Vegetable Knife?

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Joined Jan 18, 2018
I'm sorry, I'm not well versed in the knife world. I did look around before asking, but I'm sure the answer lies somewhere.

I only have one knife that I feel isn't junk. I have no idea how it compares to anything. It's a Wusthof chef knife that I bought 10 years ago.

I have a couple questions. Recently I've moved in with someone that eats a ton of vegetables. I want to get a Japanese (I don't know why) knife for vegetable work, but I don't know what length is best? Also, for meat (no bones, just meat) I use my chef knife. Is there a different size or type better suited for meat?

Sorry so long, thanks for the help!
 
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Joined Jan 7, 2018
A Japanese vegetable knife, or nakiri, is usually around 165mm. They're great at what they do and many people swear by them. But ask yourself, do you really need one? The reason they might feel better at it than your wusthoff is the that the former is significantly thinner, being japanese. But then why not just buy a Japanese chef knife (gyuto) that can be used for so much more and using the wusthoff as the beater knife for things like gourds and such. A gyuto is usually 210 or 240, or even 270 mm. I suggest 240.
If you really want that nakiri though, go ahead and get one, they'll still be a significant upgrade.
As for meat slicing, a slicer (duh) would be the best way. Theyre super thin knives that will make cutting and portioning neat a lot easier. Either get a western one, I suggest a sabatier, orthe Japanese version, the sujihiki, which is thinner still. Models and specs depend on your budget.
 
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I am right handed, but I was in a crash and most things I do with my left now. I didn't know the Wusthof was heavy, so maybe a gyuto would be easier to use for me because of lighter weight? Another reason to get a Japanese knife.

I think I'm willing to spend up to $200 for a gyuto. Will that be enough for a quality knife?

I'm not even sure how to figure out which gyuto is better than another. Do people have any suggestions in that price range?

Thank you for your help!
 
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Nevermind, I just realized what I was asking. The gyuto is one of the most common chef knives. I should be able to figure out which ones are best.
 
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I asked because Japanese knives are rarely ambidextrous, and cause serious problems when used with the wrong hand. Expect steering and food sticking issues.
I'll definitely still use my right hand. I just can't figure out how to cut with my left. I didn't realize it, but maybe it's partly the knife in addition to my problems.

Also I've been looking. What is the difference between wa gyuto and the other gyuto I can't find now?

Also, as brands go, is a Takamura gyuto a good knife? Good value?
 
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Also've been looking. What is the difference between wa gyuto and the other gyuto I can't find now?

Also, as brands go, is a Takamura gyuto a good knife? Good value?

Wa and Yo define the handle of the knife. Was handles are the simple Japanese ones. The Japanese don't care as much about their handles and that's why they opt for these. They yo handles are full (or partly) tang european style handles with scales added to the knife, similar to European knives. Wa handles are lighter and for me feel more nimble. But yo handles are heavier and feel sturdier. There's no right or wrong here, just a matter of preference.

Also for 200 you can find a lot of amazing knives. 150 - 200 or so is the probably as good as you ever need to go

Takamuras are very well received and they're an excellent choice, but then again so are a dozen other knives. Make sure you get something that has a profile that works well with your cutting style and have characteristics you prefer (whether that's being stainless, ease of sharpening...)
 
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A basic weight comparison:

Wusthof chef, 8" -- 280g

Masamoto wa-gyuto 11" -- 190g

And the Masamoto is not a super-lightweight.
 
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Joined Jan 26, 2018
Thanks for all the tips everyone - very helpful! I'm in desperate need of new knives in my kitchen. The Masamoto wa-gyuto looks like a great option.
 
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The Masamoto KS wa-gyuto is genius, but it's expensive and carbon steel. I adore mine, but don't be surprised by either factor. My wife has a Masamoto VG10 gyuto, yo handled, and it's good but nothing to write home about.
 
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Here ... this is what you asked for ... a Nakiri (vegetable knife). I've got 2 of them. One of them was my experiment with a ceramic knife. Whereas it's not a bad knife ... I don't need any more ceramic knives. This one is stainless. You really can't hurt it. I sharpen mine with an electric sharpener ... OH MY GOODNESS!!! ... it works just fine. It's only $40 ... so if you abuse it to death ... it's only $40. My recommendation.

tojiro-mvs-nakiri-165mm-16.png.jpeg

https://www.chefknivestogo.com/tomvsna16.html
 
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The Tojiro DP is an often recommended Japanese introductory knife, along with the Fujiwara FKM or FKH and Masahiro VC, but you get what you pay for.
 
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"... but you get what you pay for.".

Yeah ... a real decent knife for regular home cooks that don't have to prove anything by over-spending on a tool. Tojiro's are probably the best "house knives" that I've ever used in a pro-kitchen. Food doesn't taste any better because of the $$$ you've spent on your tools. Skills trump everything else.
 
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I honestly think anything beyond tojiro/fujiawara or a sabatier or even zwilling/wusthof is more about the knife enthusiast getting a new toy than any functional reasons. Do they cut better? Hell yes. But you don't really "need" that extra cutting power, especially for the added price.
 
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My point was simple. ... Somewhat like ... "When a person asks you what time it is ... TELL HIM. ... Don't build him a watch.".

The OP asked about "VEGETABLE KNIVES". The OP did not ask for anyone to talk him out of a nakiri, or to suggest a gyuto.
 
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He asked about VEGETABLE KNIVES.

Just like you do regularly ... you don't answer questions directly. You answer them as the all-knowing sensei that has to guide everyone to the way YOU think. Your first paragraph (4 sentences) only suggested that the OP really didn't want or need a VEGETABLE KNIFE but should get a gyuto. You only made negative statements about nakiris ... because it's what you think is correct. Opinions are just fine. You just never seen to let anyone have one ... except yours.

I'll say this again because maybe you didn't read it last time ...
"The OP asked about "VEGETABLE KNIVES". The OP did not ask for anyone to talk him out of a nakiri, or to suggest a gyuto."
 
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Well so I have heard other respectable chefs respond as Iceman has here, so I have to assume it is an important part of their serious habitual mind sets, intrinsic to the the thinking of a chef. Fortunately for most of the rest of us here this part of our thinking need not be so rigid, and we will most likely remain relaxed in following our proclivities concerning knives and their perceived attributes.

There are a tiny number of real schmucks to be found on any knife forum, those so full of dimwitted BS (and absolutely nothing else) you sometimes even see it clearly spelled out in their names. This is a real misfortune for everybody else.

But this is certainly not the Iceman and I am all in favor of letting him express his proclivities in a manner that is, as described above, equally free of stressful adherence to predominant thought trends here. I simply wouldn't want it any other way.

And Benuser my esteemed friend here, you most certainly can ignore anyone yourself, with absolutely nothing lost.

Now goodness but I forgot what the hell this post is suppose to be about...
 
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