Tournee or tourne

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Can anyone provide why the tournee/tourne cut has 7 sides? Please provide a source in a book, magazine, or website.
 
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I am looking for a history, origin, or the "father" of the tourne cut? Cite in a website, book, or magazine article.
 
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I'd be glad to make something up about honoring the mayors anniversary and the seven bridges or the seven spires in the village where the cut originated but, I can't do that with a clear conscience!

If you do find the answer, let us know!

Then you can find out when, who and why somebody called it "dice".
 
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Sarcasm - I am use to. Honesty - I am use to. I see you don't know the answer with. Just say so. Just like issuing a tasking the kitchen - you want you want when you want it and when it is achieved/accomplished you are thankful to your staff for working well together. Nothing more. Nothing less.
 
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I gave you the best known answer. Please do not be ungrateful.

And welcome to the forum. But remember... we’re not on your payroll or your staff.
 
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4,474
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I don't presume to speak for anyone else but I think what is being suggested is while no one minds answering a question for a peer, to be ordered to provide the source is going a tiny bit far.
You obviously have internet access and everyone's time is equally important.

Not sayin' just sayin'
mimi
 
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No ungratefulness here. I am married to a chef that works long hours to hone his craft and learn new techniques. Thanks for the welcome. I'll post the answer when it is found.

It is not fair at all. It is a very hard question to find the answer to and they is why being involved in the culinary world is fascinating. When you accomplish a hard dish that you are happy with, the chef you worked under is happy, and the customer is happy. Nothing like a great feeling of satisfaction and success in accomplishing a task that is hard.
 
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But I have a question. I like trivia and detailed knowledge too, but why is academic rigor needed? Just curious.
 
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Completely get where you are coming from.
Being the SO of someone who is attached to their job 24/7 can leave one weary.
Not to mention the fact that if you can take up a bit of their slack you are rewarded with a few precious moments to share a cup of coffee.
.....or whatever.... ;-)

mimi
 
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Hey chefswife18!

Here is an idea!

Send an e-mail to the Food network care of: "Food, Fact or fiction". That is a show that primarily deals with the history and origins of food related things! Let their staff do the research!
 
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It's an excellent question, and I wish I had an answer for you.

As to why references: because in food, as in so many areas, people will happily claim to know facts that are nothing of the kind. In the course of research on Japanese knives, for example, I've come across an amazing array of known facts that are actually hogwash. I agree with the OP: no answer to the question posed is in fact an answer if it's not sourced.

Here's what could help, though: "I vaguely remember seeing/hearing that X demanded 7 sides, way back when, but I don't have a reference." That would be a great place to start. Any ideas?
 
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Been doing some research on this subject as well. All I get is that it's done, and why it's done, but nothing about it's history.

So far the best answer I've come up with is from an article written by Sophie Brickman in May of 20011 when she wrote:

"Each turned vegetable must have 7 sides. Why 7 you ask? To know this is to have complete insight into the brain of the the person with the silly tall white hat which is impossible."

It would seem that this is something picked up along the way and continued to be standard operating procedure in a French kitchen. Maybe it was to make the vegetables most Tourne (potatoes, turnips, carrots, parsnips) to look more attractive on the plate.

Did you also know that Tourne vegetable cuts also have been further categorized by size:

1)Bouquetiere (3 cm in length)
2) Cocotte (5 cm)
3) Vapeur (6 cm)
4) Chateau (7.5 cm), and
5) Fondante (8-9 cm)
 
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7 sides allows you to place the vegetable flat on its back and have the presentation side be nicely shaped and not flat.

Source: Not sure but I think I remember reading that in an Escoffier book that I no longer own.
 

kuan

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Staff member
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It doesn't have to be seven. Seven for competition, five for dinner service.
 

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