Trying New Foods

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kaneohegirlinaz, Jun 4, 2011.

  1. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Yesterday, we had lunch at this great bakery/sandwich joint.  On Fridays they bake Chocolate Babka.  Neither my husband nor I had ever had this type of bread (that's not a big thing in Hawaii).  So we decided to try just a “baby babka” for breakfast this morning.  I gave it a quick heat up and slathered my piece in loads of sweet butter (hubby doesn’t care for any dairy). 

    Man-o-man alive, what have we been missing?!

    It’s a good thing they only make this on Friday. 

    That was delicious. 

    Now we need to find brioche.
     
  2. longcolts

    longcolts

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    I take it you're rather new to Arizona then?
     
  3. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    ... four years here in AZ

    .... the rest was in Honolulu...

    [​IMG]
     
  4. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Forget brioche. Find yourself a Filipino bakery and get some ensaymada. It's like brioche x100. The first one will blow your mind.Try the macapuno and ube versions too.
     
  5. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It's amazing how different parts of the U.S. have such diverse culinary offerings.  I live in NY and I wouldn't recognize a babka if it was sitting in front of me, though I'm pretty sure it's something I can find here.  You have inspired me to seek it out. 

    I remember when I first moved to NY and discovered what a real bagel was all about.  It was an unforgettable experience, I still love those little evil round things. 
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    When I lived in NY over 25 years ago every Jewish Bakery made Babka.  The best Bagel Bakery was H&H uptown NY. And Pizza was best at any dirty Brooklyn place.
     
  7. panini

    panini

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    "And Pizza was best at any dirty Brooklyn place.  "" "'  """    

    Hey! Watch it! My Family resembles that comment!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Oh yeah yeah, that took me awhile, I even had to "google" that (we've been away too long).

    Those are very tasty.  I seem to recall this Asian Market that we found carries those.

    What I have started in our household is to try new dishes and re-try foods.  

    Maybe something we've never had or made a different way of the things that we don't care for. (we now enjoy brussel sprouts)

    So, I asked the question:

    What have you tried that was new for you?
     
  9. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    ... and heh, how about that photo above??
     
  10. longcolts

    longcolts

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    Too much salt in the water, and a touch to much magnesium!  XD
     
  11. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    I had an honest-to-goodness bagel in NEW YORK CITY years ago and it was FAB-U!! 

    Notch with all the trappings, heavy on the cream cheese, no measly schemer for me, thank you.

    And as for Babka, I also googled that and found many different images, and I assure, the one here was not pictured. 

    I guess different foods in different parts of the country are made differently,

    and as my girl MARTHA says, “that’s a good thing”. 
     
  12. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    you know salt water is great for your skin!
     
  13. rgm2

    rgm2

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    I moved to Seattle about a year ago now and I tried Indian food for the first time and I LOVED it. I also had very traditional Thai food in our international district and that was an amazement for the taste buds. I love to try new things, unfortunately with my salary as a line cook here, I am not able to adventure out as much as I could in Phoenix. I make a very good wage for what I have heard here for my experience also. I do not know how you all do it personally, however I do live in a very nice part of town. Good thing I have a suga-momma! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    All in good time I suppose. 
     
  14. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Man RGM2, I wish we were in the greater Phoenix area!!  I miss going out to eat sssoooooo much. Maybe some goof take out food!!  Where we are now, ugh!! 

    I make three squares a day.  You should see my recipe "binder" of recipes that I've collected from other people so that I can cook our favs. 

    Food, or maybe I should say eating here is just a necessity, surely nothing "fancy". 

    We're planning a cocktail party with "heavy pupus" instead of a sit down dinner (not enough room for one thing)

    and I was thinking of making things that we would have at any home you would go to in Hawaii.

    Alas, that's a little too adventurous for the folks 'round these parts.
     
  15. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    REALLY do not care for chicken breast (too dry), but gave it a nother go tonight on the grill.

    They came out ok, not over done and spiced nicely.
     
  16. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Try brining them.
     
  17. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Most people overcook chicken breast one way or another. If you pound them a little first so that the breast is even in shape , it will cook evenly. Most are to well on ends and outer perimeter and not cooked enough in center. Make sure you start cooking them at room  temp NOT out of fridge., as this will take the heat longer to penetrate and hasten over cooking on outside . Marinades will help the flavor and slightly tenderize them in some cases, but the real trick is do not overcook.
     
  18. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    And forget the USDA temperature recommendations. 180F=shoe leather.
     
  19. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    KG, I developed my own procedure on both chickenbreast and porkloin. Both are notorious easy to overcook and dry out. I never use a grill on these, it's always overcooked.

    How I cook my chickenbreasts but keep them still moist?

    - Flavor them first; dry them with paper kitchentowel, cut some fresh tarragonleaves and sprinkle over the meat. Use whatever herb(s) you like, but tarragon and chicken are a perfect match. Cut a clove of garlic in slices and sprinkle over. Some good turns of the black pepper mill (don't use the finest position). NO salt!! Pour a little sunflower oil over the meat, rub and and let all those flavors get transmitted by the oil into the meat for 15 minutes or longer. Time doesn't matter. If you do a longer marinating, put this preparation in a plasticbag in your fridge.

    - Use a non-stick pan and bring it to a normal high heat. Add no more than a few drops of sunflower oil. Take the slices of garlic from the chicken but leave the rest on it, especially the oil. Put the meat in the pan with a small tbsp of marinating oil and DO NOT move the meat around, simply don't touch it. Turn after a good minute and leave again to get a nice crust.

    - Reduce the fire to a normal low (let's say 20% of the available power) and cover the pan with a large sheet of aluminiumfoil. It does not need to be sealed entirely!! Cook this way for another 10-15 minutes. Push your indexfinger on the meat regurlarly. When it gets somewhat ferm, it's done.

    - Take the aluminiumfoil and roll the chickenbreast in them for the time to make a sauce... =5 minutes at least! Your chicken will be perfect.

    - Want the quickest sauce? Sweat a chopped shallot in the same pan. Deglaze your pan with a dash of white wine and maybe half a cup of chickenstock and let reduce a few minutes on high fire. If you don't have chickenstock at hand, use water instead with a tbsp of light soy sauce and/or break a small corner from a Knorr chicken bouillon cube and put it in. Add half a cup of cream and reduce. Taste for s&p. Maybe some extra tarragon in it or chives or parcely or... whatever you like. Also try spices like a pinch of ras al hanut or garam masala (delicious on porkloin!)...

    As I said, I use the same procedure for porkloin when cooking it on the stovetop. I use fresh or dried sage on it instead of tarragon.
     
  20. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    'ya know thetincook, alot of the chicken in the mega super markets today (i.e. frozen Tyson) are already brined. 

    I didn't know that until I was watching a cooking program on TV and it was suggested that you read

    the bag and it's ingredients.  Sure enough, "salt solution".

    Granted, I could buy fresh chicken, but we don't live close to anything,

    so I have a nice chest freezer that I stock about every 2 months or so.