What did you have for dinner?

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We really like rabbit in this country. From now on, nearly every supermarket will have rabbit available, nicely cut in pieces. I presume that 99% of the rabbit we eat over here is farmed! Nothing wrong with that, just make it taste right. One of our traditional dishes is rabbit with dark beer and prunes.

In winter, rabbit comes to our table maybe once a month.
 
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Last night I had Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Couscous (caramelized red onions, pine nuts and spring onion in couscous to jazz it up a bit, cooked in stock) which I'd made at cookery school night before. Was utterly delicious, I am going to make it again on Sunday so husband can try it too. It was so tasty and perfect now the weather is turning and it's getting chilly. 

 
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We really like rabbit in this country. From now on, nearly every supermarket will have rabbit available, nicely cut in pieces. I presume that 99% of the rabbit we eat over here is farmed! Nothing wrong with that, just make it taste right. One of our traditional dishes is rabbit with dark beer and prunes.

In winter, rabbit comes to our table maybe once a month.
Hey Chris,

I have never cooked or eaten rabbit, although I hear it's lovely. Had a rabbit as a child and that's always put me off. However, I think I am now ready to give it a bash. What would you recommend a novice try first?

Thanks,

Goldi
 
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Goldi, here you go. Start with this, then go further under 1. or 2. for some more specific finish.

->Start with braising the rabbit, meaning; first take all the time to color all the pieces nicely in butter/oil, season, remove the meat, sweat onion/garlic/shallot (I prefer shallot and garlic only). Add rabbit again, dust with a tbsp of flour, stir and let it color also. Then add a good dash of white wine, let the alcohol evaporate, add chicken or vegetable stock up to around 1/3 of the height of the meat. Put a "cartouche" (parchment paper circle) on top plus the lid. Let simmer for around 1 hour. Test doneness with the tip of a knife. Season. From then on, you can play around. Two examples;

1. Rabbit in a somewhat chasseur-style; same preparation as described above. Braise some baby onions in very little butter/sugar/stock mixture. Sauté some mushrooms of your choice and add to the sauce 15 minutes before the end of the cooking time. I used chestnut mushrooms and a little dried (but soaked) porcini. Served it with a parsnip puree.


2. Rabbit in a mustard sauce; same preparation as described above. Then remove the cooked meat from the pot, reduce the sauce a bit, then add a generous tbsp of grainy mustard and a bit of cream. Keep stirring to get it all together. I posted a similar recipe like this a long time ago on CT;

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/67807/rabbit-in-a-mustard-sauce
 
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Thank you so much Chris, I've printed that out and will give it a try. The above looks fab, and that parsnip puree is making my mouth water just thinking about it!

I was at the butchers earlier today buying 22 chicken breasts and 1kg lamb neck for this weekend and they had some great looking rabbit. That will be next weekends challenge, I have enough going on tomorrow /img/vbsmilies/smilies/surprised.gif   /img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif

The is chicken for dinner party tomorrow night - that wine evening I spoke about a while ago -  and one person doesn't eat red meat. I'm stuffing the chicken with wild mushroom and pancetta, with a marsala sauce http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/...oom-and-bacon-stuffing-and-marsala-sauce.html. Never tried this before so i hope I don't mess it up. Looks easy enough, but still..
 
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I bought two lobsters today so I asked my wife if she wanted steamed lobster with corn and salad, or linguini with a fresh lobster sauce.  Linguini won so I pulled the lobsters apart, opened the carapace and got rid of the lungs then made a stock with leek, carrot, garlic, olive oil, thyme, white wine, a Tbs of compound butter, the legs, tail flippers, etc.  I cracked the claws and cut the tails in half then in pieces.  When the stock was reduced I put the linguini (dream fields) in the water and the lobster claws, tails, etc in a separate skillet with olive oil, peperoncino, salt & pepper.  I finished the linguini in the sauce and thickened with grated parmigiano and served the lobster pieces over top.  Sorry no pics - I'm getting bad about that, but trust me it was delicious. 

One side note - the tail pieces were more tender than a whole one steamed would be.  This is more work on the front end, but less work and more enjoyable on the back end if you know what I mean.
 
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Ragoût de marcassin - Ragoût of young wild boar

We just finished it this Saturday evening and I have to say that went quite well! I marinated the meat overnight in red wine and a bunch of aromats and spices.

Today I started by searing the meat, dust with flour, add sieved marinade and it all simmered for 1,5 hours. Then added a little dark chocolate, braised baby onions, fried lardons, fried chestnut mushrooms and simmer on very low fire for another 30 minutes.

Served with crushed potatoes mixed with braised leeks and a few Brussels sprouts.

 
 
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Chicken Breast Cordon Rouge, sautees Brussel sprouts and  bacon, Mashed with cheese, chipoltle and sour cream , chives mixed in, and I ate to much

 Last night went out to a new  Golden Coral for Buffet Supper I must say it was well worth the money, hot and tasty and real, I would go again..
 
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Last night went to a Golden Coral Buffet. I must say it was very good the food was hot, plentiful and real.,and presented nicely. Well worth $11.95 a person. I would go back again
 
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Some friends got back from visiting home near Hanover Germany and brought back kilos of good sausages and some fine weisbier. Grilling on a cool, clear october night.
 
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I was inspired by siduri

My version of Carne Alla Pizzaiola or steak pizzaiola

SIL gave me the recipe orginally, and I've changed it up to make it my own.

I melt anchovy fillets into the tomato sauce and add back the sautéed garlic cloves along with the seared New York strip steak (we share one)

let the entire lot bubble away until the meat is done to our liking, slice and serve with whole wheat spaghetti   and a small green salad.

That's how we do Sunday Supper at our table

Mangiamo
 
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Last night went to a Golden Coral Buffet. I must say it was very good the food was hot, plentiful and real.,and presented nicely. Well worth $11.95 a person. I would go back again
I remember going to Golden Coral when I lived in the south.  There is no such thing as all-you-can-eat buffets in NY.  Now tell me, what is a Chicken Breast Cordon Rouge?
 
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A La Kiev is butter and chive,  /Corden Bleu is  Ham and usually Swiss./  Cordon Rouge is Gruyer and Canadian Bacon/   Then there is Brie and Apples.

PS I don''t think anyone in NY could do an all you can eat buffet and certainly not for 11.95  (cost up their and rents to high.
 
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Had a hankering for some beef stroganoff the other day.  Didn't quite work out, and in the meantime I was browsing the menu of the place where the British Motor Club will be having its end of season dinner.  The chicken paprikash sounded good, so I got inspired to make some adding mushrooms, or making chicken stroganoff with paprika:


I'm sure neither approach has EVER been done before ;-)

It was very nice, a hot meal on a cool night.

mjb.
 
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