Walk in the forest, I found some nice Porcini mushrooms!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by french fries, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. french fries

    french fries

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    Here's what I found today! And how I prepped them.

    cepe1.JPG cepe2.JPG cepe3.JPG cepe4.JPG prep1.JPG prep2.JPG prep3.JPG prep4.JPG prep5.JPG
     
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    bread1.jpg bread2.JPG bread4.JPG
     
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  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    WooHoo!
     
  4. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    Nice, I am too afraid of mistaking a poisonous one so I don't ever get to forage.
     
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  5. french fries

    french fries

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    I hear you. I started foraging for porcini mushrooms only 2 years ago, with a friend/chef who explained how to recognize them. There are a few things you can do to recognize them. For example they shouldn't have any ribs under the cap: if they do, they're not the kind of porcini you should be eating. Instead they have either nothing at all (young ones) or some kind of foam that can be beige or light brown (kinda old) to greenish (even older). You can eat them all, from young to older. The young ones are firmer and hold their shape better: great for texture, presentation, for breading etc... the older ones are spongier and loser, the caps come apart from the foot easily, but they have more taste. It depends on the use. I like the younger ones because they're less likely to have worms or be partially eaten by slugs (sorry, not very appetizing, but that's the whole truth about mushrooms I'm afraid). But when you find an older one with a beige foam that's in great shape, no holes etc... then you hit the jackpot.

    If you find young ones that are small and you can't check under the cap because it's tight against the foot, then if the cap is shiny and slightly sticky then don't eat it. When in doubt don't eat it or bring it to someone who can identify it for you. Here in France it's common practice to bring your mushrooms to the local pharmacy so they can double-check them for you. They usually know local mushrooms very well.

    But after only one session foraging with my friend and asking a few questions, I feel confident that I can forage on my own and feed my wife and kids without any fear.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    @french fries what a treat! Fried mushrooms is such a favorite of mine. Did you make a sauce? Or a squeeze of lemon?
     
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  7. butzy

    butzy

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    Great!
    Thanks for the pictures.
    I know these mushroons as "eekhoorntjesbrood" (squirrel bread).
    Never knew their English name ;)
    We used to collect them as kids in autumn. Always loved them!
     
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  8. french fries

    french fries

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    No, nothing like that, although now that you mention it, it could have been a nice addition! I found some more yesterday, and even more today. Yesterday I simply diced the mushrooms and sautéed them in butter with pancetta and garlic, I think I might do the same tonight.

    I also found pounds and pounds of wild raspberry, they're sooo tasty, a far cry from what you can purchase in stores. I had so much I made jam! Also found some blackberries, blueberries and juniper berries that I'm going to use in a sauerkraut I've planned for the week end.
     
  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Bolitus mushrooms, those with tubes under the cap instead of gills, are benign for the most part. There is only one species that is significantly poisonous, and they are relatively small with bulbous cap, usually with a bright red/orange/yellow colored cap. Those that are slimy on top or that turn blue when damaged are mildly poisonous, mostly causing stomach upset.

    I have to say though that the small porcini with its bulbous cap did make me think of the poisonous species...
     
  10. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    And that's why I just pick mine up from the grocery store. I know they aren't as good and way over priced but how embarrassing would it be to be killed by eating the wrong mushroom.
     
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Lucky dog
     
  12. french fries

    french fries

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    More!!!

    Beautiful:
    Cepe.JPG

    Not this one!!
    Amanite.JPG

    This one is too old/big for my taste:
    Big.JPG

    Nice:
    Nice.JPG

    To be fried in duck fat with some garlic:
    champis.JPG
     
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  13. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    I've never seen a mushroom like that red one it looks like it's straight out of a cartoon.
     
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  14. fatcook

    fatcook

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    I am terribly jealous of the berries!