What and how do I add other things like apples to porkchops?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by spicyfood, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. spicyfood

    spicyfood

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    I have been getting thicker cut porkchops lately. The first time i ever cooked a thick porkchop or a porkchop on the pan it came out very good. I have cousher salt and pepper wholes, i push it inside of the porkchops and then I cook each side for 2 minutes then flip to the original side add butter and start basting non-stop for 3-4 mins on each side.

    Today I tried cooking it with apples but it didn't work. I chopped a few apple chucks and threw it into the pan expecting it to melt so I could use it with the butter to baste with. The apple chunks did not melt, and the porkchop has a very faint if any apple taste to it. Which I'm not sure if its just my mind playing tricks on me because its so subtle.

    So my question is wtf do I do to make veggies and fruits flavor soak in. And what kind of stuff do I add to porkchops besides salt and pepper? The only thing I could think of is apple because in old cartoons you'd see an apple in the roasted pigs mouth. But idk If I like the flavor although its too faint to even taste. IS there any bitter things I can add to porkchops being cooked on a pan, or spicy? And how do I add them. I figured next time I'll chop thin slices and lay them on the porkchops but I'm not sure.


    Edit: Heres a picture (I know it looks terrible but tastes good and textures good)

    [​IMG]
     
  2. spicyfood

    spicyfood

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    Also can you over cook porkchops? The past two days I made them they came out really juicy like a turky. But then today the slightly thinner maybe 1/2inch thinner porkchops came out less juicy. Cooked same exact time, and rested for same time. Just had apples in todays batch and they were slightly thinner. So maybe over cooking = less juice?


    After "boiling" my porkchops I was under the impression the longer you cook anything the more tender it gets, but on the pan that seems to be countrary.
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Thicker chops cooked in the same and time as thinner chops will be rarer in the center and juicier. For thinner chops you have to cook them a shorter time to end up at the same doneness.

    When you're sauteing a chop or cutlet, there isn't a lot of time for much flavor to get into the food compared to a braise or roast. You can braise and roast chops to a degree, they also cook pretty fast even in those methods.

    Try building a sauce with something like apple butter.

    For thick chops you might consider an apple based stuffing. For a saute you can get crispy dried apples and grind them to powder. Season your chop with that. Be careful, it's basically concentrated fruit sugar and it'll scorch and burn easily. Sous vide would be a better technique for the powdered apples probably. Especially with the longer cooking time that is possible with sous vide.
     
  4. spicyfood

    spicyfood

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    I'm assuming sauteing is cooking on the pan. What you're telling me is there isn't much I can do to really add flavor to the porkchops when cooking on the pan, besides adding like a glaze or some kind of special seasoning before hand.

    I've thought about that, and thought about the different kinds of butter I could use. (may sound strange but I never heard of apple butter I'll have to look into it) But the only thing that really caught my attention is maybe making a glaze with alcohol, but everything I've seen on it says I have to cook it outside which isn't possible for me.

    Maybe this should of been in the recipes section, but is there any good bitter glazes or seasonings I could add to my pan cooked porkchops? I really like using steak sauce but the porkchops taste really good on their own and steak sauce is too overpowering. I may google for things besides apples I can use like you said, crisping then grinding into powder.



    EDit: How "rare" can my chops be? What color because I actually had some parts of my chop ever so slightly pink the first few days I cooked when it was super juicy, I figured aw fuck it i wont die. But I know porkchops have to be cooked well done or they can get you sick.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    For chops, I target 140. If you stuff, that can require a higher temp depending on the stuffing.

    Get an instant read thermometer. Important piece of kit.
     
  6. someday

    someday

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    Pork chops are find cooked medium rare-medium. Cooking them well done is an outdated method/way of thinking due to something called "trichinosis" which is a parasite that used to infect pork before meat industry standards were adopted. There is almost zero risk of trich in commercial raised pork. If you raised your own pigs the risk is greater. There are something like 20 cases per year in the US. If your pork is pink you'll be fine.

    If you want to get apple and other flavors into pork chops you should use a brine. Some combination of apple cider, maple, molasses, salt, herbs, etc should get the job done. Just be careful with the sugar to not burn the chop too much when you sear.
     
  7. spicyfood

    spicyfood

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    Can I brine on a pan or will it explode everywhere? I guess I was brining or boiling porkchops in the oven, it would taste like whatever sauces I used. But I really like the pan cooked thick chops now, can't go back.

