Tzaziki

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by chrisbelgium, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    This is how I make tzaziki, simple and easy.

    Peel a cucumber and cut in chunks. I do use the watery core too! Peel a clove of garlic and chop somewhat. Add both cucumber and garlic to a food processor, add salt as you would normally do for this amount of food to taste well.

    Pulse a few times; don't turn it into baby food, it still needs a little structure.

    Put in a sieve and let drip out for 15-30 minutes. Take a flexible spatula and press gently to get the water out. Take the preparation in your hands and squeeze some more water out, but not too enthusiastically, it needs just a bit of moist.

    Put in a bowl, add at least the same part of thick Greek yoghurt*. Add dill; fresh if available, dried (like here) if fresh one not available. Add seasoning and mix. Et voilà, simple as that.

    (*) you can use other yoghurt, but let it leak out overnight; gently put in a sieve over a bowl like in the 3th picture and let it sit in the fridge overnight. Don't press it out!!






     
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  2. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    You're implying that Greek yogurt is thicker than most other yogurts, lower in water content??
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I've always hand grated the cucumber and squeezed the water out.  But I really like the look of your processed cucumber.  I'll definitely try it that way next time.  Thanks!
     
  4. soesje

    soesje

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    real greek yoghurt is indeed thicker because it contains a percentage of cream.

    it's a bit like turkish yoghurt, which contains 10% cream. 

    therefore the water content is slightly lower. 

    I make tzatziki in a different way, by removing the watery centre of the cucumber and then cutting it in tiny dices.

    or coarsely grate it.

    then just use greek/ turkish yoghurt, with garlic. maybe some salt.
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Greek yougurt is strained overnight to allow the whey to filter out thus creating a thicker product.
     
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    This begs the question:  is the greek yogurt made using a higher fat dairy product (cream or half and half instead of milk as it were), or is it a product where the whey is strained off as in yogurt cheese?

    Here's the answer and scroll down a bit.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
  7. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Koko, I know in some yoghurt they add extra cream. I mostly use Greek yoghurt (made in Germany!) with a 10% fat content (don't tell my doctor). I use it for taste, but this yoghurt seems to hold much better together, it's compact.

    If I were to use low fat yoghurt, I would certainly let it leak out first so it doesn't "bleed" extra water into the tzaziki. You don't need to let it leak out until you have a dry ricotta-type of consistency. I love a thick consistency of my tzaziki, like in the picture.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    My yogurt is made using 40% cow's milk and 60% half and half and therefore 30% cream.  But, ChrisBelgium, is the cream in the greek yogurt added before or after it has been made and I believe that real greek yogurt is made using either sheep's or lamb's milk - a slightly different flavor I would think.
     
  9. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I always asked myself when they add the cream. My guess is before it is made. You're very right about the use of sheep milk.
     
  10. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Every time I see a recipe of tzatziki by someone who is not greek they always seem to omit the most important ingredients greeks use: olive oil and acid.  I usually use red wine vinegar but you can you any kind of vinegar or lemon if you like.  I roughly grate the cucumber because I love texture in the tzatziki and let it sit with salt before I wring it out.  And I use more garlic.... a lot more garlic lol, around 3-4 cloves per cup of yogurt.  If made right, tzatziki should be a little spicy from the garlic.  It's supposed to have a zing, it's not like a raita  which is supposed to cool and soothe.  

    Dill is optional.  In fact you can use any soft herb.  I'm partial to mint myself.  Sometimes I like to add scallion too.  But the olive oil and the vinegar are not optional.

    I once made tzatziki with roasted garlic puree.  It was lovely.  But it's an anathema to greeks.  Greeks are very particular about what they will condone as real greek food.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
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  11. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Ditto on the mint and garlic!

    I always buy Fage yogurt, made in Greec, which is widely available in the Uk supermarket chains.
     
  12. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Does anyone know when the cream is added to the mixture that is labeled greek yogurt: before or after the yogurt has been made?????     Inquiring minds want to know.

    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/lookaround.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/smiles.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif
     
  13. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I
    I use Fage too.
     
  14. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Have you tried making your own along with some added cream????
     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    No I haven't. My mother does and I know some others that do too. I'm happy with Fage.
     
  16. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I still, occasionally make my own yoghurt, but I always use Fage If Greek yoghurt is called for ;)
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    (EDIT)  This doesn't answer my question
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  18. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I snooped around a few websites to look up your enigma kokopuffs. Maybe this will clarify something;

    This website is in dutch http://www.karnelly.nl/grieks/artikelen/griekse_yoghurt.htm " and has a few answers...

    "Yoghurt is made from sheep and goatmilk and of course cow milk. They say that Greek have a thick buttermilk (tan), a rather grainy thick yoghurt called paskitán and a dried yoghurt that holds quite long called tsortán.

    They say also that when extra thick yoghurt is needed in a recipe, a few tbsp of sour cream or crème fraiche is added. This might maybe answer your question, kokopuffs, as when cream is added in the making of yoghurt. But...

    It also says that the secret of the best Greek yoghurt is leaking out. Thick creamy farm yoghurt is called yiaoúrti sakoúlas and seems to say "yoghurt from a bag", referring to the cheesecloth in which it leaks out. Thick commercial yoghurt with a fat percentage of 10% is called strangistó (meaning leaked). They also say that any yoghurt is perfect to leak out; full fat, medium fat or fat free. Adding a bit of salt speeds up the leaking process; put yoghurt in a colander clad with cheesecloth with a bit of salt.

    After one hour it will have lost 25% of its moist. After 4-5 hoursyou have some kind of yoghurt cheese..."
     
  19. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    MY yaourt has always been made with at least 30% cream and so therefore I am way ahead of the game along with my 40 years experience.  It has a really creamy mouthfeel and flavor.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  20. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Ok Koko, no need to get upset.