What are the best herbs for a French Omelet?

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I was wondering what were the best herbs to use in a simple french omelet? I have tried herbs of province with chives, and thyme with chives.

Also should you put black pepper in as well? Usually recipes don't mention it but maybe it is just expected that you would season to taste with salt and pepper.

thanks,
Scott
 
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I was wondering what were the best herbs to use in a simple french omelet? I have tried herbs of province with chives, and thyme with chives.

Also should you put black pepper in as well? Usually recipes don't mention it but maybe it is just expected that you would season to taste with salt and pepper.

thanks,
Scott

I stick with thyme and a bit of minced chives on top.
 
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For the classic French Omelette, the herbs are parsley, chives, tarragon and chervil. Chefs have been riffing on herb'd omelettes forever. There's really no wrong way to do it unless you are strictly trying to make the traditional French Omelette and either omit one of these herbs or add an herb that doesn't belong.

Black pepper is fine. However, I believe white pepper is used in the traditional French omelette. But, don't hold me to that.

As far as herbs go, you can use sage, thyme, cilantro, basil (all different kinds), dill, marjoram, oregano, fennel, spring onion, lavender, lemon thyme and so on. Try different combinations. The only wrong way to make an omelette is to burn it. :)
 
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[QUOTE="Black pepper is fine. However, I believe white pepper is used in the traditional French omelette. But, don't hold me to that.[/QUOTE]

Reminds me of a "discussion" I saw between Julia Child and Jacques Pepin. He is a fan of black pepper; her, not so much. When he used black pepper, she pointed out he must like "speckled food"
 
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Dill weed plus oregano or parsley flakes works well. As for adding salt and black pepper, it's wise to put that into the yolks while they're frying.
 

pete

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For the classic French Omelette, the herbs are parsley, chives, tarragon and chervil. Chefs have been riffing on herb'd omelettes forever. There's really no wrong way to do it unless you are strictly trying to make the traditional French Omelette and either omit one of these herbs or add an herb that doesn't belong.

Black pepper is fine. However, I believe white pepper is used in the traditional French omelette. But, don't hold me to that.

As far as herbs go, you can use sage, thyme, cilantro, basil (all different kinds), dill, marjoram, oregano, fennel, spring onion, lavender, lemon thyme and so on. Try different combinations. The only wrong way to make an omelette is to burn it. :)
I think that both chervil and tarragon are much under appreciated in this country nowadays. I love both herbs and wouldn't consider making a "traditional" french omelet without at least one of these.
 
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I think that both chervil and tarragon are much under appreciated in this country nowadays.
Here in the UK I'd say chervil is almost non-existent for home cooks unless they grow it. UK chefs on TV sometimes use it but its not sold in supermarkets. Tarragon however, is available in most supermarkets here quite easily, but is probably underrated too. Its a magical herb - and you don't need much to transform a dish - particularly a French herb omelette. :)
 
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Yes this thread is old but I have a simple question about the use of chervil and tarragon: Are both used together or independently of one another???
 

pete

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Yes this thread is old but I have a simple question about the use of chervil and tarragon: Are both used together or independently of one another???
Personally, I feel that you could use just 1 or the other, but if you wanted to be truly "classic" you would use "fine herbs" which is a mix of chives, parsley, tarragon and chervil.
 
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Use both, but use tarragon sparingly and chervil in quantity. Chervil is very delicate and subtle; tarragon slaps you in the face. As someone has said, though, you'll probably have to grow your own chervil. Fortunately, it has this amazing property that it actually likes shade, so grow lots of it everywhere your other herbs won't grow.
 
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