Walking off a job with no notice .... your thoughts?

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Have you ever done it?

Would you admit to having done this if asked in an interview (or lie about it and say you've never done it)?

Do you think it was ok to leave without giving/working a 2 week notice or were you trying to hurt the restaurant/boss/co-workers? (I'm not talking about you give 2 weeks and they tell you to leave immediately.)

Would you do it again?

Have you ever ghosted an interview or stage?

What is it about food service that makes this kind of behavior acceptable?
 
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
Boy, that brings back memories. I did that on one of my first jobs as dishwasher at a university. Chef was an old school, overbearing, grumpy, angry old man. Lasted for some months under his obnoxious, pointless rude behavior before finally quitting. When I informed the F&B Director he just gave me a wry smile and said, "I don't blame you".
Would I admit it in an interview? Absolutely. He was an a...ole and a thief and had I been older I probably would have punched him in the nose instead of just quitting.
It isn't specific to food service. It happens in every profession.
 
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If you work at a job that doesn't work out you should leave under good conditions. I've always done my part and have always left the restaurant better for me being there.

Knowing what I know now, I would lie through my butt to get everything I want. I also realize I would have to back up anything I said in order to get the position. In my case it was a matter of not having proof I could do something. It was just that I knew I could do it if given the chance.

Most of the lies are on the business side. Most owners have short memories about what was promised in an interview. I guess they figure they have you so why bother filling through.

As for giving proper notice. I don't let a businesses lack of integrity make me jeopardize mine.
 
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Nothing says that you have to "give notice". If you are employed in an "at will" state your boss can walk over to you and say you're fired without any explanation. Likewise you can leave at any time also.

So giving notice is something of a courtesy accorded to an employer who you feel deserves it, to give them time so they can perhaps hire a replacement. But if you feel like you can't take another minute of a toxic environment or you feel threatened, bullied or abused it's best just to not show up because if you agree to stay for another two weeks the situation will likely only escalate.
 
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Yup, did it about 4 mths ago.
I was working almost 2 years with the exec.
Chef of a 200 rm hotel, chronic alcoholic, hands shaking like a paint mixer every morning when he walked in. Started every sentence off with an excuse, and was never to be found during the day. Anyway, he like to call up his staff after work on their phones when he was sh*tfaced. First time I let it slide, second time I played my phone for the H.R., third time I by-passed the H.R. and went straight to the G.M.

Well folks, I guess you know by now that there was a 4th time, but I did give 8 hrs notice, cleared out my locker the same day.

Does this count, jcakes?


Chef billyb, I have to disagree about mostly only employers/owners lying. Reading through applicant’s resumes I can pinpoint B.S. regarding length of stay, position, and salary. Watching new hires holding a tip on the outside of a piping bag and making a mess while claiming they worked as Cake decorators uh...”induced” me to call their bluff.

‘Course many owners lie through their teeth about salary and “after the probation period”, no denying that. But just as many employees lie outright about the things I mentioned in the above paragraph. And statistically, there are many more employees than employers.
 
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I have walked off of a job in the middle of my shift. Why? They were late with everyone's paycheck and screwed me on my overtime. They suspended the chef and I was the one she left in charge. Was working 14-16 hour days, got no recognition from the owners for it. Wasn't worth my mental energy nor time.
I have no showed on a stage because I was no longer interested in the position. I have also had it happen to me when I was a hiring manager. It is annoying but doesn't matter in the long run.
In my opinion it happens more in restaurants that are only out for the profit, treat their employees like crap and pay shit wages. Toxic environments aren't worth the money.
When I do give my 2 weeks notice the employer cuts my hours and I have had my pay illegally cut. Then I had to threaten with lawsuits because I know my rights.
 
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Have you ever done it? No, I can put up anybody for two weeks, I have to put with myself for the rest of my life.

Would you admit to having done this if asked in an interview (or lie about it and say you've never done it)? Yes, I have to live with myself for the rest of my life.

Have you ever ghosted an interview or stage? No, I have been ghosted, didn't like it, so won't do that to anybody else.

