Tuna... pork of the sea!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by pure instincts, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. pure instincts

    pure instincts

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    I don't understand why so many people like their tuna so over cooked and dry. Tuna has fat that melts at around human body temperature, and has rich flavorful red meat. My personal favorite way to eat tuna is to heat up a pan with a little olive oil, paint a room-temp tuna steak with a beaten egg, and then roll it in panko. And when I "fry" it, I basically just crisp the panko and leave 80% of the tuna still raw. It's like a pants party in my mouth.
     
  2. cyberdoc

    cyberdoc

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    My favorite way is raw on vinegared rice.
     
  3. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Don't know about Americans - but most British people who eat tuna would not overcook it - and as for covering in breadcrumbs? Naaaaah!:blush:
     
  4. pure instincts

    pure instincts

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    Yeah it must just be an American thing to eat it cooked all the way through. Mmm "cooking" it in citric acid is also a tasty nom I haven't done in way too long. =D
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Most Americans neither, Ishbel. In fact, until now I've never heard of anybody breading tuna.

    The most common method is to quick sear the outside and serve. They call the inside "rare" but raw is closer to the mark.
     
  6. french fries

    french fries

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    Which part of America are you located in? At least here in Southern California, tuna is typically served raw or barely seared. I don't think I've ever seen it served fully cooked.
     
  7. homemadecook

    homemadecook

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    I completely agree with you. I'm now craving for tuna sashimi! lol
     
  8. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Coat it in freshly ground black pepper and sea salt (Malden preferred). Just mix the two on a plate and roll the tuna in it. Sear in olive oil and butter - *very briefly, on all sides, just enough to get a crust. Slice and serve.

    Black on the outside, pink on the inside. A slight ring of pinkish white just under the crust, if you prefer it that way. Perfect.

    Serve with whatever tickles your fancy :) Plain mixed greens in a light dressing suits me. The tuna is king.
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Although I never seen it served overcooked (or even cooked) in restaurants I admit that sometimes I overcook my tuna on purpose. I find raw tuna to taste a little fishy. When I overcook it it tastes like pork lol.
     
  10. duckfat

    duckfat

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    "It's like a pants party in my mouth"

    TMI
    I have seen some tuna rolls that get breaded in panko and flash fried but the inside is still perfectly rare. They have to be served immediately so you get that crunchy-smooth and hot-cold contrast.
     
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    That is how I enjoy it as well, I use sesame oil , and a couple of turns of pepper. Other times, just a sear with a squeeze of lemon.
     
  12. gunnar

    gunnar

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    Unfortunately in the Podunk Capitol of California, I have served several fully cooked pieces of tuna. It really makes me sad.:cry: Most customers would say up front if its pink at all they would not pay. They didn't care how it was supposed to be served they wanted it their way. The panko crusted style would be some sort of Katsu variation I am guessing.
     
  13. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I'm really not liking this thread. All morning since I read this I have have that jingle stuck in my head.....

    Ask any Tuna You happen to sea, Whats the best tuna......



    argggggggggghhhhhh. :lol:
     
  14. grumio

    grumio

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    How odd - I have an old tuna jingle that gets stuck in my head too -

    Bum-bum-bumblebee tuna -
    I love Bumblebee
    Bumblebee too-oo-na
     
  15. french fries

    french fries

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    Hahahaha :lol:
     
  16. chefray

    chefray

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    Tuna for me is best cooked very hot, like wok hot, and very briefly. Just enough to firm the outside, slice on the bias, and onto a bed of tender greens.

    That, or what I had for lunch. Fatty Tuna, Salmon Roe, Rice, and Nori. Any Sushi aficionados here know what this concoction would be called? I get it all the time and I hate having to describe it to the waitress because I don't know the name.
     
  17. bazza

    bazza

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    A couple of years ago we were serving tuna on our lunch menu, customers kept sending it back saying that it wasn't cooked properly. We explained that it was supposed to be served rare or worst way medium rare and made it policy to tell everyone who ordered it. The response was "oh no, I'll have it well done please" We then got complaints that it was too dry (yawn). Sometimes you just can't win, ended up taking it off the menu :confused:
     
  18. chefray

    chefray

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    If people want tuna cooked well, it has to be cooked twice. Once to medium(on the rare side) and then sliced fairly thin and braised or steamed. It's not great, but it keeps it from going dish sponge dry.
     
  19. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    We went to Michael Psillakis restaurant Anthos in nyc not too long ago. I really wanted to order the yellowfin tuna and asked for it medium but they refused to serve it to me. They said it was served seared on the outside and rare on the inside and promptly directed me to order something else. I didn't mind at all, I understand that they didn't want to compromise the quality of sushi grade tuna like that and so I ordered something else.
     
  20. elizabethbryce@

    [email protected]

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    I cook my own tuna or salmon. I can't get it perfect yet as I like my fish more on the Asian side of cooking than the American side. This is mainly because when I first came to live here in the US, I became sort of "flavour of the month" person among my husband's friends. One couple brought us to their eldest kid and boyfriend's restaurant. I was served salmon so dry that I was scarred for life so I have never eaten any restaurant fish ever since. I serve fish once or twice a week here at home but I tend to look for more on the Asian side of cooking fish and had not touched tuna or salmon at all. Oh, I did actually, but they are usually, already canned and just for salad stuff.

    My question is...when you say cooking medium or cooked through, will it be the same like cooking steaks? How long for fish?:confused:

    Thanks...:mullet: