Walking off a job with no notice .... your thoughts?

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Joined Jul 28, 2001
chefross, you know the respect I've will always have for you.
respect for ones' self, I'm not so sure I'm on board. I view it
as a moral philosophy, just for me that included all those around you.
I have no problem walking of a job, but before I make that move I make sure I'm not putting an undo burden on other innocent people.
just my 2 cents

Someday, come on. Thats a knee jerk response. ethics is absorbed from your environment. I'm old, I have a 30 yr old who is my moral compass
Please reconsider, no one is blaming the younger generation. Their the product of this environment. Technology has moved so fast, family life has become so hectic. the aspect of family is becoming lost. Ethics,
edicate, things of that nature in my generation was mostly confirmed around the dinner table.

just sayin, certainly not arguing
 
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Joined May 25, 2015
I've known just as many, if not more, morally corrupt, lazy, entitled old people than I have people of my age or younger.

Absolutely, but unfortunately many of them are also quite successful because of those ethics. Consequently there are some of the younger generation that would emulate those ethics to get ahead.
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
I've known just as many, if not more, morally corrupt, lazy, entitled old people than I have people of my age or younger. You live in a bubble...time to pop it.


A-yup, this is true, and I work for some of them.

Thing is, if us oldies have issues the it’s only fair that young people have issues.

Now, take for example phones in the kitchen. No one over the age of 40 would dream of whipping out a phone while on the meat slicer or in the walk in to chat with their friends or check on their status on social media. No one over the age of 40 would plug in earphones while working in a hot busy kitchen—therefore completely ignorant of communication around them, or getting a hot sheet pan jammed in their backs, or a broom or mop up their orifice because they didn’t hear the command,“ behind you, you f#$&*-ing deaf eejit”.*


So yeah us old people have issues, Im the first to admit it. Can you, would you, care to admit young people have issues too? Or is one party totally evil and corrupt and the other so picture perfect that they pee lemonade and fart rainbows?

* both of these incidents happened last week with employees under the age of 25. It took all of my self control not to yank the ( deleted) phone out of their hands and toss it in the deep fryer... Alas, I am a crusty old fart...who doesn’t want to drive an eejit dripping blood all over my car to the Emerg...
 
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Joined Feb 18, 2007
Mostly I was wondering why people walk out on jobs - and if employers ever ask if they have and why. Or how often ghosting happens. If there's no accountability, it will keep happening (for a multitude of reasons.) I'm interviewing staff at the moment and this is a tight job market but people are still ghosting on interviews, stages... I've started to wish for a forum to warn people about candidates who've ghosted or employees who've walked out because if you aren't interested in pursuing the position, say so. Don't waste my time setting up an interview or a stage and then don't show. And if you walk out and leave your co-workers high and dry, as an employer, I'd want to know that - and why.
 
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Joined Feb 18, 2007
what foodpump said.

I let someone go because she picked up her phone to answer a text while we were discussing production. She was on her phone constantly; and not just for the calculator or timer; I'm paying you to work, not to work out on social media on my dime. That's what a break is for. Catch up with your friends on YOUR time, not my dime.
 
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Joined May 25, 2015
If there's no accountability, it will keep happening

What kind of accountability would you suggest?

... employees who've walked out because if you aren't interested in pursuing the position, say so.

You need to keep in mind that an interview and trial period is as much for the employee as it is for the employer. A prospective employee should be interviewing you at the same time to decide if what you are telling them is what they want to hear. After that, if they are hired there is no way to know the actual working conditions until they have been there for awhile.

I will say though that if a candidate decides to not keep an appointment for an interview, courtesy would dictate a phone call stating such. Likewise, if a new employee decides after a period of time that the job is not a good fit for them, the courteous thing to do would be to give notice.

And if you walk out and leave your co-workers high and dry, as an employer, I'd want to know that - and why.

