Tri tip temps for transport

Discussion in 'Professional Catering' started by barry carlton, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. barry carlton

    barry carlton

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    I usually stay very local, but I have a venue about 45 min to an hour out of town coming up in Sept. I need to pre cook tri tips for sandwiches and finish them on the grill. I can keep them warm during transport so that is not an issue. I want to cook them to temp in my oven, then finish them on the grills provided on venue. What temp should I shoot for? I was thinking 105, a friend in the school system said she agreed, another said less (90), another at the restaurant I work at says higher (120). So with the driving time, which is still well within the "Safe Zone", what temp would you stop the oven cooking to keep them rare to medium rare after re-warming over a charcoal grill?
     
  2. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Um, well at 45 minutes away, and with access to a grill onsite anway, why the pre-cook?

    Especially on a quality cut like tri-tip? If you did a refridge-temp transport, and threw them on the barbie onsite, you'd have fresh cooked. Tri-tip cooks fast on the grill, prob take close to the same time to cold-grill as to finsh-grill--only without the 45 minute rest enroute.

    Plus no safe-zone to worry about.
     
  3. barry carlton

    barry carlton

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    I have been doing tri tip fro all of my adult life (I am from Fresno originally and tri tip was a very economical cut years ago)  I have always done them on site but this is a wedding of friends and I need to be there for the ceremony and do not want to make the guests wait 45 minutes to an hour for the cooking, resting, and carving of the meat. I.E. just trying to shave some time off the cooking time.

    Gotta love these charity things........yes I really do.
     
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    You can hold but only at about 160 degrees tops for that amount of time. Makee sure its a moist heat as to not dry out.
     
  5. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Exactly, I too was worried about them drying out, and twice cooked (even if not fully) just seemed it might ruin the great flavor of decent tri. I also wasn't considering on site carving, (was assuming portioned transport, cook/rest on site), but would depend on how early you could arrive--on a wedding usually a small window, and your situation is different etc, ergo not practical for you. It was just that long transport that had me worried for Tri, but if you can get away with it....

    ....and Chef Ed, 'sure that's not too high a hold for tri-tip? (just wonderin, as he had indicated a rare to medium rare end-product)
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    I'm not sure what your total hold time is nor an I clear as to intended service, i.e. plated or sandwiches /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif

    If you absolutely HAVE to cook and transport, I'd consider wrapping the cooked (120°-125° internal temp) tri-tip in plastic/foil and holding in a Cambro/cooler, preheated preferably, that should be adequate for , um say, 3-4 hours, much as you could do with many other cuts of beef. Especially if you are planning to heat for service.