Toast and Scrambled Eggs: 30 covers Sous vide?

27
1
Joined Feb 4, 2018
I have a microbiology background in a prior life. Pathogens won't grow at 53°C, although they won't all be killed. So if you held at 53 and then let go back to room temperature where they can start growing again, you have a potential problem. The goal is to make sure that nothing grows while they are held. However, holding at 57 would probably work just as well. (Pasteurization at the link you sent was 57°C).

Two servers. I like the idea of ramekins with toast on the side. Another option, that I have seen, might be to serve the eggs family style (in portions of 4), that would hold the heat better than individual portions. The set-up doesn't allow for more than a couple of sets. Seating is family style at long tables.

Thanks for the suggestion!
 
99
65
Joined Jun 28, 2017
Interesting - sounds like you have a good handle on the food safety.

Have you served family style at these meals before? I'm assuming it's a tasting menu format served at a shared table?

My experience is that diners are generally comfortable sharing family style dishes with people in their own party, but that sometimes people are more awkward/hesitant when sharing with strangers (not always, but it's not uncommon).

Are you doing truffle shavings? Getting people who don't know each other to divvy up a luxury ingredient adds to the awkwardness too.
 
5,536
974
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Uh...Why not just buy liquid pasteurized eggs? They've been around for oh, 25 years now. Heath inspectors seem to like them...
 
1,832
539
Joined Aug 15, 2003
Slightly confused. T Tday01 - What is your source for "pathogens don't grow at 53°C"? 53 C = 127 F - aka squarely in the temperature danger zone, no?

You could also pasteurize your whole eggs using your circulator before pooling/holding chilled/cooking a la minute. http://blog.sousvidesupreme.com/2014/08/pasteurized-eggs-sousvide/#sthash.J0hwKq3X.dpbs

Lastly, how complicated is the overall plating for this dish and how many servers will you have? Does it make sense to cook/plate/serve all 25-35 servings at once or would you be better off cooking/plating/serving in a few sets for this course? Or re-conceptualizing the dish to be more friendly to this style of service? A small portion of scrambled eggs on toast seems like it would become unappealingly cold and soggy very quickly. What about doing individual shirred eggs in little jars or covered ramekins in a perf pan set into water heated with your circulator and then serving the toast on the side?

I like how you were confused as to why he/she thought holding eggs at 127F (squarely in the danger zone, no?) wasn't a problem then instantly suggested holding eggs at 135F (squarely in the danger zone, no?) for 2 hours. Gave me a chuckle.

To the OP, the simple fact is that there is not a good way to hold scrambled eggs. The way you get around it is to scramble then a la minute and do them in batches. I.e. cook 10 orders, then 10 more, then 10 more. Scrambling eggs takes little time and assuming you have your mise en place set up correctly, you should be able to scramble/plate 30 orders of eggs in less than 10 minutes, easily.
 
983
212
Joined Jun 23, 2015
Someday,
What would your mise en place be for the eggs? Lets assume 2 eggs per plate.

Just as an aside: when I was in the Army, (shortly after Pasteur discovered germs), the mise in place for eggs for breakfast was
to break six eggs into a bowl place 24 bowls on a sheet pan and continue until the required number were reached. This stack of sheet pans were put on a rolling cart and put in the walk in. Just before service they were wheeled out to the chow line. The cooks would cook two at a time to order on a flat top. As I remember up to 500 men were served in 30 minuets. I was not a cook I was on KP, I broke the eggs.
 
27
1
Joined Feb 4, 2018
Thanks everyone for your help and suggestions so far!!

azenjoys azenjoys : These Feastly events are set-up at long tables and designed for family service. Part of the experience is to meet new people. Usually ~ 50% of the attendees have been to prior events and so explain it to the newcomers. You can get an idea of it here. Our events are here:
I am doing truffle shavings. They are an up-sell and will be shaved individually by the server to those that have purchased them.

someday someday : I understand that this is defined as the danger zone. And I understand why this is so for a full on commercial kitchen where you need a margin of error, and things can end up cooling back to room-temperature and spores start growing again. I wouldn't hold things in the danger zone if I were working in that environment. However, the fact is pathogens do not divide at 53°C. 57°C is the temperature that whole eggs are pasteurized. That means that the cells will be killed, but there will be spores left (you need to sterilize to kill spores).

