victorinox Serrated with rounded end

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by nzw102, May 31, 2015.

  1. nzw102

    nzw102

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    Does anybody have experience using this knife. In the kitchen I work in it seems to have saved thousands of dollars in knives due to the fact it's so multipurpose. My chef gave me my first one about a year ago and it has replaced all my shuns (probably 600$ in knives) and it's only limitation is cutting herbs. The knife itself cost 25$ but I've gotten. straighter cuts and the most beutiful dices using this knife than any chefs knife I ever used. The rounded end gives you the rocking motion of a chefs knife and the serrated edges cut through anything with precision.

    I guess I'm just asking has this caught on in other kitchens? If not I really recommend this knife.
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Are you talking about a bread knife?
     
  3. tombola84

    tombola84

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    I think it's a victorinox pastry knife you are referring to
     
  4. panini

    panini

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    [​IMG]

    This bread knife?  I'm curious how you achieve a rocking motion as a french with that handle. Don't your knuckles hit the board?
     
  5. nzw102

    nzw102

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    Yes that's the knife. There are no issues with knuckles hitting the board because the handle is raised up, it has a real similar feel that a chefs knife does when cutting. I've worked in 2 private clubs and these knifes seem to be everybody's favorite knife.
     
  6. rick alan

    rick alan

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    This doesn't answer your question, and this is not a direct reference to your preference for bread knives so no need to take offense on that account, but you just gave most of us here a huge chuckle.

    The knife in Panini's picture does not have a raised/offset handle, nor would its rounded end contribute to a rocking motion, so this is confusing.

    A bread knife wouldn't do it for me but if it suites you so well I would suggest you try a Tojiro or better still MAC version for an additional eye opener of what a bread knife can be.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2015
  7. nzw102

    nzw102

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    I'll snap a picture of it tomorrow when I go into work, I'm not sure that is the exact model because they put out so many different serrated knives. I was just wondering if it was common in kitchens it just seems more practical than any knife I have used.
     
  8. nzw102

    nzw102

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    more of the raised handle and the round half circle at the end there allows you to rock it. I'm not sure was just getting others thoughts on it I love it, I'll also look into those knives posted above thank you for the recommendation.
     
  9. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I have one of these, I cut sandwiches and bread with it, would never replace my other knives. Yes you can dice an onion with it, or slice cheese or cut veggies, but that's not what it;s made for. Learn to use your knives, learn to keep them sharp, you only need to have a few.


    Or get one of these

     
  10. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Like Buba says about sharp.  Shuns are thick behind the edge for Japanese knives, comparable to most Germans in that respect, and they also have a lot of belly and that may be cramping your style.  And of course even the most expensive of dull knives are still just dull knives.  Any properly profiled, thinned and sharpened knife is going to cut most everything better than even the best serrated blades.

    I mean look at the videos here and tell me you serrated would compete.  http://www.cheftalk.com/t/79723/think-you-chop-an-onion-fast/30

    Rick
     
  11. panini

    panini

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    I have always used this type of knife for fruits, pineapple, melons, etc. I did just look in my roll. There must have been a design change or different handle. No room for knuckles.

    I have had some of my knives for 30 - 45yrs. It's a RHForschner- 9 inch blade.
     
  12. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    perfect dice maybe, but by tomorrow that perfect dice cut (shredded really) with a serrated edge will be a watery translucent mess in the bottom of your 1/9, barely good for composting much less serving to guests!
     
    millionsknives and rick alan like this.