Walking off a job with no notice .... your thoughts?

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Joined May 1, 2019
Of course! But mngmt and sales are different from production, which is what most cooks are.

Not saying that “devices” aren’t useful in the kitchen, for looking up recipies, videos or pics of techniques or processes, or calculating.

My issue is one of addiction, because I seem to recognize that many younger employees can’t go 20 minutes without checking up on social media, and this has nothing to do with work. Once again I stress that what you do on your break time is your business, but if you have to check on social media every 20 mins, or have “alerts” every ten mins, while doing production work you have an addiction problem.
You just work with lazy asses don't let those people paint the picture of the working class for this Gen. .
 
5,448
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Yeah, I know. Problem is, every place I work at it’s the same problem, with a maybe 10% exception rate. I love working with the 10% ers though.

Then again, I still haven’t deleted my dash-cam footage of this ( deleted) eejit who was texting while skateboarding. For the sake of anyone in any generation I Hope said ejit is the exception...
 
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Joined Dec 23, 2004
Taken as a whole no generation alive today has less to gain from their hard work than the youth of today. If there ever was any loyalty from employers [spoiler alert- there wasn't] then it's completely gone today. As the industry consolidates behind big chains and private equity funds the worker's share of the productivity gains will fall even further than it already has. When burger flipping robots get cheap enough- and they already are for some businesses- then the cook is out on her ass. CEOs are making a killing while the inflation-adjusted wages of workers hasn't increased since I was born over 50 years ago. If you cook in the USA, count on no pension, no benefits, no paid sick leave and little to room for advancement. Yeah, one in 50 of those young cooks will pour their life's blood into it and work their way up to making an upper-lower class living after ten or fifteen years of sacrificing everything and putting in 70 hour weeks.

Right now the industry has been skating by surviving on the Protestant work ethic, using people up and tossing them aside, wringing out what they can before the kids realize they're getting virtually nothing in exchange for their work. It's going to be a hard sell as people begin to figure it out. As we move further down the path of the "Bullshit Job Economy" it's going to tough to convince a kid to work 12 hours on his feet in 100 degree heat to make $5/hr less than they'd make in a call center.

If we want to get some passion and commitment out of Gen Z we will probably have to earn it for a change.
 
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Joined May 1, 2019
Yeah, I know. Problem is, every place I work at it’s the same problem, with a maybe 10% exception rate. I love working with the 10% ers though.

Then again, I still haven’t deleted my dash-cam footage of this ( deleted) eejit who was texting while skateboarding. For the sake of anyone in any generation I Hope said ejit is the exception...
You need to post that!! Did he fall!? Yes most these kids have had everything handed to them i see it with my siblings they are little pieces of shite. Our problem as the younger youth we expect to be at the top without putting the hard work and learning all the ins and outs of the industry we are participating in. #ENTITLED
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Hi Phaedrus,

That was one heckuva post, and I agree with a large portion of it.
However, the people I work with—those in between 18 and 40 are not lazy, they do work hard, it’s just that many can’t work 2 hours without checking on social media. I don’t get upset when they whip out and stare at their phones while waiting for an elevator at work, but I do get upset when I find them perched on a mayo bucket in the walk in, texting.

The industry in n.america is crap because there are no standards for the industry to adhere to. wages are crap because their are no standards or qualifications for cooks—or for servers. Nothing will change until standards are introduced. In some of the first world countries I’ve worked in the above standards are the prerogative of gov’ts and trade unions. Then again I still can’t comprehend how many States can a have a minimum wage, and yet still have a “tipping wage” far, far, far below that standard minimum wage.
 
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Joined Dec 23, 2004
I think things are probably a bit better for workers overall where you live, foodpump. The majority of the unwashed masses in the USA live hand-to-mouth, paycheck-to-paycheck with virtually no security. Our system kind of requires it- we have the carrot of potential wealth no matter how unlikely and the stick of becoming homeless and destitute if we take our foot off the gas pedal for even a moment.

But the phone thing...yeah, I see that too. People are conditioned to feel like they're drowning if they don't check their social media every fifteen minutes. Of course those platforms were designed that way to maximize ad revenue and profits for Facebook, TikTok, Instagram and probably a dozen other platforms I'm too old and uncool to be able to name. :rofl:

Standards and qualifications would perhaps help but the bigger issue is that over 50% of all the wealth of the US in concentrated in the hands of a couple dozen people. Interestingly while millions of food service workers lost their jobs during the pandemic, eight billionaires in the US saw their combined net worth increase by half a trillion dollars! It's fast becoming a zero sum game in the US.
 
