What do you think of online Culinary schools?

Discussion in 'Choosing A Culinary School' started by abefroman, Oct 6, 2014.

  1. abefroman

    abefroman

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    I Just Like Food
    What do you think of online Culinary schools?
     
  2. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Line Cook
    I would really question the practical experience of a potential hire who only had that online degree and no industry experience. If it's someone trying to do career development as best they can with other industry experience or certifications in the pocket, I guess it's a plus? I don't see any real pros to taking the course online, only cons: lack of equipment, lack of guided tutelage, presumably you could just complete coursework doing NO practical applications of the knowledge and still earn the online degree (admittedly have not looked into the courses or how the work).
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  3. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I will grant that the practical work experience gained at a brick and mortar culinary school bares little resemblance to real life restaurant work, however the idea of an online culinary school seems even further removed from reality. I can't get the idea of comparing it to an online swimming school out of my mind.

    Yes knowledge can be gained from an online school, but I can't imagine someone studying online would learn to break down a whole salmon, cook a steamship round, or make a croquembouche.

    Yes if you can break down a trout, you can break down a salmon. Same thing, but not.

    Yes if you can roast a top round, you can roast a steamship round. Same thing, but not.

    Yes if you can make profiteroles, you can make a croquembouche. Same thing, but not.

    Yes, but how often these days is a professional chef going to be asked to break down a whole salmon, roast a steamship round, and prepare a croquembouche.

    I don't know, but so far this year, I have done each of those tasks at the request of a client.

    Food for thought.
     
  4. tweakz

    tweakz

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    In this area, rumor is that most restaurants are owned by coke heads, and many places are a tax write off or some other money funneling scheme that doesn't care how good of a cook or chef you are. Most of the managers I've worked for in this area were coke heads and could give a crap about how well you cook something. Cocaine is big here. Many of the people I work around are dealers of at least pot. If you fit in with this; school *might* be for you.

    I've known of a person that went to college for auto-mechanics and after 18 jobs in that field could not find an honest employer to work for that wouldn't coerce them into lying to the customers. -They gave up and wasted the education. Food service is one of the easiest fields to get into. My employer hires borderline retarded people as cooks.

    I'd say dip your toe into the pool first. Talk to people who've worked the other places. This is one of those fields where apprenticeships still work. Online learning + real life experience will get you some skills, but I don't think this field is worth paying for an education in.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2015