    Also how pink are we talking? I like my steaks redish pink. Rare or medium rare.
     
  8. someday

    someday

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    What? I don't know what you mean by exploding...if your pork chops are exploding you've got other issues not covered in your original post.

    A brine is a salt/sugar/flavoring solution that you submerge the chops in for a period of 8-24 hours. You then remove them and cook as normal. This will draw seasoning and flavor into the chop through osmosis. I don't really feel like typing up an explanation for you right now but a quick google search will give you plenty of recipes to choose from and, if you want, plenty of information on brining and how/why it works. Sometimes it can make a piece of pork taste a bit "hammy" but I personally like that. Just watch the salt...

    Your pork can still be quite pink and be OK. I cook my pork loins and tenderloins to about 135, and I wouldn't personally go over 140.
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Hello @spicyfood and welcome to cheftalk. Based on some of your questions and cooking methods I think some of the suggestions others made to you are great but a bit advanced, or at least not explained well enough. I am guessing English might not be your first language because you ask for a "bitter recipe" which is not a common way of referring to food. I think you might mean savoury, or not sweet. Am I right?

    Cooking porkchops, with or without the bone, in a pan is my favorite way of making porkchops. The technique is pretty simple and there are many ways to change the flavors every time. There are so many different flavor combinations that you could do here and I like to have sauce with pork, I cook it to medium well so it is slightly pink and needs a little sauce. Here is my technique for 1-inch thick boneless porkchops:

    1. Wash the porkchops and dry thoroughly on paper towels. The meat must not be wet or it will not create a good sear.
    2. Use a heavy pan, or cast iron pan and put it to heat up. The pan must be very hot before the meat goes in. Put oil in the pan.
    3. While that's warming up season your pork with salt and pepper.
    4. Place in the pan and don't move it around. Leave it in there for 2 minutes and then turn it over for 2 minutes.
    5. Remove the pork from the pan and leave it aside on a plate somewhere. It's not cooked yet but now it's time to make some sauce.
    6. In the pan now you add aromatics and herbs and spices and whatever you like to make a sauce. I like to add some sliced garlic and allow it to cook gently. Then I deglaze the pan with a bit of white wine or vermouth. Then you I add a little chicken stock or even water, about half a cup. Some lemon juice too and toss in fresh sage and oregano. Allow that to reduce a little a little bit. Add some salt.
    7. Put the pork chops back in, a pat of butter and close the lid. Let the chops cook in there until they are cooked medium or however you like your pork done.
    8. Serve! The sauce is very nice too and can be drizzled on rice, potatoes, vegetables too.

    During step 6 is when you would start to change all the flavorings.

    For apple flavors
    - diced apples
    - thyme
    - apple cider or brandy
    - orange juice
    - cinammon
    - nutmeg

    Dijon (this is great for chicken too)
    - shallots
    - lemon juice
    - white wine
    - dijon mustard
    - butter
    - dill

    Creamy
    - mushrooms
    - garlic
    - thyme
    - white wine
    - heavy cream
    - butter
    - cracked pepper

    Red sauce
    - chopped tomatoes
    - chili flakes
    - red wine
    - onions
    - chopped black olives
    - fresh parsley
     
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  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Without brining you really aren't going to bring a lot of flavor into your pork chop, but you can easily make a "pan" sauce to serve with your chops. There are numerous flavors that go well with pork, but if you would like to keep with an apple flavor, this is what I often do:

    After I cook my pork chops I remove them from the pan and while they rest I make the sauce. Add a bit of butter to your pan, if there isn't much oil left. Saute a bit of minced shallot, along with some apples that have been peeled and diced. Do this over high heat to get a bit of color, but don't burn the shallot. I then add a bottle hard cider and just a splash of cider vinegar and let that reduce by about 2/3's. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in about 4-5 tablespoons of butter. I then add just a bit of fresh sage, chopped, and the pork chops. I let it sit for 2-3 minutes, off of the heat to warm the chops up again, then serve, with the sauce spooned over the chops.
     
  11. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    The key to keeping the tenderness is not letting the moisture in the meat boil.
     
  12. halb

    halb

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    We serve grilled pork chops with a peach mango salsa topping. Wouldn't take much to come up with an apple salsa. You might want to consider something like that instead of trying to make the chop itself taste like apple. And yes, you don't want to cook pork beyond 140 otherwise it can be tough. Pink is the way it's supposed to be.
     
  13. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Lean pork not past 140. Other cuts need more time and heat.
     
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