U.S. source for the unique and varied Italian dried pastas?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by monk, Nov 13, 2010.

  1. monk

    monk

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    Greetings -

    For weeks I have tried to find a source for Italian dried pasta that provides more than the 'typical' shapes (flat noodles, angel hair, elbows, penne, ziti.)  I'm referring to the dozens of smaller dried shapes that I read about or see on cooking shows.  I would enjoy using these different shapes, but apparently there is no demand for so many shapes here in the U.S.?  Even the DeCecco homepage is not as extensive as I'd hoped.  Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    The big brands do not make them. There are upscale specialty brands that do. In most cases if you have a high end Italian deli or gourmet shops they will have them  at about $1.99 to $3.99 pound. In some cases they even come in cello bags with bows on them.
     
  3. babytiger

    babytiger

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    I've been able to find special shapes at specialty shops and some local markets. A small market close by me actually sells Trenne, a triangular penne. Before I found that at the market, I just googled the pasta shape by name and found online sources.
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    There's a source out of Chicago called European Imports. They have all those hard to find pastas.
     
  5. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010