Trends in decoration, food plating and products? Let's keep up with the times.

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Joined Jan 14, 2021
Hi everyone! My name is Alexander, I am a chef in Russia and would like to know your honest opinions / observations / etc. I know far too well how hard the COVID situation hit us all, and even though it struck us hard, this is not the time to back down. I am interested in trends (described in the title) which might be appearing all over the world in the next 6 months or so. What I mean is even with all the websites and instagrams in the world I feel ripped apart from the main culinary scene, and even though I fully understand that my cooking should express my own way and outlook, but its still nice to know these little details to work more professionally. I apologize for any structural/grammatical mistakes in my thread, afterall, English is my second language. Thanks in advance chefs, and good luck to you all!
 
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
Can you be more specific? You seem to be asking for two answers. One for trends in the coming months and the second for details for working more professionally.
As for trends, I think everyone will have to get back on their feet before any trends show themselves.
Are there specific professional tips you are looking for?
 
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Joined Dec 13, 2020
Hi Chef Alexander, I think I understand your question or perhaps some of it. Personally I am a Chef working in resort most of my career and hardly we do follow trend. We only do things to satisfy customers sometimes might even be very simple cooking and for some occasion some customers thanks for making their memory back to their childhood food. "What you heart say?" It is nice to see all this magazine pictures of food but in the end many honest cooking and simplicity and simple way of plating as well. just straight to the food and honest presentation and might also look into Dining ware that you have or look on something unique and keep it as yours only. Please let me know what type of concept you are producing. I might be able to assist you more specifically
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
Welcome to ChefTalk Alexander.
As far as trends go, I feel that the food NOW takes center stage. Before Covid, plate presentation was coupled with flavors and combinations. Hard thing to do in plastic or Styrofoam.
Here in the US, restaurants are closed to indoor dining. Many places have shuttered their businesses, never to open again. Those that remain open, are delivery or curbside pick-up only.
Trends in food come and go, but attention to flavor combinations, and taste will never go out of style.
Be well Chef.
 
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Joined Jan 14, 2021
Hi Chef Alexander, I think I understand your question or perhaps some of it. Personally I am a Chef working in resort most of my career and hardly we do follow trend. We only do things to satisfy customers sometimes might even be very simple cooking and for some occasion some customers thanks for making their memory back to their childhood food. "What you heart say?" It is nice to see all this magazine pictures of food but in the end many honest cooking and simplicity and simple way of plating as well. just straight to the food and honest presentation and might also look into Dining ware that you have or look on something unique and keep it as yours only. Please let me know what type of concept you are producing. I might be able to assist you more specific.

Hello, Chef Piya! Thanks for your reply, my restaurant is a relatively small, local place, we specialise in Neapolitan pizza & homemade pasta, but we do other types of dishes as well. The concept is simple, we assembled a team of high quality staff and our goal is to serve high quality ingredients made in a simple and understandable way. With a cozy touch of "grandma's house" vibe, but in a more modern setting, if you know what I mean. I just wanted to get a fresh look on the industry and maybe upgrade our decoration technique, because we aim for somewhat simple dishes, but sometimes simple dishes are the hardest to properly present without them looking unimpressive.
 
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Joined Jan 14, 2021
Welcome to ChefTalk Alexander.
As far as trends go, I feel that the food NOW takes center stage. Before Covid, plate presentation was coupled with flavors and combinations. Hard thing to do in plastic or Styrofoam.
Here in the US, restaurants are closed to indoor dining. Many places have shuttered their businesses, never to open again. Those that remain open, are delivery or curbside pick-up only.
Trends in food come and go, but attention to flavor combinations, and taste will never go out of style.
Be well Chef.
Hey, Chef Ross! Thanks for your thoughts, I completely agree that without a great taste and texture presentation will indeed fall flat. How is your restaurant doing, you guys survive by delivering orders and doing take aways?
 
