Universal Veal Stock

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by LakeLargo, Aug 25, 2019.

  1. LakeLargo

    LakeLargo

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    Hey guys, first post, have been using the forum as a lurker for some time and before I get started with the post, thanks to all for the past insight provided, some great minds at work here.

    Anyway, I am fortunate enough to have a supplier local to me with excellent fresh veal bones at around $0.50/kg, they are essentially a waste product. I have been picking them up and making stock for my own use for a year or so now and its been a joy to have in the freezer. I got talking to the supplier recently (whose main product is veal cuts to restaurants) and asked if the restaurants would ever be interested in purchasing veal stock. He said yes its an untapped market but he doesn't have the time or staff to produce it. Anyway, long story short, I do, and have a 100L and 250L stock pot fit for purpose. My biggest concern when tackling this one is that although we all know and love a veal stock, everyone seems to have a personal preference on technique and finishing. I want to product something that has an appeal to all cuisines, ie a neutral base without any aromatics leaning towards Italian, French, Spanish so that any prospective buyer could buy the stock and add their own flavour to it.

    This is my process so far and I would really appreciate any insight from those more experienced....

    100kg Veal bones, 50% roasted, 50% blanched
    Add reverse osmosis purified water to cover by 2 inches
    Simmer for eight-ten hours, skim regularly
    Add onions, carrots, bay, garlic, tomato paste, black pepper for one hour
    Drain, strain through muslin, measure into 1kg vacuum bags, chill in ice, vacuum seal.

    I guess my questions are

    Celery? in or out?
    Tomato paste, is it required?
    Vegetables, if I follow the ratios for home cooked stocks I am using huge amounts of veg, but i have found that for 100kg of bone mass 5-6kg of veg proportionally seems to give enough flavour?

    Any other insight hugely appreciated

    Cheers
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    It’s a loaded question, kinda like asking 10 different people “what’s the perfect vehicle for you to drive?”

    Many places can’t get/find veal bones, so they use/augment their stock with beef or pork bones, turkey or chic wings/feet, pigs trotters or the like. What most places are after is a high gelatin content, and a decent roasted flavour.

    So if you have access to veal bones, go for it! Make your stock scream “a really good veal Demi, ready for you to convert to your desire”.

    I.m.h.o. You can never have too much onions. Of course, they need to be roasted, as does the carrots and celery. What I like to do s roast the bones until pale yellow, then throw the whole mess on the flat top. Allow all the fat to drip off, then pick up each bone with tongs and throw back into the roasting pans with mirepoix. Tomato paste NEEDS to be roasted, adding it raw to a liquid stock will result in a very disappointing flavour.

    The mirepoix and Tom. paste are not there only for flavour—they add bulk to the stock as well. If you can’t get veal knuckle bones, then you need to boost the gelatin content with veal feet, turkey wings, or chicken feet. Pork is much cheaper, but if you use it, you GOTTA declare it.

    Basically a good veal stock is a pain in the *ss to make, many places won’t or can’t do it, since it ties up large steam kettle for days at a time. Make a good product and charge what you want for it— a good customer will pay, and a cheap customer will be happy to open a 1 gallon plastic pail of brown salty powder and won’t pay for a premium product.
     
  3. LakeLargo

    LakeLargo

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    Thanks for the quick reply foodpump. Fortunately the bones are mostly knuckles and ribs, haven't really had the need to add feet as I thought I would. The gelatin content after 8 hours simmering is really high, it sets very firm at that point. When I have been making the stock in smaller quantities for my own consumption I have always made a remouillage and then mixed both stocks before reducing again but for the larger volumes it involves a lot more ice for the cooling and obviously more gas for the second cooking, is it acceptable to cook the first stock for a few hours longer and only cool it once before packaging?

    I am also finding it takes forever to strain through muslin, it gets blocked up with particulate quite quickly and I have to change the fabric quite often, is there a more efficient way of filtering the stock short of using egg whites?

    Thanks again
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    What many do is use the remy (remouillsge) to start off a fresh batch of bones instead of plain water. I personally feel it’s a crime to throw out those bones only after 8-12 hrs simmering. This way you can avoid the reducing of stock+remy, utilize the kettle for stock during the day, and let the kettle go all night unsupervised with a remy.

    Instead of raiding the ice machine, try using Icewands or that old time honoured elcheapo standby, milk jugs filled with water and frozen. Toss one in the stock and another couple in the bath, and you’ll be cold in no time. You can always “ milk” the ice machine and store cubes in the freezer, but the milk jugs/icewands are pretty darn effective.

    When I strain I like to put a coarse chinoise into a fine mesh chinoise, then pour the stock through. This gets a lot of the med.-fine particles out. Then, if using muslin, place it opened over a colander, fill, then gather the ends and twist, forcing the stock through. Another method is to place something like a gravy boat into the filled muslin, and with two people, jiggle the muslin, letting the gravy boat scrape and push the stock through. I used to go to “baby’s r’ us” and buy organic cotton diapers instead of muslin, they are pretty durable and last quite a while—just that they get stained brown very quickly...
     
  5. mike9

    mike9

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    $0.50/kg - I am so jealous - LOL. But what @foodpump has said is good advice.
     
  6. LakeLargo

    LakeLargo

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    Thanks again guys. foodpump some really good advice there, that is going to save me a lot on ice and definitely a much better use of the remouillage to start the next batch.

    With regard to squeezing the stock through the muslin, do I not risk forcing more particles through the material?

    One more point that I am considering, I am doing 100kg at a time, my oven space for roasting the bones is limited and it is taking ages to get done. I have a large wood fired oven that is capable of doing the whole lot in one go. I tested it with a smaller batch of bones yesterday and it did the job perfectly, my concern is that the product is going to end up having a smoked flavour, it may be appealing to some but not others. Haven't put them in the pot yet but will be doing so today.

    Also as far a yield, to what point would you actually reduce the stock before packaging and selling it? Do I wait until it sets when chilled or reduce further for a more concentrated but lower yield product? Would there be harm in adding new water at the end if the stock was too concentrated to thin it slightly?

    Cheers
     
  7. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I would sell it when it sets like a hard jello. You can reduce by 1/2 but you’d have to sell at twice as much, so I dunno, “universal” would mean—for me, not reduced.

    The muslin doesn’t allow particles through, the crud gets lodged in the weave of the material and you need and more force the push the liquid through. What works well for me is to put a coarse china cap inside of a fine mesh one. These fine mesh ones are expensive, but if treated well will last years and to an excellent job. Set your caps ontop of the ubiquitous mayo bucket, open the valve on the kettle and fill until the cap won’t hold anymore. Turn off the valve, let some liquid flow through, remove the coarse cap, and now grasp the handle of the fine one and with your other hand make a fist and gently pound on the handle. You’ll be left with about a cup full of mushy crud and strained stock. Your choice to throw the crud into the remy or to toss it out. Keep on repeating until the pot is empty. It might seem tedious but it’s the fastest way I know of the strain finely