If a long time employee just doesn't show up one day, you probably haven't been doing your job as an employer if you don't know why.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
Well, I may have taken a beating for my comment about personal responsibility, and I am not immune, as I did it twice in my career. I've had a long journey, both as an employee ,and as an employer. I genuinely see both sides. I've worked in some pretty badly managed places, as well as some really great ones.
For me....to end this, I'll just say that in order for someone to walk off a job they thought they loved, it has to be agonizing and frustrating to make that decision.
It stinks, and it's unfair, and everything else that goes along with it.
That being said, the restaurant industry, while it is vast, has along with it, a enduring theme that goes like this..."Don't burn your bridges at both ends."
 
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Joined Jul 7, 2019
Just my two cents...

I recently returned to a kitchen I left in a bit of a hurry. I think back in May I decided that enough was enough but instead of walking I pulled the manager into the kitchen and told him that if he does not get someone to come and replace me then service is going to go down the sh*tter.

He did and I packed my bags and left.

Then I applied for other jobs. One of which got back in touch right away, being eager I replied in less than thirty minutes with the dates I could go for trial, a few days later they got back in touch apologising for lack of response and new dates were agreed and then sure enough, a few days later I finally get confirmation that the dates were good but ultimately the position has been filled. Nearly two weeks of being messed about by a potential employer and being the vocal guy that I am, I made sure to tell them when they eventually got back in touch that no, I don't wish for my details to remain on file as they have shown themselves to be a company I no longer want to work for.

Long story short, the next place I went to (a hotel) wasn't the best and I lasted less than week as a prep chef before telling the head chef that it wasn't for me, it simply wasn't busy enough nor was I enjoying the laid back atmosphere. 8am-2pm then back for 6pm til 9.30pm Monday to Friday. It was chushy but not for me. I like to be on the go all the time. I texted former boss of the place I left and asked if a position opens up to be considered, a few hours later I had been rehired.

Sure it was poor form to leave so suddenly but my attitude and work ethic up until that point had been spot on throughout and allowed me the opportunity to return. Just as when I left I ensured I was right and true with my review of the place, I didn't bad mouth the business, instead I defended it and suggested things I would have done differently if given the chance when speaking to other employers.

Basically, it's a two way thing in my mind but walking off without a word or without giving a heads up isn't right. If I had to do it again I think I would have asked to finish for the day and just allow myself to calm down before jacking it in completely. Or at least get through the end of service and sleep on it.
 
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Joined May 4, 2005
Yup, did it about 4 mths ago.
I was working almost 2 years with the exec.
Chef of a 200 rm hotel, chronic alcoholic, hands shaking like a paint mixer every morning when he walked in. Started every sentence off with an excuse, and was never to be found during the day. Anyway, he like to call up his staff after work on their phones when he was sh*tfaced. First time I let it slide, second time I played my phone for the H.R., third time I by-passed the H.R. and went straight to the G.M.

Hey I think we had the same chef! He used to bring me personal documents in which he needed to sign, and have me to it for him because his hands were shaking so bad. It was his "blood sugar." Felt bad for the guy, you could tell he means well, but he had his demons. Had a seizure on the line on Thanksgiving Day.
 
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Joined Feb 8, 2009
I remember thinking over the years about being in a position when someone said to me, Come on, no one will know. I always thought to myself, I'll know. We all have to live with our decisions. We should also learn by them, hopefully before we get too far out of wack. I never walked out of a job because I knew how it felt to be walked out on. This business is hard enough on a good day. I have given my notice and then told to leave early. There isn't much loyalty in this business. In many cases you here stories about Chefs working many years in a kitchen only to be replaced by someone else. This is a business we need to be at the top of our game everyday. No one cares what we did yesterday. I remember thinking I was a bit depressed about ending my career. After a few weeks and over 30 years in this business I thought that it was better to leave on a high note. We all give so much to this profession. Make sure you leave it with the high moral standards that you have made you successful over the years........ChefBillyB
 
