Vegetable Knife?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by FNCrazy, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. aliphares

    aliphares

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    I honestly think anything beyond tojiro/fujiawara or a sabatier or even zwilling/wusthof is more about the knife enthusiast getting a new toy than any functional reasons. Do they cut better? Hell yes. But you don't really "need" that extra cutting power, especially for the added price.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
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  2. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Depends on the want, doesn't it?
     
  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I was doing catering quanties of prep with an $8 chinese cleaver yesterday.

    There are good and bad knives in every price range.
     
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  4. iceman

    iceman

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    My point was simple. ... Somewhat like ... "When a person asks you what time it is ... TELL HIM. ... Don't build him a watch.".

    The OP asked about "VEGETABLE KNIVES". The OP did not ask for anyone to talk him out of a nakiri, or to suggest a gyuto.
     
  5. benuser

    benuser

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    Just wondering what's wrong with suggesting a gyuto when someone has to deal with a lot of vegetables. A nakiri is only one of the options.
     
  6. iceman

    iceman

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    He asked about VEGETABLE KNIVES.

    Just like you do regularly ... you don't answer questions directly. You answer them as the all-knowing sensei that has to guide everyone to the way YOU think. Your first paragraph (4 sentences) only suggested that the OP really didn't want or need a VEGETABLE KNIFE but should get a gyuto. You only made negative statements about nakiris ... because it's what you think is correct. Opinions are just fine. You just never seen to let anyone have one ... except yours.

    I'll say this again because maybe you didn't read it last time ...
    "The OP asked about "VEGETABLE KNIVES". The OP did not ask for anyone to talk him out of a nakiri, or to suggest a gyuto."
     
  7. benuser

    benuser

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    Dear Iceman, I don't think I owe you an explanation for the way I answered the OP's question. I do it in my way, others in theirs. But I think you will feel much better if you add me to your ignore-list.
     
  8. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Well so I have heard other respectable chefs respond as Iceman has here, so I have to assume it is an important part of their serious habitual mind sets, intrinsic to the the thinking of a chef. Fortunately for most of the rest of us here this part of our thinking need not be so rigid, and we will most likely remain relaxed in following our proclivities concerning knives and their perceived attributes.

    There are a tiny number of real schmucks to be found on any knife forum, those so full of dimwitted BS (and absolutely nothing else) you sometimes even see it clearly spelled out in their names. This is a real misfortune for everybody else.

    But this is certainly not the Iceman and I am all in favor of letting him express his proclivities in a manner that is, as described above, equally free of stressful adherence to predominant thought trends here. I simply wouldn't want it any other way.

    And Benuser my esteemed friend here, you most certainly can ignore anyone yourself, with absolutely nothing lost.

    Now goodness but I forgot what the hell this post is suppose to be about...
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
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  9. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Hilarious Rich.
     
  10. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    P.S. I’m one of those people Benuser mentioned earlier - have a nakiri but rarely use it. Looks cool but is my least favorite knife in 50 years of cooking
     
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  11. rick alan

    rick alan

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    A nikiri was actually the very first Japanese knife I ever saw. It was 40 years ago, and the the equally young recent college grad who owned it handle it with reverence as he showed it to me, pointing to an onion and saying how amazing what it could do with it. Carbon steel and no more than 7", thin spine and tapering to what seemed the thickness of a hair before it got very near to the edge. I still remember it vividly and how impressed I was.

    Such a nakiri would certainly get used, though perhaps a shun, wusty or even Tojiro one might soon become drawer queens. Then maybe not. In any event I'd still favor my Takamura gyuto over the nikiri. Works as well as the nikiri for everything except maybe Katsurumaki (making vegetable skin), and lots more versatile. No need to put it down and grab for another knife.

    Actually you can get around not having a tip for most everything, but do you really want the challenge?
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
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  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Getting back to FNCrazy, who should most likely be looking at a 240 gyuto, any idea what kind of steel you want? Laser or middleweight (little more toughness and forgivingness).
     
  13. benuser

    benuser

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    Middle-weight have a better food separation. With very thin blades, expect the food to stick to the blade's right face. Blades with more meat have a convexed - a bit rounded - right face on which slices won't adhere.
     
  14. benuser

    benuser

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    Next choice to be made is stainless or carbon steel. Stainless is more convenient as it requires a little bit less care in daily use, and better support some neglect. Carbons ask for some additional care when brand new, sharpen much easier and get a crazy sharpness that's very easy to maintain.