Trying to find the right time for a 3 1/2 lb pork roast to make pulled pork sandwiches.

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by hellno187, Jul 12, 2016.

  1. hellno187

    hellno187

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    Okay here's the deal, I've scoured the internet for recipes and the consensus I got was at 225 deg it takes 7-10 hours (or 1 /12 to 2 hours per lb) to get fall off the bone pork roast. I however never go off of time with meat, I always go by temp to know when it's done. Having said that the same recipes that tell me 7-10 hours also state prime temp at 198-200 deg internal temp. So thinking I had at least 7 hours I inserted my wireless bbq thermometer and put my roast in at 11:30 for a 6:30 serve time. However I'm now 2 hours in and my internal temp is 150 and I'm starting to panic a little thinking this roast will be done waaaaaaaay before I want it to. Should I drop oven temp to 200 deg or so, or am I over thinking this (which god knows I over think everything lol) what do you guys think?
     
  2. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    You didn't say how many pounds. It will stall and increase slowly. Don't panic yet.
     
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  3. hellno187

    hellno187

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    Yeah I put it in the title, but it's 3 1/2 pounds.
     
  4. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    Opps. Smatphone app cuts off the title. Keep an eye on it. Look and read here : 

    http://amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/perfect_pulled_pork.html

    "When the meat hits 150 to 160°F, moisture moves to the surface and starts evaporating and cooling the meat like sweat on a marathon runner. As a result, the meat temp will not rise for as long as 5 hours. It stalls at 150 to 160°F. And it significantly lengthens the cook and drives people nuts. But this process helps dry the exterior and form bark."
     
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  5. mike9

    mike9

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    What type of cut is it?  Time/temp = doneness will be dictated by the amount of collagen that needs breaking down.  Working cuts like shoulder take a long time while resting cuts cook more quickly.
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Hopefully the OP will return and let us know how things turned out.  While I understand the stall (pork shoulder is one of my favorite things to barbecue) I do think that 7 hours is a little long for 3 1/2 pound cut.  I usually do full pork butts in 8-10 hours and those range in size from about 8 to 12 pounds.  Depending on how it was cut I would have planned on 4-6 hours max.  The good news is that pork shoulder holds really well, wrapped in foil and held in a 150-170°F oven.  You will lose the crispy bark, but the meat will stay moist and tender.  That's better than shredding it, cooling it down and trying to reheat.
     
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  7. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It will probably be ready too soon but that's ok, wrap it well in foil and keep it warm inside a cooler, it'll be fine and it'll stay warm.  Reheat the liquid it cooked in, that'll get it even hotter at serving time.
     
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  8. hellno187

    hellno187

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    Hey everyone thanks for the replies sorry I didn't get back yesterday I got caught up making my potato salad side and peanut butter caramel bars dessert. The temperature climb did slow down a bit, but Pete is right it doesn't take 7 hours for a 3 1/2 lb pork shoulder to cook at 225. I was pretty close with my calculations it was closer to 5 to 5 1/2 hours and it hit about 200 deg internal temp and ended up being OK. Next time however I'll pull it out closer to 185-195 deg, because even though it was a hit (probably because I brined/marinaded it for 12+ hours) I thought it was a little dry. So again sorry for the late reply I got caught up in finishing up the rest of the meal, but all your input helped me a lot as usual that's why I always go here for cooking questions. Thanks everyone!!
     
  9. hellno187

    hellno187

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    Just curious Pete, what cut would you use and just how do you bbq it without losing moisture? I bbq a lot of my pork like tenderloin etc. and I've considered bbq for pulled pork but haven't found a technique I wanted to use yet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2016
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I would never "barbecue" pork loin or tenderloin as it doesn't have enough internal fat and connective tissue to stay moist in the long, slow cooking process.  Tenderloin I would do directly over coals (burner).  When it comes to loin, depending on the size I would do it either directly over heat or do indirect grilling.  The nuances between indirect grilling and barbecuing are kind of fluid, but generally with indirect grilling you would still be using a higher heat than what you use in barbecuing.

    As for how I do my pulled pork, I literally just posted an article on that topic, here on Chef Talk, a few days ago.
    Article: Pulled Pork

    It's a pretty standard recipe and technique and I've never had a problem with it being dry as there is plenty of fat and connective tissue.  I pretty much use whole bone-in pork butts (part of the shoulder).  They usually come in around 7-10 pounds.  I've seen smaller but wouldn't recommend them.  I've had great luck doing them both in my smoker and on my Weber kettle grill as shown by the picture, in the article, with 3 butts packed onto my weber, slowly cooking away.

    In the article I do, briefly talk about the "stall" which I say usually happens around 180°F.  I've had it happen anywhere from about 160-180°F and it can cause quite a panic.  Even after having done so many butts I still sometimes have to fight the urge to crank up the heat is a stall is taking longer than I think it should.
     
  11. hellno187

    hellno187

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    You're missing out than because I brine and use the indirect heat method and bbq a mean tenderloin lol. I'll check your thread on bbqing pulled pork, and I think I'll do a bone in next time also, because I believe the flavor would be better. Thanks for the info Pete.
     
  12. teamfat

    teamfat

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    grilling is not bbq.
     
  13. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Totally agree.
     
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  14. hellno187

    hellno187

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    OK guys I apologize, I had no idea the cooking terminology police were on duty lol.

    Hey wait after a quick Google I found my use wasn't wrong at least by what I read on the sites Forkful, Agricultured, The Shed BBQ, Big Daddys Kitchen, Firepit etc. etc.

    They all said the the difference between bbq and grilling is grilling is done at high temp for short periods of time, where as bbq is done low and slow (usually with indirect heat). So by that definition my low and slow indirect heat method is bbqing, at least by what I've read over multiple sites.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
  15. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    It's always good to clarify terms so the discussion isn't "apples and oranges". Seems to me more clarification than policing.

    BTW, BBQ (smoke or cook low-and-slow) a bone-in pork butt or shoulder one day. The amount of collegen from the bone/skin will surprise you and make the meat much more moist than with boneless pork.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
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  16. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    IMO you don't need to temp a cut like that.  It's done when it's done. If your thermometer goes in easy but it only reads 190, what you gonna do?  If it's over 200 but it is hard to probe what are you gonig to do?  Trust your instincts not a temp at one spot.

    PS- about your fancy leave in probes.  I don't use this.  I spot check with a thermapen when i think it's ready.   Your metal probe conducts heat very well..  cooking the meat around it faster.  how accurate is that?  Of course it always reads high
     
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  17. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    That is reasonably correct. Where the disagreement appears to remain is the notion of BBQ cooking of lean pork cuts like loin and tenderloin for pulled pork. Definitely not traditional and generally results in dry meat. But if you make it happen, that's good for you!
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
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  18. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I think we all have our own interpretation of terminology. Cooking is very personal after all. But also people's tastes differ vastly. I'm in Greece at the moment and the type of meat Americans enjoy is thought of as disgusting here. Here meat is overcooked no matter what the cut. The drier the better. The harder the better. Going to people's houses for dinner here makes my jaw ache. But they love it, what can I say?
     
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  19. hellno187

    hellno187

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    Yeah it works out really well, I'm not sure why all the hoopla over cooking lean pork on a gas grill because there are tons of recipes on doing just that.

    In fact I received a new email recipe on cooking a pork tenderloin on a gas grill from Allrecipes just this morning lol.
     
  20. hellno187

    hellno187

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    Yeah I can imagine eating all that dry meat would make your jaw ache, LOL! I hear ya, it just caught me off guard to get all the feedback over the use of bbq, especially after reading my terminology wasn't that off if at all.