Want to put this on the menu but...

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by socalcheffen, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    Hello everyone, new guy to the forum here but long time lurker /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

    I'm a Chef in SoCal and I'm doing a new menu and want to add a butter poached Filet Mignon. Now I've done this in personal settings for a few people at a time but was wondering how you guys would prep this for a mid to high volume setting where I could get orders for anywhere from 1 to 20 at a time? Would you pre-poach the steaks to a certain temp ahead of service and then re-heat to order? If so how would you reheat? Steam? Roast? or just re-poach? 

    Would you just poach steaks to order? Seems like that could get complicated pretty fast if you got more than a few orders at a time.

    Sorry if this seems like a stupid question but I've never done these on a menu before where I could potentially have quite a few working at the same time and speed and efficiency would be of the essence!

    Thanks!
     
  2. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    *shrugs*... doesnt matter so much how many at a time so long as your cooking and rotation techniques get them on and

    off when theyre done. Speaking of which, I would personally avoid reheating of any kind or even "holding" and bringing up

    to order on such a cut as Mignon, partly because it shouldnt take long to bring it to internal serving temp. I think you

    can do many quickly once you have the rhythm down. What thicknesses are you anticipating?

    That's my initial take on it, various and assorted Pros in here may have a different perspective--the night is still young!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  3. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    Hey meez thanks for the input... I'm curious to see what responses I get or if the general consensus will echo the same thing you said...
     
  4. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    Hey meez thanks for the input... I'm curious to see what responses I get or if the general consensus will echo the same thing you said...
     
  5. thetincook

    thetincook

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    This application is what sous vide is designed for.
     
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  6. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    Definitely... Unfortunately an immersion circulator isn't even a slight possibility...
     
  7. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    EASY ANSWER     If you can't do it right, then don't do it !
     
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  8. someday

    someday

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    Well, I'll spare you a dad lecture on why this probably isn't a good idea, and try and help. 

    You need to make a lot of buerre monte. If you don't know what that is, then you probably shouldn't do this technique. You need a big pan of that. Over a low burner. You need a calibrated thermometer. 

    I don't know what to tell you. You might run into trouble if you have multiple orders come in, different temps, and have to keep track of which steaks are which temp as they all sit in the butter. Sounds like a nightmare. 

    Maybe you will get a dad lecture after all :)

    Setting aside the reasoning (or lack thereof?) of butter poaching a beef tenderloin (why, oh why?), you might find it easier to do a sous vide technique without a circulator, as opposed to trying to keep butter a stable temp without breaking. Like, vac seal your beef with butter, and poach in a temp controlled pot of water in the back. Or maybe a crockpot set up on the side of the station. 

    You would use less butter too (butter is expensive). If you don't have a vac sealer...then...? I dunno...drop a 100 dollars on a food saver?

    Um...I'm just spit balling here. 

    Honestly it sounds like a nightmare. You can get away with doing this with fish because fish is a little more forgiving (in general) of temp, you have to cook fish au point and not to a specific temp (again, in general), and fish cooks a lot quicker than beef. So setting up a pot of oil/butter/duckfat to poach fish in is a lot more practical than doing it for beef. 

    I don't see it working without a proper sous vide setup...but hey. Now I'm curious, let us know how it goes. Dunno if I helped, so, yeah, sorry. 
     
  9. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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  10. arugula

    arugula

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    I'm with someday. This will be a nightmare without a sauvee. Not to mention the cost your going to have to price this idem at considering all the waste.
     
  11. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    what waste?...meat butter is awesome on veg.

    I was part of a Chef 2Student fundraiser last fall and a couple of the chefs took bricks of grassfed sirloin, searred them and then dropped them into the butter/water bath.....our service time changed repeatedly....so they hung out in approx 110* butter for a couple of hours (+/-)   Put back on the burner, back in the butter.....rested sliced.....BEST beef I've had in a long time.  Did I say grassfed no marbling.

    So that was a set event.   But I'm betting you could come up with the same type scenerio....find a space that holds a constant low temp, sear the beef and leave it in the butter.....pull out and cook more if they want it more done than rare/med rare.
     