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Joined May 1, 2019
Mostly I was wondering why people walk out on jobs - and if employers ever ask if they have and why. Or how often ghosting happens. If there's no accountability, it will keep happening (for a multitude of reasons.) I'm interviewing staff at the moment and this is a tight job market but people are still ghosting on interviews, stages... I've started to wish for a forum to warn people about candidates who've ghosted or employees who've walked out because if you aren't interested in pursuing the position, say so. Don't waste my time setting up an interview or a stage and then don't show. And if you walk out and leave your co-workers high and dry, as an employer, I'd want to know that - and why.
I like to believe that things like that happen because of the lack of passion of the actual craft most people use kitchen work as means of pay no passion an integrity is put into it. Alot of people don't see cooking as an art
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
Just my two cents...

I recently returned to a kitchen I left in a bit of a hurry. I think back in May I decided that enough was enough but instead of walking I pulled the manager into the kitchen and told him that if he does not get someone to come and replace me then service is going to go down the sh*tter.

He did and I packed my bags and left.

Then I applied for other jobs. One of which got back in touch right away, being eager I replied in less than thirty minutes with the dates I could go for trial, a few days later they got back in touch apologising for lack of response and new dates were agreed and then sure enough, a few days later I finally get confirmation that the dates were good but ultimately the position has been filled. Nearly two weeks of being messed about by a potential employer and being the vocal guy that I am, I made sure to tell them when they eventually got back in touch that no, I don't wish for my details to remain on file as they have shown themselves to be a company I no longer want to work for.

Long story short, the next place I went to (a hotel) wasn't the best and I lasted less than week as a prep chef before telling the head chef that it wasn't for me, it simply wasn't busy enough nor was I enjoying the laid back atmosphere. 8am-2pm then back for 6pm til 9.30pm Monday to Friday. It was chushy but not for me. I like to be on the go all the time. I texted former boss of the place I left and asked if a position opens up to be considered, a few hours later I had been rehired.

Sure it was poor form to leave so suddenly but my attitude and work ethic up until that point had been spot on throughout and allowed me the opportunity to return. Just as when I left I ensured I was right and true with my review of the place, I didn't bad mouth the business, instead I defended it and suggested things I would have done differently if given the chance when speaking to other employers.

Basically, it's a two way thing in my mind but walking off without a word or without giving a heads up isn't right. If I had to do it again I think I would have asked to finish for the day and just allow myself to calm down before jacking it in completely. Or at least get through the end of service and sleep on it.

No offense but your first manager must have been desperate, I would have never hired you back.
 
726
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
Mostly I was wondering why people walk out on jobs - and if employers ever ask if they have and why. Or how often ghosting happens. If there's no accountability, it will keep happening (for a multitude of reasons.) I'm interviewing staff at the moment and this is a tight job market but people are still ghosting on interviews, stages... I've started to wish for a forum to warn people about candidates who've ghosted or employees who've walked out because if you aren't interested in pursuing the position, say so. Don't waste my time setting up an interview or a stage and then don't show. And if you walk out and leave your co-workers high and dry, as an employer, I'd want to know that - and why.
Yeah I always do phone interview and lay out all the basics of the job and compensation ahead of time so there are no surprises. If they agree to the terms I will bring them into an interview and I still get ghosted. I feel a lot of these people don't actually want jobs, just to be able to show the unemployment office they are applying to places. The food scene here has always been close knit and chefs will hear about people acting this way and it will unofficially blacklist people. So while your job may be horrible, I don't really see why people can't give notice, you may luck out and your boss will tell you to leave right then. People claim to be professionals and want to be treated like such but they need to act like it first.
 
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Joined Apr 27, 2015
I've known just as many, if not more, morally corrupt, lazy, entitled old people than I have people of my age or younger.

I think it has nothing to do with age. It's all about *empathy*. Some employers have it and some don't. Some know what it's like to go through the ring of fire and show more respect to up and comers, and others were born into privilege and never had to work their asses off just to have a place to sleep.

