Turkey leg confit taco question

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by mano, May 30, 2012.

  1. mano

    mano

    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    For a gathering I'm going to confit 8 turkey legs in duck fat (thanks for the confit thread!) for tacos but need suggestions for what to serve as toppings.  I'm thinking of a red onion, julienne carrot and shredded cabbage saute' with a sauce of duck sauce and Thai chili garlic.  Not too labor intensive.

    BUT, I'm also smoking a pork butt which will go on buns with home made cole slaw and a vinegar based mop.

    Any thoughts and suggestions?  Too much slaw?
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2012
  2. rbandu

    rbandu

    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    For tacos I like to keep all the toppings raw/"fresh".  Beyond that, consider making a "ketchup" with tomatoes/tomatillos, dried cranberries, carrots, sage and shallots with some chilies for heat.  I like the whole global fusion thing you've got in your head.

    Lettuce/bok choy, etc.  A little vegetable crunch and moisture is what you're looking for.

    Some kind(s) of olive(s), sliced

    Fresh cheese of some kind, or maybe cojita...but less salty.

    Tomatoes as a standard, or maybe a pico de gallo, tweaked to match your flavors.

    Tacos are cheap, convenient food-cart munchables that have infinite possibilities.  The best taco I ever had was directly over the San Diego

     border.  It cost me 50 cents, it was delicious...and I have no idea what kind of meat it was.  Maybe I ate rat meat that day.  Still, it was tasty.
     
  3. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    177
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    maybe it was cato?
     
  4. rbandu

    rbandu

    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Haha *get out of my head, Ed*
     
  5. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    49
    Exp:
    Chef/Owner/Operator
    Was taught to make Mayan pork/BBQ that was served on tortillas with pickled onions, (hot mojo, quick cooled into brine) that was the bomb, also have used pickled julienned napa and mustard greens. When I say pickled it's a 2 minute process heat, cool, brine. 

    V based mop, how bout V & mustard based slaw NC style?

    Nicccce.....

    EDG
     
  6. mano

    mano

    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    Sounds good.  Do you have a recipe for the pickled stuff?
     
  7. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    49
    Exp:
    Chef/Owner/Operator
    Sure Mano,

    do you have access to commercial Mojo?, if not here's a recipe 

    4 cloves garlic, halved

     1 jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed and minced or your favorite chili pepper

    1/2 bunch cilantro, chopped

    1 medium onion minced

    1 1/2 cups sour orange (Seville orange) juice

    (In a pinch, use two parts orange to one part lemon and one part lime)

    2 Tablespoons white vinegar

    1 Tablespoon cumin

    2 Tablespoons fresh oregano

    Salt and pepper to taste

     food process, heat to slow boil over med high heat, store in fridge, will last a month+, great as a marinade for chicken, pork fish and even beef. Have used it on skirt for tacos or fajitas with Chimichurri.

    thinly slice purple onion julienne Napa and mustard greens, heat the mojo on high as soon as it comes to a rapid boil add the onions remove from heat stir for 1 minute, drain excess Mojo, fast chill to stop the cooking process and add to pickle brine, using the same mojo, add the mustard greens cook for 30-45 seconds, then add the Napa cook for an additional 30 seconds fast chill and brine as above add to separate pickle brine and I'd garnish with either fresh cilantro or cilantro-ed sour cream. The ratio of mustard to napa is by preference, personally prefer more mustard to napa but your safe with 50/50. As far as the brine you can use "pickle juice" or  

    Chopped fresh garlic
    1 tbsp. pickling spice
    Crushed dried red hot pepper (or a whole dried hot pepper)
     3/4 c. distilled white vinegar
    4 tbsp. Kosher salt to each qt. of water

    fresh dill to taste.

    Best,

    EDG
     
  8. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

    Messages:
    8,550
    Likes Received:
    203
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    It might be a good idea to lightly brine and lightly smoke the turkey legs before poaching them in fat. Also, while I'm a huge fan of duck fat, I think I'd use either olive oil or butter to "confit" the turkey legs. I doubt you'll get enough flavor benefit from the duck fat into the turkey leg meat to make the expense worthwhile. Better to use the duck fat where it can shine. For instance, you'd get a much bigger duck bang while using less precious duck fat using it to pan fry, turkey-confit flautas.

    Along the same lines, if you're going to confit or poach, I don't think I'd try to pump really strong flavors into the meat via a marinade or a ton of aromatics in the poaching fat. You want to highlight the subtleties of flavor and texture which come from the cooking method, not use so much spice that you bury them.

    BDL
     
  9. mano

    mano

    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    Thanks for your responses.

    EDG, your recipe sounds great, but to save time I'll make it another time.

    BDL, the legs are now curing in kosher salt, thyme, garlic and a few minced juniper berries.  I'll brine them and lightly smoke them along with the pork butt. 

    We befriended a French chef who sells us specialty ingredients (e.g. foie gras, rabbit, quail) and gives us duck fat and veal bones for stock at no charge.  I strain the fat after each confit and when it's worn out, he gives us more.  We have 4-5 quarts in the freezer.  

    Any thoughts on how I plan to serve it?
     
  10. drago

    drago

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    Maybe it was perro. But I'd love to have a taco out of San Diego.
     
  11. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    49
    Exp:
    Chef/Owner/Operator
    Mano,

    how'd your turkey confit tacos turn out?
     
  12. mano

    mano

    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    I ended up making it as described in the original post and it turned out great.  The veggies were fresh and crisp, the meat had good flavor and the sauce was a nice combo of sweet and savory.  The problem was the tacos, which were poor quality.  

    Thanks for asking.