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Joined Jan 14, 2021
Can you be more specific? You seem to be asking for two answers. One for trends in the coming months and the second for details for working more professionally.
As for trends, I think everyone will have to get back on their feet before any trends show themselves.
Are there specific professional tips you are looking for
Hey, Chef Writer! I may be a touch ignorant about the whole lockdown situation since where I am at the moment they did take off all of the restrictions, so this is indeed the time for us to get back on our feet and start producing something creative. How is your restaurant doing right now? As for specific professional tips, i am just interested in general techniques that might come in handy for a modern presentation nowadays, as was the case with spherification and lecithin foams in the 2000s-2010s for example
 
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
I am in New York State. Lockdowns/quarantines/business closures/social distancing/mask wearing are all still in full effect. Many restaurants have closed permanently and others are struggling to get by with take out only or take out with limited seating. No one is sure when this will all end so everyone is simply trying to last until it's over.
As for techniques, I think the ones like foams, spherification etc. are always useful if used simply and in unexpected ways. They have now become part of the arsenal of techniques we all have and like other techniques are not to be over done but used thoughtfully when appropriate.
When doing simple dishes, much can be done by taking great care with handling the ingredients at every stage in producing the dish.
For example, In one of Gordon Ramseys videos he points out to a novice that the novice left the outside of the soufflé cup dirty with streaks of raw soufflé batter. Not as noticeable when raw but when the soufflé is cooked, the sloppy outside becomes baked as well and then is very noticeable. The same soufflé in a very clean container is a thing of beauty.
Chef Alfred Portale of the Gotham Bar and Grill in NYC served a bowl of gazpacho. While the flavor of the soup was fine, he made it very elegant by peeling cherry or grape tomatoes, stored for service in olive oil. They went in the middle of the bowl. Supported by the tomatoes just above the soup was a long bias cut crouton, one half covered in tapenade, the other in celery pearls made by spherification. So the gazpacho was mostly traditional with a clever surprise using modern techniques but not overwhelming the presentation.
A member of ChefTalk has a video using won ton egg wrappers for making lasagna which enables making individual portions much easier and depending on your presentation style much more elegant.
Parmesan crisps are easily made and can be used to garnish just about any pasta dish.
Alain Ducasse liked presenting a dish with the same ingredient cooked three ways. A dish might have a puree of X, Fried X and a slice of raw X along with the other ingredients.
Deconstructions of dishes were popular for awhile. In some instances it was a great idea and made for a great presentation. If done badly, it could look pretty stupid. Still a valid tool in any chefs arsenal depending on the dish.
Using stencils when putting powders on a dish is an interesting option. Doesn't have to be limited to powdered sugar and desserts. If you make fresh vegetable powders or grated/powdered cheese, a stencil might provide a fresh look for one of your dishes.
I don't know how much access you have to the cookbooks of the world's great chefs but I prefer the ones with bright color photos so I can see what the chef envisions his dish should look like. Study the techniques used in those presentations. Youtube has scores of videos about techniques and presentations. Some by chefs, some by very clever home cooks. Masterchef Professional with Marcus Waring is a good look at what 3 star Michelin places concern themselves with.
Whatever techniques and presentation styles you mimic, remember that the general public doesn't have the same knowledge or awareness that you do. They don't necessarily know (or care) that a technique was popular during a specific time period or that other chef's may think the technique or style is "dated". So don't dismiss an idea simply for that reason alone. You may find a particular technique or presentation idea is appropriate for a specific dish on your menu. Mix and match the ideas you discover according to your time, place and customers. Many different ideas incorporated across the entirety of you menu will prevent your place from being classified by any time period or style. If it works, it works.
Mostly you should remember that every detail of a dish is important and should be given careful consideration. Above all else, remember Chef Ross's advice. First and foremost are Flavor and appropriate food combinations. Taste your food as you cook and make sure the dish stands on it's own. The fanciest presentation in the world won't save a dish that tastes bad.
 
