Using Bitters for Cooking

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by rittenremedy, Jan 19, 2019.

  1. rittenremedy

    rittenremedy

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    Has anyone ever used bitters, the kind for making cocktails, in food?

    I thought about putting this in my experimentation thread, but I wanted to see if anyone had tried it before. It sounds like an interesting idea. I used to make a kick ass marinade before I had to go gluten free. It uses beer along with mustard, vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, and rosemary. Sounds weird, but it's so good. I'm wondering about replacing the beer with dash of bitters, a bit of molasses, and maybe a little more vinegar.
     
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  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Replace your soy with tamari if you're going gluten free
     
  3. ChefBryan

    ChefBryan

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    I use bitters in several different things, from my garlic butter, to different marinades for fish and chicken.
     
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  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Last edited: Jan 27, 2019
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  5. rittenremedy

    rittenremedy

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    Not sure unfortunately. I've been tested for celiac, but the test was inconclusive (apparently positive but not positive enough for a diagnosis?!). I'm still hoping it's just leaky gut, because soy sauce didn't bother me years ago, but now I am very sensitive.

    There are some really great gluten free beers out there. It's a true shame they're sidelined because I've had sorghum beers that were as fruity as cider and really a treat.
     
  6. kashibaoshi

    kashibaoshi

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    Hmm, I have never thought of this, but the taste seems really interesting.
     
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  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Never tried it myself but beer in a marinade is rather popular.

    @rittenremedy , cut back on those foods bad for LG and that may also ease the gluten sensitivity. But maybe best you avoid gluten so long as you're sensitive to it.
     
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  8. morning glory

    morning glory

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    I've used Angostura Bitters in puréed swede (rutabaga) which may sound odd but it works really well. There is also something I do with sweet potato, bitters, rosemary and chilli.

    This thread has made me think I should use it more often!
     
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  9. rittenremedy

    rittenremedy

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    Actually, the only thing I've had sustained success with is kombucha. Which is expensive and silly, to me. I've tried a strict LG diet, probiotics, bitters (they're a digestive aid, relevance!), enzymes, and various combinations of the above. It's probably a combination of avoiding gluten and maybe something to do with promoting a proper upper GI tract environment? Believe me, I'm eager for a sustainable solution. At least fermented tea is cheaper and more effective for me than fancy supplements. As soon as I get my own place again I want to try making it.

    Bitter rutabaga does sound werid! I'll have to try it. A noticeable amount or just a dash??
     
  10. morning glory

    morning glory

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    Just a dash - I do it by tasting as I go.
     
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  11. rick alan

    rick alan

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    After hearing about the rutabaga I decided to try an amber ale with parsnip, one reason being swede and parsnip I typically add nothing to, so figured what worked for one would work for the other. Well I don't know what I'd think of bitters in swede, but don't think I'll repeat the parsnip experiment, even though I'm sure I over did it with the ale.
     
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  12. morning glory

    morning glory

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    I reckon less is more when adding alcohol to veg - at what stage did you add ale to the parsnip?
     
  13. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Used it for the boiling liquid, 6oz for 1.5 pounds. It was too much, but hard for me to imagine the taste doing anything good for my parsnips personally. From that perspective, I've never added anything to swede except the little evo it's cooked in, and only rarely butter S+P for parsnip. These veggies just stand on their own so well, swede with its mild sweetness and flavor, and parsnip with its tingly characteristic and powerful sweetness. I do want to try beer for a chicken marinade/sauce.

    Had you similar feelings as mine about swede before, and how exactly did it affect it for you?
     
  14. morning glory

    morning glory

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    Trust me on the bitters (a few drops) with swede - the very slight bitter taste works well with the mild sweet flavour. But I think you may well be right about parsnips and beer. I'm always up for a new challenge though!
     
  15. rittenremedy

    rittenremedy

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    Parsnips are fickle I feel. They don't like to share butter's attention with any other ingredient. I would have thought like you did that the bitterness would help with what I think sometimes are overwhelmingly sweet parsnips. Maybe worth tinkering with.
     
  16. morning glory

    morning glory

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    I've been thinking that a beer glaze for roasted parsnips would probably work. I agree that parsnips are 'fickle'. Well put!

    Rutabaga/swede has an inherent bitter edge despite its sweetness. If you eat it raw you can really taste that. Angostura Bitters complements that taste if used in moderation IMHO.
     
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