Washing Chef Coats

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by lukeygina, Feb 23, 2006.

  1. lukeygina

    lukeygina

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    What is the best way to wash your chef coat if your linen service doesn't do it? I wash mine at home and it still doesn't get all the stainds out. I was just wondering if there are any good tips or suggestions.. Thanks chefs...
     
  2. siserilla

    siserilla

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    A friend of mine told me about this. I'm assuming your coats are white. First she soaks them in Mean green (it's a degreaser, that might not be the right name). Then she sprays some bleach on them and she washes them in bleach as well and they always come out looking great.
     
  3. markv

    markv

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    Yeah I'm a big bleach fan even though there will inevitably be some stains that are not of this world and resistant to even divine intervention.

    I soak mine in bleach & water first for 15-20 minutes and then wash them.

    Mark
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Bleach works, but it also weakens the fabric very quickly. I use Oxyclean, let it soak in the washer overnight, then run it on the long cycle.
     
  5. jolly roger

    jolly roger Banned

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    I know this can be expensive, but having them professionally cleaned is the best and most effective. Depending on your place in the kitchen (can guests see you?), you may be able to either get your restaurant to help with the costs or ask if you and the other cooks can have coat service included with the linen service. Many linen companies offer this as a service. The smart-*** in me would also suggest that you wear your apron in such a way that the apron takes the brunt of abuse through your shift. Sometimes, I would wear two aprons, one the normal way and a second folded down and around my waist when I would work broil station.
     
  6. panini

    panini

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    I agree with foodpump. The bleach is very distructive. It will cut the life of you jackets in half and if they are not 100 cxotton will eventually gray the stain in.
    He also mentioned oxyclean. My crew now swears buy that. It's now in sams and such and I hear it's economical. We deal with some pretty good stains.
    Oh, for blood, hydogen Peroxide.
    The best answer to this question is to get yourself into a position where you're not getting dirty:D
     
  7. shahar

    shahar

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    Don't forget the smells. I soak in oxy over night. Wash with oxy and regular detergent. Than wash again in baking soda to deodorize. Once every two months add a bleach cycle.
    BTW you got two flaps on that jacket. One for kitchen and one for guests...
     
  8. even stephen

    even stephen

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    If you have bad stains, throw your jacket away. When I was
    younger I used to keep a bucket of water and dishwashing
    detergent on the back porch. Every night I would just
    stuff them down into the mixture and let them soak for
    at least the night. Oxy Clean works well also. Of course
    you can always dye them if you work in that type of place.
     
  9. markv

    markv

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    We'll find a common ground some day Panini.

    Mark
     
  10. blueschef

    blueschef

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    I usually have a few "utility" jackets for cooking and then some nice jackets to change into to be in view of the guest. I always felt the laundry service does the best job, and if you own your own jackets they seem to last longer with the linnen service.
     
  11. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    One that no one mentioned is treating them with a stain stick when you get home. Hit them with some Spray & Wash or stain stick when you get home so the stains don't have a chance to set beofre you wash them. Someone also mentioned a bucket with water and detergent. That also works. Anything from letting the stain dry and set into the fabric. Bleaching works, but as stated before shortens the life of your jackets somewhat, though, as a line dog, I usually replaced my jackets after a year of use anyway. The other thing that bleach does is it strips the blue out of your whites leaving your jackets looking a dingy, off white yellow. That can be counteracted by treating your jackets with a "blueing" agent, found in the detergent aisle. It puts the blue back into your whites making them brilliant once again.
     
  12. dinerminer

    dinerminer

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    Getting stains out is one thing, preventing them is another. A heavy dose a starch while ironing will help prevent many stains and give you a crisp image. Also use the bib on the apron if you have that kind. A lot of chefs these days are going to darker colors that don't stains as well.
     
  13. panini

    panini

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    MarkV,
    :lol: :roll: :bounce: Didn't notice.
    I appreciate the blueing tip,Pete. The crew was looking a little dingy. Thought it was the lights.
    shahar, ney,ney:chef: Your left side should always be closest to you and cover the heart.
     
  14. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    alittle off the subject but still coat related, I had my logo sewn on my latest show coat....after washing the logo moved closer to my arm pit and is not as visable.....next coat will be washed prior to embroidery.
     
  15. aprilb

    aprilb

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    It works like literal pfm on wine and coffee stains on the rug, I can't imagine it not working on something more basic like whites.

    Believe it or not men's body wash rubbed into specific oil stains works great too. I got this tip from my son, who is a trucker and deals with all kinds of oil stains including diesel almost daily.

    I tried it on some grease stains on a particularly problematic t-shirt (a colored one at that) and voila.

    April
     
  16. rat

    rat

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    A while ago before I started having my coats dry cleaned by my job, I used simple green after I had worn the coats, I sprayed it on the bad spots and let it sit until It was time to do the wash. I also love oxyclean, it works extremely well and will not destroy your coats like bleach will.
     
  17. chrose

    chrose

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    A long time ago a dry cleaner I know told me to wash it in dishwasher detergent.
    I don't recall if I tried it though.
     
  18. chefkory

    chefkory

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    I bet your thinking Simple Green! It works wonders! It is also a great kitchen cleaner! It takes the the grease off of anything! It is still around I pick mine up at Home Depot. It keeps getting harder to find! But they have it!
     
  19. chef.assassin

    chef.assassin

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    when i was in culinary school, my butchery teacher swore by this method: make a paste of the dishwasher detergent and water, then rub it into the stains well. do this as soon as you can. then take it home and soak the coat in a solution of dish detergent and water. the next morning, obliterate any lingering stains with a bleach pen, then throw everything into the washer.
     
  20. elakin

    elakin

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    another advocate of dishwasher detergent. cascade powder, specifically.

    someone i worked with turned me on to soaking coats in cascade powder mixed with water overnight, and then washing them normally in the washing machine. works like a charm. coats get so white they kind of glow....

    it even gets out those carbon stains you get from carrying sheetpans on your shoulder.