What is it about food service that makes this kind of behavior acceptable? It's not food service, it's people.
 
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...
When I do give my 2 weeks notice the employer cuts my hours and I have had my pay illegally cut. Then I had to threaten with lawsuits because I know my rights.

I don’t understand this. You want to quit, fine. If the employer cuts your hours, you work less at a place you don’t want to work at in the first place, I’d consider that a bonus. If you don’t work, you don’t get paid, and there’s no contract that said you will earn X $ per pay period.
 
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I don’t understand this. You want to quit, fine. If the employer cuts your hours, you work less at a place you don’t want to work at in the first place, I’d consider that a bonus. If you don’t work, you don’t get paid, and there’s no contract that said you will earn X $ per pay period.

I do see your point. My mentality is a little different and that is fine. As a worker, I depend on my hours and pay. When I have given my 2 weeks the hours and pay I rely on are no longer there. I work FT so a 2 week transition can really fk with one's finances. I have come to learn to find a new job, quit the old and move on. It is what works best for me and my life. Cooks are always around to fill spots where I live so it is not too big of an issue for the owners. At the same time I've also been in management positions where people do not give a 2 weeks, and I am working twice as many hours now, exhausted, etc. I understand both sides of the equation.
 
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I have quit without notice for only one job. I was being worked to death and being expected to produce for a catering company under ridiculous circumstances and found out that the owner was intentionally screwing my pay. After I found out I was basically not going to be compensated for all my extra time there was really no logical reason to stay and work two weeks just to not be paid for it. (Although I did come back for two days unpaid to finish a wedding catering because in the end it was not the staff or the clients fault for such a shitty employer.)

My work history is usually measured in long spans of time at a business so no one ever really asks me about leaving jobs.

I always go to interviews or stages even if I have already found something because the experience is good and you never know if something will come out of it.

I don't think it is limited to food service as I have seen people in other professions struggle with this. I think it may have more to do with pay and education levels rather than industry.
 
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Great topic! I have thoughts so it's good thing I'm on a message board : )

Have you ever done it? No, but I'm not above it either. I live in a "at will" state where giving notice is a courtesy not a requirement. Companies can cut me with out even blinking an eye (its happened) but companies don't get another job in my profession, people do, so I don't burn bridges.

I have been in some toxic and poor work environments but have always stuck it out. With that said, I've never been in a really bad situation either, crappy yes, but so bad as to have to have it out of my life ASAP.


Would you admit to having done this if asked in an interview (or lie about it and say you've never done it)? I don't have any of those crappy companies on my resume. Where there is a gap I've just put in my resume that "I took time off for an educational opportunity" and leave it at that. The two times it has happened to me I found out with in the first month and quit before it became to much to bear..

Do you think it was ok to leave without giving/working a 2 week notice or were you trying to hurt the restaurant/boss/co-workers? (I'm not talking about you give 2 weeks and they tell you to leave immediately.) The only reason I give or not give a two week notice is based on how it will benefit or hurt me. Making decisions with hurting someone is dysfunctional thinking and puts me out of balance with the universe

Would you do it again? In regards to the two times in my life I've had to make the decision, yes, I would do it again.

Have you ever ghosted an interview or stage? No, this is immature behavior..

What is it about food service that makes this kind of behavior acceptable? This happens in every industry, not just food service. In my humble opinion it's more prevalent in the food service industry because of the low bar to getting into the field. There are a lot of people who kick around food service that have a hard time working out their issues in a positive and healthy manner.. In my experience..
 
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this whole thread falls back on money and the lack of a certification requirement to enter this industry. It is the biggest industry in the world. There major money behind this industry to brainwash entry level employees. It's ok to work 80 hours a week because you have the passion. Passion and hourly abuse can't be in the same sentence.
As far as giving notice when leaving employment. It's call ethics. Course here in the states younger people lack any ethics. I give them a pass. Look at the numbers. The countries high school graduates that go on to further education has dropped 41%.in the last 10 yrs.
You do the math.
Walking out from an egregious event is absolutely proper. But it's also your duty to make formal reports so it doesnt happen to those that follow.
never "live to work, work to live" thats life. work to receive compensation as to enjoy your time away from work.
 
