W. De Bord

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by blueribboncakes, Oct 22, 2001.

  1. blueribboncakes

    blueribboncakes

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    Hey there! Here's the link to their new site
    http://home.earthlink.net/~mailboxnewsmag/

    Hope it helps. I love that magazine. Wow, how cool that you are a pastry chef. I wish I could have done that! But, 3 kids later and 12 years into marriage, we are settled in as missionaries. My husband works for New Tribes Mission, as their illustrator. Yep, that's the same mission that had 3 men taken hostage almost 9 years ago and have been presumed dead. Now we have 2 more in the Philippines. We lived in Thailand for 4 years before, and with my love for cooking, I learned how to make authentic thai food.
    There is a competition in February for cake decorators in Florida through the Central Florida fair.
    Well, you are lucky to have all of those magazines from your mom. You could get a pretty penny for them on ebay!
    :bounce:
     
  2. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Thanks for the link, I'll have to look around later on. My Mother still has all of her magazines. I have to go to her house to peek thru them, there's too many and it really takes along time to look up something. I've found them to be a great source for Easter and Christenings ideas. It's kind of hard looking up somethings because their photos for the holiday are rarely in the month of the holiday issue. But that's o.k., that's when you find something really interesting on another theme.


    I'm a chip off the old blocks (both my parents are avid readers). They had us write down which of their posessions each child wanted from their estate when they pass. My sisters want the dishes and the jewlery...I want Moms books! The ones with notes will be my favorites.

    Sounds like you lead a interesting life following your mission. Have you lived in other countries too? If so, how has it affected your baking?
     
  3. blueribboncakes

    blueribboncakes

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    I have found that I am more interested in trying to make asian sweets. They are very different though. They are tasty in their own right. I like to experiment with other ways of making sweets. Thai cooks tend to use steam more than the oven. In fact, in our village there were only two ovens! Mine and my friend's who also was American.
     
  4. w.debord

    w.debord

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    I only tried classic Chinese pastries once. I bought several different looking items like moon pies (I think they were called) to experiment one day when I was in China Town. Whehie, I took one bite from each and everyone had the same taste, bean paste??, I really didn't like them at all.

    Although I do really enjoy the fruit dumpling w/ carmel and sesame seeds you can get in many restaurants. I've made them at home too.

    But I'm not versed in Thia cuisine at all. I can't get my spouse interested in sampling with me. He's got a rather simple minded mid-western palate and so do my girl friends. It's just not happening in my area.

    What kind of desserts do they make that are steamed?
     
  5. blueribboncakes

    blueribboncakes

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    Thai sweets can vary. There is the traditional Sweet sticky rice (laced in a creamy rich coconut sauce), and mango. The Thai enjoy steamed custards, again with a coconut base. They use pandan leaf (which is green and has a mellow flavor) and jasmine liberally. They also incorporate the importance of craftsmanship in their foods, by creating fruit carvings that are simply to beautiful to eat. If you've ever eaten a steamed bun with barbequed pork in it, then you would have some idea, as to what type of texture is involved in Thai sweets. They tend to be less sweet than American foods. Many friends of mine have commented on how beautiful the asian sweets were, but how awful they tasted. It's all a matter of what you were conditioned to believe is delicious. In the village where we lived and worked, toasted grubs were considered the cat's pajamas!:confused:
     
  6. isa

    isa

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    I love, the look, of the Japanese sweets made in the woodden mould. They have lovely shapes and the imprint pattern, most often flowers or leaves, are georgous. I'm not crazy about the taste though, it's bean paste.