In my younger days I got shit on all the time by sociopathic bosses who used me like a commodity. I thought that was just how it goes. I also had bosses that were hard on me, but they also cared about me. It took me a long time to realize there's a big difference between the two.

Now that I'm older, I definitely meter my return consideration significantly based on the context. I don't know if that's wanting to inflict karma on people, or it's a function of having more freedom to do so? But ultimately I think you get what you give. And you give what you get. I'm less inclined to cut slack to somebody who wouldn't show me the same favor.
 
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
I think it has nothing to do with age. It's all about *empathy*. Some employers have it and some don't. Some know what it's like to go through the ring of fire and show more respect to up and comers, and others were born into privilege and never had to work their asses off just to have a place to sleep.

In my younger days I got shit on all the time by sociopathic bosses who used me like a commodity. I thought that was just how it goes. I also had bosses that were hard on me, but they also cared about me. It took me a long time to realize there's a big difference between the two.

Now that I'm older, I definitely meter my return consideration significantly based on the context. I don't know if that's wanting to inflict karma on people, or it's a function of having more freedom to do so? But ultimately I think you get what you give. And you give what you get. I'm less inclined to cut slack to somebody who wouldn't show me the same favor.

I'm not sure why you quoted me. My post was in direct response to someone who said something like "young people have no ethics" as if that blanket, absurd statement has any real meaning beyond an old man shaking his fist at a world that has passed him by.

I was pointing out that any perceived "lack of ethics," or whatever you want to call it, is a human thing, not an age thing.
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
I'm not sure why you quoted me. My post was in direct response to someone who said something like "young people have no ethics" as if that blanket, absurd statement has any real meaning beyond an old man shaking his fist at a world that has passed him by.

I was pointing out that any perceived "lack of ethics," or whatever you want to call it, is a human thing, not an age thing.

While I agree that it is more of a "human thing" rather than specific to any group, I will say as employing a wide range or staff of varying ages, races and economic backgrounds the younger workers (school aged to early twenties) seem to be the laziest and least principled of the bunch. Obviously that is only going off of my own experience but since I a basically keeping a constant in the kitchen with my expectations and treatment of employees evenly regardless of any of these items it is only logical to equate some of those negative issues with what they all have in common. I'm not saying that anyone over a certain age can never be a bad lazy employee and vice versa under a certain age, just that I never have to ask my older workers to get off their phone and go do something or reprimand them for cutting corners with something.
 
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Joined Apr 27, 2015
I agree with both you guys. I do think it's not necessarily an age thing, but age does have a factor in how empathetic people can be. Younger people are probably on average more self-absorbed, often bundles of raging hormones that are more reactive than proactive. So I guess it can go either way.

As far as walking off on a job, I think it depends on the context. It can be responsible or irresponsible IMO. If you're being abused, I see no reason to give 2 weeks notice you're willing to be more abused.
 
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Joined Dec 13, 2018
I think what often gets lost in the mix is that phone's are much more of a tool that can be used in the kitchen and other ways in life. The younger generation often gets labeled lazy for "playing on their phones" when they are actually working. Not to say that some of them aren't playing on their phones, just that people might be surprised how often that tool can be used for good. The pure size of my venue dictates that I need to be on my phone throughout my day to coordinate events on separate floors, caterings off site, corporate emails, multiple vendors, being in communication with our marketing team and maintenance crew, etc. There's not enough time in my day to do all these things and run the kitchen without my phone. Now, my venue is atypical and I wouldn't need my phone hardly ever at my previous position.
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Of course! But mngmt and sales are different from production, which is what most cooks are.

Not saying that “devices” aren’t useful in the kitchen, for looking up recipies, videos or pics of techniques or processes, or calculating.

My issue is one of addiction, because I seem to recognize that many younger employees can’t go 20 minutes without checking up on social media, and this has nothing to do with work. Once again I stress that what you do on your break time is your business, but if you have to check on social media every 20 mins, or have “alerts” every ten mins, while doing production work you have an addiction problem.
 
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