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As far as giving notice when leaving employment. It's call ethics. Course here in the states younger people lack any ethics. I give them a pass. Look at the numbers. The countries high school graduates that go on to further education has dropped 41%.in the last 10 yrs.
You do the math.

I'm confused as to what your point is here. And to paint "younger" people with such a broad brush is bad form, IMO. What do ethics and lack of further education have to do with each other?

The reduction in post high school education pursuit has to do with eroding opportunities for young people (i.e. less likely to see a ROI from a college degree, especially a masters) as well as the abhorrent cost of further education in the US. Doesn't make sense to commit to $50-100k in debt for a job that pays $15 an hour. It doesn't have anything to do with "ethics" or whatever nonsense.

If you want to tout ethics you should go after the companies that export jobs, stagnate wages, treat employees like disposable cattle, eliminated unions, eliminated healthcare, retirement savings, pensions, etc.

Companies won't take care of their employees yet you are quick to disparage "young" people for lack of ethics? Where do the ethics of businesses come into play? If companies want loyalty out of an employee then they have to be willing to invest in the things that keep employees loyal. But treating workers like garbage and somehow not expecting a revolving door of new hires and disposable workers is myopic.
 
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I agree. Don't equate lack of ethics in the younger generation with disillusionment and disgust.
 
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someday, you are spot on.

I have zero loyalty to any company anymore, only to people. I've had employers get mad at me when I've put in my notice. Really? They never cared one bit about me, they were only upset because it's a lot of work and costs them money to hire and train a new person.

One employer yelled at me and told me I was ruining his Hawaiian vacation. He was also the same person that sat across the table a month prior and said he couldn't give me much of a raise (even though I was exceeding expectations, his words not mine) because the government makes him pay employee taxes. He then proceeded to show me how much I cost him to work for his business.

At another company, I got laid off and made to work out a stated period of time (training a worker that my job was being outsourced to) to collect a severance. After that, I stopped giving a two week notice unless my immediate boss was a just and fair person that I respected. Otherwise, F*** them.. Loyalty goes both ways..
 
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all wonderful responses. I don't disagree or agree. The name companies is a broad stroke to me.
I speak from the other side as an owner of 37 yrs. Simple fact is, there does not exist a skilled labor pool. I understand I may have knocked the younger culinarians but it was my point that they don't have the former opportunities to learn and receive mentoring. Those opportunities lie in the small business sector which is so volatile.
I get you your point. I'll sign off and not respond. Please note, I've had 17 interns that I consider my success over anything financial.
 
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BTW, I never post to argue or create confrontation. Been here for decades.
I apologize if I have offended anyone.
 
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No offense taken here panini, but if I may please?
What I take from your comment in that "ethics" meaning, respect for ones' self and this may be hard to come by these days with the younger generation.
Ethics, religion, personal integrity, all mold a person. It is taught, not natural.
 
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No offense taken here panini, but if I may please?
What I take from your comment in that "ethics" meaning, respect for ones' self and this may be hard to come by these days with the younger generation.
Ethics, religion, personal integrity, all mold a person. It is taught, not natural.

That is a crock of BS.

I honestly started typing a lengthy takedown of this absolutely dumb line of thinking and stopped myself and erased it all. Probably not worth it, and unlikely to change your mind anyways.

I'll just say, I love how old people are responsible for the degradation of our society (I'm not saying you're right, but you talk about "teaching ethics" in your post...if you think that is true then doesn't that mean your generation failed to teach the next one ethics properly?) and then get mad when society starts to suck.

I've known just as many, if not more, morally corrupt, lazy, entitled old people than I have people of my age or younger. You live in a bubble...time to pop it.
 
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Your right you won't change my mind. Let me ask you where you personal responsibility and ethics evolved from?
 
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