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
Taken as a whole no generation alive today has less to gain from their hard work than the youth of today. If there ever was any loyalty from employers [spoiler alert- there wasn't] then it's completely gone today. As the industry consolidates behind big chains and private equity funds the worker's share of the productivity gains will fall even further than it already has. When burger flipping robots get cheap enough- and they already are for some businesses- then the cook is out on her ass. CEOs are making a killing while the inflation-adjusted wages of workers hasn't increased since I was born over 50 years ago. If you cook in the USA, count on no pension, no benefits, no paid sick leave and little to room for advancement. Yeah, one in 50 of those young cooks will pour their life's blood into it and work their way up to making an upper-lower class living after ten or fifteen years of sacrificing everything and putting in 70 hour weeks.

Right now the industry has been skating by surviving on the Protestant work ethic, using people up and tossing them aside, wringing out what they can before the kids realize they're getting virtually nothing in exchange for their work. It's going to be a hard sell as people begin to figure it out. As we move further down the path of the "Bullshit Job Economy" it's going to tough to convince a kid to work 12 hours on his feet in 100 degree heat to make $5/hr less than they'd make in a call center.

If we want to get some passion and commitment out of Gen Z we will probably have to earn it for a change.

Fantastic post, thank you.

However, the people I work with—those in between 18 and 40 are not lazy, they do work hard, it’s just that many can’t work 2 hours without checking on social media. I don’t get upset when they whip out and stare at their phones while waiting for an elevator at work, but I do get upset when I find them perched on a mayo bucket in the walk in, texting.

How do you feel about smokers and smoke breaks? A lot of older people I've worked with feel entitled to take a 10-15 minute smoke break every couple of hours while working. How is popping a squat on a bucket in the walk in fundamentally different than popping a squat outside on a milk crate and having a smoke?
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
For me, whatever you do on your break is your business. If you want to have a smoke, do it on your break and don’t leave your butts behind.

This has been policy in virtually any place I work, and the only ones who don’t follow it are the ones in upper management. The ones that do abuse it and who aren’t in management were invariably disciplined
 
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Joined Apr 27, 2015
The industry in n.america is crap because there are no standards for the industry to adhere to. wages are crap because their are no standards or qualifications for cooks—or for servers. Nothing will change until standards are introduced. In some of the first world countries I’ve worked in the above standards are the prerogative of gov’ts and trade unions. Then again I still can’t comprehend how many States can a have a minimum wage, and yet still have a “tipping wage” far, far, far below that standard minimum wage.

Welcome to 21st century capitalism! Where (in America) a massage therapist who squirts some baby oil on someone's leg and rubs it, is more heavily, more ethically regulated, than an I.T. guy who is in charge of a billion patients' very personal health and financial information.

Industries that came of age after the dergulation boom of the 80s don't have the same kind of limitations put on themselves that older fields do. A bad lawyer can lose their license. But a bad computer guy or chef, can simply move on to the next client, wreaking havoc.

Unfortunately, I don't see this changing any time soon. Those with the money have the political power, and the ability to scream, "This will cost jerbs!" at the thought of more humane pay, ethics and competence standards for employees
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Well, yeah, but cooking since the ‘80’s? Cooking is the um, cough, second oldest profession in the world.

The time will come...

I remember working in Switzerland in the early ‘80’s. Employers ( Swiss hotels, mainly) were screaming for staff. Why didn’t people flock to their employees entrances like they did for the last 100 years? So they actually paid money to find out. The answer hurt, and they refused to acknowledge it at first, but gradually the big fat hotel owners were forced to acknowledge that every other industry in Switzerland worked a 5 day week, the hospitality industry didn’t. So it was that in 1982 the hospitality industry introduced a 5 day week,

Of course, in most parts of Asia hospitality workers still work a 6 day week in 2020...
 
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Joined Nov 9, 2020
Let me think about this... Yes. Twice.

One was a breakfast house where I was a potwasher/dishwasher, the owner was offensive, abusive, liked to curse out his employees... the bottom line was when he screamed at me (in the middle of breakfast service) "I pay you w€****k$ to take my abuse (mind you, none of us were hispanic), now shut your (deleted) pie hole up and get the (deleted) to work, you lazy (deleted), or leave". I left.

The other I worked as a line cook for an upscale breakfast/lunch place. I had been there less than a week, and went to set up the cold table for crepes / omlets - the reach in seemed not cold, and when I pulled covers off the 6th pans was left with maggot infested ham, rotten veggies, moldy cheese, etc. I checked the temp of the reach in, and when it went over 60 degrees (!!!) told the chef/owner we were in serious trouble, and needed to cancel brunch - he told me no way in (deleted), and I WAS going to use the condiments and serve this to the customers.

