Wedding for 150 people...how many Shrimp?

Discussion in 'Professional Catering' started by m crawford, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. m crawford

    m crawford

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    I am catering a wedding for 150 people. We will serve BBQ brisket, brochette shrimp, crawfish étouffée and jambalaya (chicken and sausage). Most of my catering has been BBQ so my biggest concern is how many shrimp to serve and how much étouffée. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. 
     
  2. elitecatering

    elitecatering

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    First off everything sounds delicious.  I would go with 15 lbs. of 31-35 count (large) shrimp and 5 lbs. of bacon cut in half or thirds for wrapping the shrimp (use the thin cheap bacon, it wraps easier).  That's 3-4 large wrapped shrimp per person. Because you are serving very hearty dishes I wouldn't go crazy on shrimp. Etouffee is served on rice so that will bulk up the portions. I would go with 2-3 crawfish per person and 1/4 cup of cooked rice. Hope that helps. Now I'm hungry.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
  3. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I would use 16 to 20   Tigers as they are more impressive;  Lay out 1/2 slices bacon on parchment, sprinkle with bread crumbs lightly this stops shrimp from sliding out and makes it easier to wrap 20 lbs should do it  that's about 360 shrimp . estouffee  and Jamba are heavy and fillingh and bothserved with rice  plain rice and dirty rice
     
  4. durangojo

    durangojo

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    I agree with using a 16/20 sized shrimp. You will make yourself insane wrapping 450 smaller sized shrimp...the cost is not that much more for the 16/20....at least not wholesale. I actually don't consider 31/35 to be large shrimp...to me they are medium. I also think that the shrimp will be overcooked before the bacon is done if using a smaller shrimp.
    Make sure that your bacon is very cold when wrapping the shrimp...it tends to pull apart when it gets too warm and almost becomes unmanageable....even the warmth from your hands affects it, so don't pull all the bacon out all at once.

    joey
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2014
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  5. durangojo

    durangojo

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    As far as amounts go, shrimp on a buffet is like crack, bacon wrapped shrimp on a buffet is a speedball and everyone's an addict! Unsupervised, it could be suicide! What does your shrimp budget allow for, $1000.00? I would allow 2 1/2 -3 pp and definitely have someone serving it. I soo urge you to have staff serving all the mains on the buffet for many reasons....numero uno being portion control, then ease, smoothness and efficiency of feeding a lot of guests relatively quickly, as well as the constant lovely appearance of the food. That and its always nice to be served. Simply put, everything just goes smoother, questions get answered, and guests get taken care of better. After serving the buffet servers can help clear plates, leaving one or two at the buffet to serve the second go rounders.
    joey
    and put the bacon wrapped shrimp at the end of the hot line....last chafer before the salads.
     
  6. m crawford

    m crawford

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    The event went very well. Thanks for the advise about shrimp. I did use 16-20 and they were a big hit as was everything else. I have always had luck with the jambalaya is always a hit when I cater and helps fill everyone up. 
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  7. m crawford

    m crawford

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    chefedb...I noticed you referred to jambalaya being served over dirty rice...I have never heard of that. I always believed that jambalaya is not a sauce at all. Rather the entire item is cooked with the rice rather then poured over rice. I add all the ingredients then add raw rice directly and it all cooks together. Anyway, thats the way I learned to make it in New Orleans, but this is a big country and everyone does it their own way. Thanks again for the help, I appreciate it. This is a great site that I will return to often for advise.