6
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Joined Jan 14, 2021
I am in New York State. Lockdowns/quarantines/business closures/social distancing/mask wearing are all still in full effect. Many restaurants have closed permanently and others are struggling to get by with take out only or take out with limited seating. No one is sure when this will all end so everyone is simply trying to last until it's over.
As for techniques, I think the ones like foams, spherification etc. are always useful if used simply and in unexpected ways. They have now become part of the arsenal of techniques we all have and like other techniques are not to be over done but used thoughtfully when appropriate.
When doing simple dishes, much can be done by taking great care with handling the ingredients at every stage in producing the dish.
For example, In one of Gordon Ramseys videos he points out to a novice that the novice left the outside of the soufflé cup dirty with streaks of raw soufflé batter. Not as noticeable when raw but when the soufflé is cooked, the sloppy outside becomes baked as well and then is very noticeable. The same soufflé in a very clean container is a thing of beauty.
Chef Alfred Portale of the Gotham Bar and Grill in NYC served a bowl of gazpacho. While the flavor of the soup was fine, he made it very elegant by peeling cherry or grape tomatoes, stored for service in olive oil. They went in the middle of the bowl. Supported by the tomatoes just above the soup was a long bias cut crouton, one half covered in tapenade, the other in celery pearls made by spherification. So the gazpacho was mostly traditional with a clever surprise using modern techniques but not overwhelming the presentation.
A member of ChefTalk has a video using won ton egg wrappers for making lasagna which enables making individual portions much easier and depending on your presentation style much more elegant.
Parmesan crisps are easily made and can be used to garnish just about any pasta dish.
Alain Ducasse liked presenting a dish with the same ingredient cooked three ways. A dish might have a puree of X, Fried X and a slice of raw X along with the other ingredients.
Deconstructions of dishes were popular for awhile. In some instances it was a great idea and made for a great presentation. If done badly, it could look pretty stupid. Still a valid tool in any chefs arsenal depending on the dish.
Using stencils when putting powders on a dish is an interesting option. Doesn't have to be limited to powdered sugar and desserts. If you make fresh vegetable powders or grated/powdered cheese, a stencil might provide a fresh look for one of your dishes.
I don't know how much access you have to the cookbooks of the world's great chefs but I prefer the ones with bright color photos so I can see what the chef envisions his dish should look like. Study the techniques used in those presentations. Youtube has scores of videos about techniques and presentations. Some by chefs, some by very clever home cooks. Masterchef Professional with Marcus Waring is a good look at what 3 star Michelin places concern themselves with.
Whatever techniques and presentation styles you mimic, remember that the general public doesn't have the same knowledge or awareness that you do. They don't necessarily know (or care) that a technique was popular during a specific time period or that other chef's may think the technique or style is "dated". So don't dismiss an idea simply for that reason alone. You may find a particular technique or presentation idea is appropriate for a specific dish on your menu. Mix and match the ideas you discover according to your time, place and customers. Many different ideas incorporated across the entirety of you menu will prevent your place from being classified by any time period or style. If it works, it works.
Mostly you should remember that every detail of a dish is important and should be given careful consideration. Above all else, remember Chef Ross's advice. First and foremost are Flavor and appropriate food combinations. Taste your food as you cook and make sure the dish stands on it's own. The fanciest presentation in the world won't save a dish that tastes bad.
Sorry to hear about your tough situation, I really hope you guys can manage and stay open! These times are indeed tough for our business. Thanks for a long answer, the information really helped! Stay well, stay focused and don't give up hope, restaurants shall rise again when this whole thing blows over.
 
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Joined Nov 27, 2012
Here is something that I've been wanted to replicate since my girlfriend had it in the states and told me about when she came back to china. There is this restaurant in somewhere in New York(I think it was there) that is making raviolis (the big ones)but somehow the filling is a clear chicken broth with a couple of other ingredients(bits of meat and veg). apparently each one is sealed as raviolis usually are and a bit of an explosion once you bite into them, amazing she tells me and super super tasty. I am guessing that its a normal ravioli(maybe a bit thicker than usual) using a flavored chicken stock reduction(reduced enough so its a hard gel when cold) and bits of meat as a filling. seems like a genius idea and nothing out of this world in difficulty. Dress it up as you will but should be a stunner either way.
 
6
0
Joined Jan 14, 2021
Here is something that I've been wanted to replicate since my girlfriend had it in the states and told me about when she came back to china. There is this restaurant in somewhere in New York(I think it was there) that is making raviolis (the big ones)but somehow the filling is a clear chicken broth with a couple of other ingredients(bits of meat and veg). apparently each one is sealed as raviolis usually are and a bit of an explosion once you bite into them, amazing she tells me and super super tasty. I am guessing that its a normal ravioli(maybe a bit thicker than usual) using a flavored chicken stock reduction(reduced enough so its a hard gel when cold) and bits of meat as a filling. seems like a genius idea and nothing out of this world in difficulty. Dress it up as you will but should be a stunner either way.
Hello!
Wow, sounds like a great idea! I think i heard of people in South-east Asia doing these with dumplings and frozen consomme. Do you think that concentrated, almost demi glace like, texture wont be a mouthful if each of the ravioli has a portion of it inside? Still, thanks for the tip, sounds amazing tbh.
 
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Joined Nov 27, 2012
well you are right there are dumplings with soup inside over in China at least. They are however done not with consomme/demi but with very fatty ingredients mixed with broth(think composite meatballs if that makes sense) so once they cook the fat will render and make a soup. they are absolutely stunning and very similar. For the size it depends on how you play with it, I would go with chicken in order to not make it to heavy in taste but everything could potentially work tbh.
 
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