Want a better chocolate

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by momoreg, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I have used Callebaut for years, and my primary needs (at this point) are for ganache, and bitter choc. for baking. That said, I probably don't need the absolute finest eating chocolate, but I do want one with excellent flavor, under $6/#.

    I'd like to change to a fair trade brand, who also sells in bulk (50# cases). Not candy bars. I have samples of Dagoba and Plantation (I actually don't remember the price on the Dagoba), and the Plantation was FLAT tasting and disappointing. The Dagoba was quite good, but again, I haven't done a lot of research on it yet.

    Does anyone here have any advice for others?
     
  2. panini

    panini

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    Momo
    can you explain the term a fair trade brand?
    pan
     
  3. momoreg

    momoreg

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  4. chef.assassin

    chef.assassin

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    i once worked at a place which was organic/fair trade, and we used dagoba for everything. it is a lovely chocolate and was versatile enough to perform well in every aspect.
     
  5. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Thanks, chefassasin. So far it's the winner.
     
  6. cyngawel

    cyngawel

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    I second (or third?) the Dagoba. Their Conacado is fair trade (I'm not sure if all their varietals are fair trade). I use the drops for chocolate chunk cookies; I love them. I also use it to make confections. Good stuff.
     
  7. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    Have you tried El Rey?
    It tends to be a little trickier to temper because it is not conched for as long as most european chocolates, but I love the single bean varieties and its elemental flavor. The white chocolate is really worth trying.
    While their website http://www.chocolates-elrey.com/ says nothing about their fair trade status, I have spoken to some of their execs and reps and it looks as though much of the cocoa is grown and processed by worker and farm cooperatives that look out for and protect the farmer and employee.