Tomatoes dicer

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by slavaser, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. slavaser

    slavaser

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    Hello.
    I have some question for all professional cooks and cooking hobbyists who spend time in kitchen. I got some experience, of couple of years as a cook (army, hotel). When I worked as cook, I pay my attention for that when we needed for dicing tomatoes, for salat, we never used vegetable dicer machine, we did it manually, because the machine was squeeze them. All rest of vegetables we cut by dicing machine. Recently, I thought about some idea for a product, that may be able to dicing tomatoes gently, without squeeze them and now considering to try to make design of that product. I make my short market research and found that there are not much products(dicers) that can deal with dicing tomatoes, except few, like mandoline slicer, that not exactly dicing, moreover makes long rectangular pieces and Dinamic Dynacube dicer that is little expensive. What I wanted to ask you, as professionals, is do you think that there is need for a product that be able to dice gently tomatoes without squeeze them? Do you use already some kind of product that able to do this kind of job? If yes, what is that product, is it makes satisfying job? I would very grateful to get any piece of information and any opinion. Thanks
     
  2. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not a big fan of gadgets but most tomato slicers and dicers really drive me nuts. The main reason is it is impossible to keep the blades sharp, which is what is required to keep these machines from crushing the tomatoes. These things only really work on hard, under ripe tomatoes, but any fully ripe tomato gets crushed by these machines. Even when they are new, and the blades are super sharp, they will damage very ripe tomatoes. But after a few uses the blades start to dull and then they really don't do the job. Figure out how to keep the blades scalpel sharp and you might have the start of a design.
     
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