Using pan extenders with Devils Food Cake

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by zekeman, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. zekeman

    zekeman

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    Hi all -

    Long time reader, first time poster.

    As the subject implies, I'm trying to use pan extenders with my devils food cake recipe and having no joy. The batter is so fluid that it flows through the notches and up the sides and out. I've used the extenders with yellow butter cake with no issues, but stumped on this one.

    How best to configure the pans so that I can bake taller cakes?

    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Are the sides of the pans you are using a perfect 90 degree angle?

    mimi
     
  3. zekeman

    zekeman

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    No, they are generic sheet pans with slightly angled walls.
     
  4. chefpeon

    chefpeon

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    I've had that issue in the past when baking full sheet cakes, but I dealt with it by either just trimming the part that leaked out underneath off the cake after it's baked; or not using the extender to make a taller cake; rather, baking two shorter sheet cakes in 2 pans with no extenders, or using an actual half sheet CAKE pan to bake two taller cakes that would go together to create a full sheet cake. I've also used aluminum foil to put over the corners where the notches are, which helps with leakage around the corners. Also, the flatter the pans are, the better. The extenders fit more snugly at the bottom edge.
     
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  5. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Like chef peon said, flat sheet pans are crucial to getting extenders or even rings to not leak.

    That said, 99.9% of the sheet pans are not flat, especially after they age. What I do is cut a silicone paper liner to fit into the extender. Overlap two sheets of paper on the counter, lay the extender over the paper and leave yourself at least 3" of room on all four sides. Now cut out a notch in each corner and crease each edge up, and fold the corners. What you are making is basically a paper box that fits into the extender.
     
  6. panini

    panini

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    If you're just having problems with the notches, just flip them over. Or do as all the above have said.
     
  7. chefpeon

    chefpeon

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    I've found that that doesn't work. The pan corners are usually rounded, and the top of the extender is square with a metal fitting on top to reinforce the corner. When you flip the extender over, the square metal fitting doesn't go down into the pan at all. It's actually worse.
     
  8. jcakes

    jcakes

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    If you're using a metal extender, as @chefpeon says flipping it over won't work because the top has a flat edge around it to keep it in shape. If you're using a fiberglass extender, you could flip it so the notches are up, depending on what the rise is like for the cake you might go over the notch (if you have a 3" extender that's less likely to happen). I have the fiberglass ones, in full and half sheet sizes and I just run a knife around the inside edge of the extender after baking and flip it out onto cardboards. I like @foodpump's suggestion to make a parchment paper "box"
     
  9. panini

    panini

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    cartoon-handyman-hammer-nail-16132978.jpg
    All great solutions.

    @chefpeon, sometimes baking just isn't a smooth art. You may need to forcibly correct things. Will add pic.

    In our bakery, we separate out the sheet pans used for sheet cakes. That's all they are used for, so they stay quite flat. We also remove that riveted metal in the corners. We cut a bowl scraper to fit that small notch. Then rebuild the extenders with foil tape. We use a couple of layers for strength. Our pot person treats them like they are her children. They actually fold and take up less space. We use (sorry, brain fart) oh, it's a 3M product. It's a bit costly but strong for the corners. It has silver & acrylic in it and can take up to something like 300F. #8340? 4380?
     
  10. chefpeon

    chefpeon

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    Hey, here's a novel idea.......maybe the manufacturers could make better pan extenders......hey, yeah......
     
  11. panini

    panini

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    WHAT??!!!! We'd have to manufacture them in the US. Now we develop the glass, then ship it off to have it assembled, and then buy them back. For the life of me I can't figure out how we would get an inferior product that way.
    Wish it were a bigger market. My hobby is metal working. I could fabricate up a set in a couple of hours. I think the key to reduce breakage is by hinging them.
    May have to mock one up. In-bedded, leak-proof-, interior piano-style hinges that won't effect the cake. Grooves to insert a tension piece of metal to make 1/2 sheets. million dollar idea. Last a lifetime. probably sell you all a couple each. I'm thinking a fair market value for it to be profitable would be $4,100.00 a pair. Someone start a list. I'll get cracking on making jigs and hiring undocumented workers.:>)
     
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