That was probably the only time I called the health department's emergency line on an employer. And I would do it again. Needless to say, his business lasted about 3 months, and was closed (with health dept warnings on the door) most of that.
 
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Joined Nov 9, 2020
I PRAYED for 6 day weeks... That said "you made it"... When I got a 5 day Sched (Tues to Sat Evenings in the seafood dinnerhouse) I was exstatic. THAT is what you hope for - not only to show Chef what you're made of, but the customers out there that YOU can make THEM happy campers!!! And the boss or owner recognizes YOU are a valued part of their team.

When I realized I was good enough to ask for 5 day weeks and got it I knew I had kinda sorta made it. When you're that good, you're that good. When I went to PT (Because I had a job that gave me benefits and a retirement package) and Chef said "Are you committed"... I asked him "Do you have a retirement package with health care?"... He thought about it, and said "OK, I understand".

Do I wish Foods gave me that option? Absolutely I do. But I also (thanks to an exec who brought me to reality) realized I needed to look out for me, and where I was was GREAT, but it wasn't gonna pay the bills when I was 70. So (at his advice) I got a career Civil Service job, got my retirement, and now I want to go back and rock some restaruant like it's standing still.

Back to the subject - you take EVERYTHING you can grab. And you make EVERYTHING you can out of it. KEEP LOOKING TO THE STARS, becauseif you have the love and the passion, you WILL make it - even IF you have to take a 30 year "hiatus" to make sure when you go back your butt is covered.

If you can't handle 6 day weeks, go elsewhere, because this isn't the life for you. This isn't for the money - AS ANY Chef will tell you (or any who is worth his or her salt), it's for the PASSION!!! And when you HAVE the passion, then you make the money.
 
120
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Joined May 1, 2019
Let me think about this... Yes. Twice.

One was a breakfast house where I was a potwasher/dishwasher, the owner was offensive, abusive, liked to curse out his employees... the bottom line was when he screamed at me (in the middle of breakfast service) "I pay you w€****k$ to take my abuse (mind you, none of us were hispanic), now shut your (deleted) pie hole up and get the (deleted) to work, you lazy (deleted), or leave". I left.

The other I worked as a line cook for an upscale breakfast/lunch place. I had been there less than a week, and went to set up the cold table for crepes / omlets - the reach in seemed not cold, and when I pulled covers off the 6th pans was left with maggot infested ham, rotten veggies, moldy cheese, etc. I checked the temp of the reach in, and when it went over 60 degrees (!!!) told the chef/owner we were in serious trouble, and needed to cancel brunch - he told me no way in (deleted), and I WAS going to use the condiments and serve this to the customers.

That was probably the only time I called the health department's emergency line on an employer. And I would do it again. Needless to say, his business lasted about 3 months, and was closed (with health dept warnings on the door) most of that.
What does being hispanic have to do with anything ?
 
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Joined Nov 9, 2020
What does being hispanic have to do with anything ?
To that guy, anyone working back of house was "hispanic" (tho he had other choice words for it) - that's why the "[email protected]" and "sp!ck" comment shouted by the owner with a front end full of customers... he thought all hispaics were lazy, selfish bums, so he decided "we" (as back of house) needed to be watched and ridden... because he decided if you worked back of house, you had to be hispanic. Plus he felt, as we were "untermenchen", he could scream profanities at us with abandon, as we well deserved it.

THAT'S what "hispanic" has to do with it. Hope you don't get to deal with a racist, mysognist and otherwise disgusting owner in your career...
 
5,448
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Hi L'uovo,
The comment about 6 day weeks in most parts of Asia has to be considered with monthly salaries in mind, as hourly wages are virtually unheard of there.

My personal motto/way of thinking about cooking ( and baking) is very simple :
" what I cook is for the customer, how I cook is for me"

Thus, if the owner/Chef works less hours than me, they don't earn my respect, if they refuse to invest in proper equipment and instead spend money on decor in the dining room, they dont earn my respect, if they insult or abuse staff, or b.s. them, they don't earn my respect, if a server gives me a bill with 4 modifiers on it and then in the course of the evening tells me how they'll buy a new iphone with the tips from that table and not even buy a pitcher of Pepsi for the kitchen, they don't earn my respect.

When this happens, I keep my head down, continue to produce quality, and in my free time look for a better job.

Maybe this pandemic will flush out all the crappy places, maybe it won't. Some CDN city Mayors have started to hassle delivery services like skip the dishes / uber eats and the like for charging a whopping 35% of the food prices for deliveries, not because they give a sh*t about the restaurants, but they know that restaurants pay 3-400 % more in property taxes , and the delivery services don't even have an office.
 
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