wages

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by littleone, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. littleone

    littleone

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    Hi, to anyone out there. i'm looking for some ifo on wages. if you could give me some feedback on what the current hourly rate for freelancing, as a pastry chef, say with 5 years post appreniceship experience, would be, I would be very grateful. Thanks, littleone :)
     
  2. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Freelancing for whom? doing what? Where?
     
  3. littleone

    littleone

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    Working for a local area restaurant in Victoria, BC. Doing specialty desserts and brunch pastries. Maybe looking at 12 hours a week. What do you think?
     
  4. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Are these your designs and recipes? Do they charge a lot for the desserts? If so, you can charge a premium for your work. If they know your work, and like it, they shouldn't have a problem with that. They do need to make a profit, so make sure you don't price your work too high.

    I don't know the Canadian pay scale at all, but in the area where I live (suburban NY), freelancing will usually range between $20 and $30 an hour for caterers and restaurants.
     
  5. littleone

    littleone

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    Thanks! Yes they are my dessert designs and recipes. The restaurant sought me out, so I'm guessing that they know what I do, and that they like it. The only problem with this area is that people are so tight lipped about what kind of wage they are earning, that it is hard to get a feel as to what would be an appropriate amount to go with, you know? But thatnkyou so much for the info so far, if you have anymore, that would be great too! have a good day, littleone
     
  6. panini

    panini

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    hiya
    Around here I have advised people to go for a flat fee contigient upon the first four weeks. I have a friend who does approx. 10-12 hrs. and gets a flat 250. week. some weeks a little more time, some times a little less. Its usually hard to justify hours to a chef who does not see everything you do. The hourly thing doesn't work well for this. Plus someone always expects you to be there certain times. This cuts down on creativity. My friend has 2 yrs experience and does prep at different time adjusting to her new daughters schedule.
    FYI this did not come easy. I would advise going in with preping desserts, with the line to finish. If they get slammed, it's a matter of grabbing more prep, and not the phone. Good luck.
     
  7. littleone

    littleone

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    thanks, that helps alot! wish i could type more but my 6 month old is jumping on my lap :)
     
  8. littleone

    littleone

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    Thanks for all the help everyone. Keep them coming, it has been great info so far. I've just got to say I'm loving this site :D I'm new to it, and it just rocks.
     
  9. 100folds

    100folds

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    I work in Vancouver but in Edmonton I owned a catering company and I priced my work out by the quantity. That way I was able to gage the amount that it would cost me to make the item and how much time each item would take me approx.

    Take the cost of the food+ the amount of time that it would take you, give yourself a wage and add on how much profit you would like to take home. Look at the end price and if it seems unreasonable than try to find ways to cut the food cost, not your wage or profit. But do not sacrifice quality, especially if they sought you out.

    Good luck