Victorinox Fibrox Pro 8 Inch Chefs Knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by kitchenalpha, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. kitchenalpha

    kitchenalpha

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    I'm thinking of making a new knife purchase. I'm in the market for a new chefs knife and I am interested in the Victorinox Fibrox Pro 8-Inch Chefs knife. It has great reviews on Amazon but I wanted to see if anyone owns one and what you think of it?
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I used one for 4 years before I moved on to better.  Stamped blade reasonably thin.   Handle is bulky and cramps my hand after 10 minutes.  The handle angles into the blade making it annoying to sharpen.  Steel is uninspiring but at least it is very stain resistant.  

    If you don't want to bother maintaining your knives and value abuse taking over cutting performance, this is the knife for you.  I got one for my mother who has no respect for tools.

     It's okay for $35.  If you had another $25 you can get a Tojiro DP
     
  3. foody518

    foody518

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    Highly buffed V edge with a slight convex due to the buffering?
     
  4. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Yeah I've done some minor thinning maybe 30 minutes to knock off the shoulders.  Can't go too far with this steel or the edge will fail faster.   It's not hard enough to withstand laser thin geometries.
     
  5. foody518

    foody518

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    It could certainly use some thinning as Millions describes to better taper from the blade face overall into the buffed edge. 

    Bernard, it just so happens that I got to sharpen around half a dozen almost new Victorinox fibrox knives in a setting similar to yours :) the angle of the factory edges I saw were actually not too high, very possibly 15-20 degrees at the edge. Pretty shiny in that slightly convexed way too, a little like how Misono factory edges look.
     
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  6. jimyra

    jimyra

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    I have been using a Forschner by Victorinox for thirty five years.  It is a 10" with rosewood handle. I also have an assortment of Forschner and Victorinox knifes with fibrox handles about 10-15.  I would highly recommend Victorinox knifes.  Victorinox makes a diamond finishing hone that works very well.  If you are new to knifes this is a good choice.  Learn to sharpen it and practice your knife skills.  Some of the comments on this site are from real knife aficionados.  If they were talking cars they would be talking about taking .00000001" off a brake disk to stop faster.  That is not to say they are wrong, just a little too detailed.  Good luck with your purchase.    
     
  7. foody518

    foody518

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    @Jimyra  The comments about minor thinning, easing the shoulders are not 0.00000001 marginal improvement type comments. I see the performance increases from doing that minor work as yielding results your typical not knife-savvy user will notice makes their cutting tasks easier
     
  8. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    IMO after thinning it can cut 30-50% better.  It's really noticeable when you don't wedge your food.  Onions stay together when you're cutting, dense vegetables like carrots and sweet potatoes don't wedge and crack.  Allowing for faster, safer, more efficient work.  if you have the sharpening stones anyway this costs you a few minutes time and is worth scratching up your knife to do.
     
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  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    My 10" Vic Rosewood came in a .014-.015 at the edge all around, that's not bad, considering you would never want to take these knives lower than .010"/2.5mm.

    I did grind in a considerable amount of distill taper at the tip, but for a $45 (shipped) knife not bad up there either.

    The plastic handle are a fairly recent redesign I think, thinner near the heal.  The Rosewood is abominably thick there, forces your thumb and everything else way forward, but that is easy enough to fix with a Dremel and 5/8" sanding drum attachment.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  10. rick alan

    rick alan

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     Yes, but of course you notice a big difference going from the stock .35mm down to .25.

    Anyway KitchenAlpha, the point is that the Vic is well worth it's modest price, and if you ever get ambitious you can make it even better.

    None of us would ever use a diamond steel as Jimra recommended, but if you are new to sharpening it may prove an easy way to get your feet wet, though don't stick with it too long as it creates a rather rough edge and will remove a metal too quickly from your edge, and before you know it your nice thin edge will become a fatty.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  11. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Why not?  I would use a higher grit diamond or ceramic rod on victorinox or wusthof sure (light pressure of course).  This type of soft steel is meant to be honed.  Won't chip, will probably help
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  12. jimyra

    jimyra

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    I did not say diamond steel. I said diamond finishing hone.  I am not quite new to sharpening I had my first lesson around 1955.  This tool is actually made for ceramic knifes but works quite well on steel.  First you knife has to be sharp then a quick finish with this hone before your shift works. https://www.smkw.com/victorinox-ceramic-knife-sharpener  I use it on my thirty five year old Forschner knifes.
     
  13. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    @Jimyra   can you tell us about usage of that?  do you hold the knife still and then move the hone?  I've only seen one other thing like this here

     
  14. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I believe Jimra speaks of this:



    Way too small, though I did make use of a similar sized diamond plate for several years, but a did all my cutting in-hand essentially, and never had to remove serious amounts of metal as you do with a knife that sees lots of board work.  I'd have had fits if it were sharpening the latter.  Not at all the ideal setup for a newbie, or anyone else.  For that money you can get a full-sized/nearly-full-sized combination waterstone.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2016
  15. jimyra

    jimyra

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    MillionsKnives

         The stand holds the knife and you move the hone parallel to your table.  It keeps the blade very sharp.

    Rick Alan,
    That is the hone/sharpener I use.  It is large enough for my 10" chef.  If you are removing serious amounts of metal you are using the wrong board or abusing your tools.  As far as a lot of board work I have done a little.  Have you ever spent 12-16 hours a day six days a week prepping, that is a lot of board work.  This is used after you use a combination stone.  I have not had my knife on a stone in months. And IMO it is ideal for a novice, home cook, of in a professional kitchen.  If you stick to moderately priced knifes and use them properly you have money to spend on this item. 
     
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  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Yes I'll buy that, so long as the OP keeps up with it then it's not really so bad at all.

    For you on the other hand, I'd say you'd possibly be well served moving up to an 6 or 8" DMT diamond plate mounted to a wood paddle, as I just spoke of in another post.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2016