Topping for a flourless chocolate cake

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by scottr, Mar 27, 2017.

  1. scottr

    scottr

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    Once again, I have been charged with making a flourless chocolate cake--flourless because two of those who will be eating it have celiac.

    Among such recipes I've had great success with the one in Shirley Corriher's "Bakewise," which is naturally gluten free (by "naturally" I just mean that you don't have to make GF substitutions).

    The question I've been pondering is how to top it. 

    In the past I've served it plain, sprinkled with powdered sugar, glazed it with ganache, and done a thick layer of a yolkless chocolate mousse. 

    I was debating making a sort of s'mores version, using this for the graham cracker  and this for the marshmallow.

    My order of baking would be the graham crackers maybe two days before, and the cake and marshmallow the day before. 

    I will have to make this the day before serving it (I have to transport it a several hour drive that day and there won't be time for baking that morning). I could do final assembly same-day: layer the graham crackers on top of the cake, then spoon on the marshmallow and torch it (maybe even at the end of the trip--I don't know if that'll matter). 

    My main question is for the marshmallow topping: should I be using a more traditional homemade marshmallow (i.e., firmer set)? I'd have to cut it up and pile it on, but I didn't know 1) if the spoonable marshmallow would weep over the course of 5-6 or so hours before serving, and 2) it would be too wet to be torched.

    Any other ideas or suggestions?
     
  2. rlyv

    rlyv

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    I think regular marshmallows would probably be easiest, especially for transport and appearance. Sometimes marshmallow creme can deflate and not have that fluffiness when it's first made.
    Cut marshmallows would also give lots of edges for torching, which is the best part :).
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    sorry. You seem to have my question/concern covered. I don't generally click links embedded in posts when I can't see beforehand where it's headed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
  4. scottr

    scottr

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    Thanks.
    Would regular marshmallows shift/fall off (the cake and each other) during transport? 

    The appealing part about using a creme is that smooth, meringue-like appearance. I was thinking about using a spoon or small silicone spatula to give lots of curlicues, which I thought might toast up well.