tomato sauce acidity

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Joined Mar 1, 2017
We have been using canned San Marzano tomatoes from RD. Each can has a serial number, seals and the crop year and location. We pay about $36 for a case of 6 2550g cans.

Lately I have been playing with adding butter. I know many chefs add carrots also.
Can you upload a good picture of the label front and back?

I make sauce two ways. The first way is to sautee some onions in a butter with a bit of salt in a pan until the onions are just softened. I puree the whole, peeled tomatoes in the can with an immersion blender and add it to the pan and let simmer for about 30 to 40 minutes, adding a bit of water or chicken stock as needed, usually chicken stock. Around the 40 minute mark, I add about a half stick of butter, more if I've used more than a 28oz can of tomatoes. I let that melt in and turn off the heat. Then, I had about 3/4 cup of grated parm or pecorino, whichever I have on hand and stir that in. Then I add fresh, roughly chopped basil. When the pasta is just short of al dente, I'll add it to the pan (usually rigatoni or penne) and finish over low heat. If the sauce has reduced too much, I'll add about a 1/4 cup or less of the pasta water. But, usually the penne or riggis will have some pasta water in them.

The other way is the long version. Sautee onions, meat and garlic in oil. Add the tomatoes and basil and gently simmer.

Cheers!
 
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Joined Nov 2, 2016
When making tomato sauce, how could you eliminate acidity ? I have heard about adding vinegar,
which I don't believe . That sounds like adding more acidity , also some say minute amounts of
sugar brown or white . Any Ideas would be great .
Also how can you thicken sauce, out side of reduction ?

I've done two things that seem to work; first make sure you've removed the seeds from your tomatoes. People skip this, and to me it makes for a bitter, slightly acidic taste. I've also added a small amount of white sugar.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
Sorry. Getting to be a PITA to post images these days.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/wh3jGbhWdxdK6iE56
Ikr? lol

Anyhoo.....sorry, my friend. Those are not true San Marzanos. :-( True San Marzanos are only sold in 28oz cans, not 5lb 10oz cans.

Whoever did the labeling did good job making it look authentic with a Consorzione Certification number and all. But, the can size is the giveaway here. True San Marzanos are never sold in anything but 28oz cans.

But, if they're good....they're good. That's all that matters. :)
 
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Joined May 25, 2015
I get what you are saying, but I can't believe that a huge reputable supplier to the restaurant industry would counterfeit something like this. Maybe just calling them San Marzano, but going so far as to recreate the seals and label and to serialize each can??
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
I get what you are saying, but I can't believe that a huge reputable supplier to the restaurant industry would counterfeit something like this. Maybe just calling them San Marzano, but going so far as to recreate the seals and label and to serialize each can??
It depends. The whole thing can be rather complicated and convoluted at times. What makes it that way is in many instances, Italian growers will grow and can the non-San Marzano tomatoes in Italy and send them to the US without a label. This relieves of them of the burden of abiding by the strict D.O.P. and Consorzio San Marzano regulations. The importer here in the US will slap a label on it that has most, if not all, of the label requirements of true San Marzano tomatoes, including the Consorzio San Marzano certification number/seal and D.O.P. seal. There are no laws in the US that prohibits them from doing that which makes the matter even more tedious. But, they usually have one subtle feature on the label or in the can itself that gives away the truth.

In the case of your tomatoes its three things: 1) The size of the can. True San Marzano's produced and canned under the strict D.O.P. and Consozio San Marzano regulations allow only tin cans and those cans can not be any more or any less than 28oz.; 2) The wording on your can says "San Marzano Tomato of Sarnese - Nocerino Area." A true can of San Marzano's will say only these words in Italian only: "Pomodoro S. Marzano dell’Agro Sarnese Nocerino D.O.P." (Sometimes the word "San" in San Marzano is spelled out rather than just the initial "S"); and 3) The cost. If the cost is too good to be true, with San Marzano's, it is. At around $10 to $15 for a 28oz can of true San Marzano's, if we were to assume they came in a 5lb cans, that can would cost well between $100 and $150 per can.

But, just because they are not grown in the designated plots in the Valley of Sarno does not mean your tomatoes are not good quality. Like I said, if they meet your exacting standards, that's all that matters. For my part, I have no problems with the Cento variety of "not" San Marzano tomatoes. :)
 
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Joined Mar 26, 2019
Has anyone ever heard of K-Sauce Vivo Red? I have a recipe asking for this ingredient but my searches come up empty. Thank you in advance for your responses.
 
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