  12. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    glad you chimed in... you are right, there definitely wouldn't be any waste as Beurre monte has many uses and can be repurposed rather easily especially if a menu is designed with that in mind. I like your suggestions so thanks for that... I appreciate everyone's input. The reason I really want to do this is because at the tasting that got me the job I did a butter poached filet mignon... the poaching liquid was a Beurre monte infused with miso and roasted garlic... Knocked em dead! Everyone loved the flavor and texture... therefore I wanted to make this work on a daily basis as part of a revamped modernized menu...I haven't pulled the trigger yet though.
     
  13. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    Btw some of you may have noticed I'm having some issues getting my posts out the way I want them to read... I'm having some problems getting them out correctly from my iPhone... bear with me!          /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif   
     
  14. brandon odell

    brandon odell

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    Two ideas:

    Hold in butter at exactly 120 degrees until needed, then bring up to temp to order

    or

    Do medallions instead of steaks and DO NOT offer temps on the medallions
     
  15. someday

    someday

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    Well, I was in no way suggesting that it COULDN'T be done, it just seems like it would be hard to finesse during a busy service, and there may be too many variables to control. I mean, if your beurre monte breaks in the middle of a busy service that can bring the whole line to a standstill for a bit while the cook makes more--not to mention the overcooked steaks. 

    Again, sous vide would be your friend in this application, but you already know that. 

    If you are set on doing it, maybe run it as a special for a few nights to work out the kinks and see if it is truly workable in your environment. That way, if it doesn't work, you can 86 it and no long term harm done (like, it's not printed on your menu everyday). 

    By the way, miso-garlic-butter poached fish sounds awesome--you should try that someday if you don't do the beef. 
     
  16. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    Brandon, someday

    again thanks for the suggestions! Brandon I really like the idea of doing medallions and NOT offering temps... I wish I'd thought of that!

    Someday, the idea of running the butter poached filet as a special and working out the kinks is a great way to introduce something new and gauge reaction as well as fine tune production/execution of said special... actually the miso/garlic butter poached fish that you mentioned might be a much better idea than beef... I was actually thinking about this earlier today and I think fish would pick up the intended flavors much better than beef... maybe Halibut? Possibly Arctic Char?
     
  17. rupertronco

    rupertronco

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    The beef dish is awesome. I've done similar preparations.  There's really no chance you can budget in a circulator? They can be had at a fairly reasonable price (around $500) via an infamous internet auction site. You don't have to spring for a chamber vac, you can definitely get by with a more economical sealer. It seems to be the ideal solution. I'm certain that you expect perfection from this dish. Both from a cost standpoint, and a personal one, it's a dish that has to be executed with zero tolerance. However, if you have a holding cabinet that has a decent recovery time, and consistent temperature control, they can be used for sous vide cooking fairly well. Just dump a boatload of buerre monte in a deep half, and keep a thermometer in the pan to ensure your temp isn't fluctuating too much, and you're good to go.

    As far as the fish goes: Char has a distinct flavor that I would personally seek to showcase, rather than dull with butter, or try to infuse additional flavors into (just my take). Halibut seems like a better choice, but I'm in love with the way halibut sears, so I would try to make that possible to finish.
     
  18. pirate-chef

    pirate-chef

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    sous vide pro. you can pick them up for really cheap and it is a sealed unit. honestly for the money it would possibly be worth it to front the cash use it to show the worth then ask to be reimbursed or take it home. 
     
  19. socalcheffen

    socalcheffen

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    I'm actually going to bring up the idea of an immersion circulator tomorrow and explain its worth as well as the different preparations I would be able to do and see how it is received.
     
  20. amusee

    amusee

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    I feel like u really need the circulator for this dish for speed and consistency. With the circulator sous vide the filet butter herbs? maybe and you can cook them to rare before service. I found from room temp (we take a few out at a time) it takes about 4 min in the broiler to come to mr + time to rest of course. The best is that it's almost impossible to overcook the meat while its in the circulator which means you don't have to worry about each piece. Good luck!!