcemeats as well. 
     
  11. janedoe10001

    janedoe10001

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    Your breakfast cereal bowl, cold or hot

    Farro or any grain really, Bulgar, Quinoa, Salad

    Pasta & Vegetable Salad

    It goes well with several Pork, Turkey or Chicken dishs

    Fruit Salad with a Honey-Yogurt-Mint dressing

    Venison, Wild Boar
     
  12. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I use them in salads a lot, especially with toasted walnuts. And during the winter I eat them in my oatmeal just about every day. As others have said: scones, stuffing/dressing, instead of raisins in any baked good. Rice pudding. I like them with wild rice used to stuff squash in the winter. Chicken salad.
     
  13. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I love them in my homemade granola, as well as various baked products, from muffins to cookies.  And of course, as many have stated, they make a great addition to salads.
     
  14. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Thanks for all the suggestions! I was wondering, when using raisins in baking or ice cream making, many times raisins are steeped in rum. Has anyone done it with dried cranberries? I am particularly thinking to try to steep cranberries in limoncello and add them to vanilla ice cream. Never tried it of course, but I'm almost sure that must be a stunning combo with that touch of extra lemon taste from the limoncello.
     
  15. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Never considered Limoncello but it would be interesting.  I've also used whiskey as the cranberries can stand up to it's stronger flavor.
     
  16. chefmannydlm

    chefmannydlm

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    Cook them in chicken stock with orange juice, brown sugar and a cinnamon stick and then use that as a glaze for pork.
     
  17. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    I think limoncello would be good too. Orange is a traditional flavor to marry well with cranberries, but the whiskey or even rum would be delicious as well. They could be cooked down with some water and sugar to make a syrup for drinks, too.

    Although I use fresh or frozen cranberries to make a relish, I bet you could use the dried ones too. You'd just have to use less sugar since the dried ones are usually sweetened. 

    I grind one 12 ounce bag of fresh cranberries (thawed or frozen) with one small navel orange (slice off the ends of the orange but grind it peel and all), one small lemon (peel and all). Sweeten to taste. I also add some ground ginger, or you could add a little grated fresh ginger if you like. Allow to macerate at least 6 hours or overnight. I serve it with Thanksgiving dinner, but it's great on turkey sandwiches or even over vanilla ice cream.

    By the way, my state (Wisconsin) produces most of the cranberries grown in the U.S. A good friend has a group of bogs in Warrens County, which hosts a huge cranberry festival every September.