All academic at this point, as based your (and others) feedback, I am going to do them a la minute. (having now practiced a good few times)

I can't use pasteurized eggs, because actually am planning to use duck eggs!
 
1,832
539
Joined Aug 15, 2003
Thanks everyone for your help and suggestions so far!!


someday someday : I understand that this is defined as the danger zone. And I understand why this is so for a full on commercial kitchen where you need a margin of error, and things can end up cooling back to room-temperature and spores start growing again. I wouldn't hold things in the danger zone if I were working in that environment. However, the fact is pathogens do not divide at 53°C. 57°C is the temperature that whole eggs are pasteurized. That means that the cells will be killed, but there will be spores left (you need to sterilize to kill spores).

I'm not disagreeing with you ( I don't need a lesson in food safety, FYI), I just found it funny that the poster seemed to chastise you for holding eggs in the danger zone, then right after seemingly suggested doing the same exact thing... i.e. "don't hold your eggs at 127 because it is in the danger zone, instead hold them at 135 for 2 hours" Kind of the same thing...

Anyways, that's all I meant. And yes, cooking a la minute is probably the best way to go. Just be organized, have your MEP ready, and
 
315
55
Joined Jan 19, 2014
Pooling eggs is cracking multiple eggs into one container. It doesn't matter that you take the steps to cool it down. The fact of the matter is that one contaminated egg can contaminate the rest. This is why pooling is a no-no. I don't know if this ruling is the same in every state.

Some health agencies enforce a 30 minute time limit for pooling of eggs. I don't know what their stance would be if using pasteurized eggs, and in my experience, the field agent doing the enforcing would probably be flummoxed by the question.

In our area there is no prohibition of pooling of shelled eggs as long as they are stored at the appropriate temp. In fact, this practice is the norm rather than the exception.
 
315
55
Joined Jan 19, 2014
someday someday :

I can't use pasteurized eggs, because actually am planning to use duck eggs![/QUOTE]

You could pasteurize duck eggs if you really wanted to with a sous vide circulator as cheap as the Anova.
 
27
1
Joined Feb 4, 2018
I'll just crack them, hold them at 57 (in the Anova), and then scramble them for service.
 
5,536
974
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Honestly?

It will take you less time to scramble your eggs in a pan in 2 or3 batches than it will take you to vacuum pack and fish it in and out of the bath. The final product will be fluffier and creamier ( when you use cream) if you use the a pan, oh, and butter....

Like I said, sous vide has its place, but for scrambled eggs, it's not an ideal choice.
 
27
1
Joined Feb 4, 2018
Honestly?

It will take you less time to scramble your eggs in a pan in 2 or3 batches than it will take you to vacuum pack and fish it in and out of the bath. The final product will be fluffier and creamier ( when you use cream) if you use the a pan, oh, and butter....

Like I said, sous vide has its place, but for scrambled eggs, it's not an ideal choice.
Was planning to finish in a pan, using cream to finish (which did a great job when I practiced).
(53 or 57 won't cook anything).
 
27
1
Joined Feb 4, 2018
A chef who does similar brunches (albeit with 45 covers) does it and told me it saves him time from the scrambling (which he needs for the other courses). Can't see any harm in it.
 
1,832
539
Joined Aug 15, 2003
....ok. I mean, you do you, and I'm sure they will turn out great. I've just never seen or heard of so much fuss being made about scrambling eggs. It's cooking 101. Not to say that there aren't finesse elements and technique to scrambling eggs, it's just...I dunno, shouldn't be this complicated. It's a layup, not a half court shot.

Good luck though, I really hope it goes well. I'm sure it will. Let us know how it turns out!
 
3,267
697
Joined May 5, 2010
Had the OP told us from the outset that he was using duck eggs, it would have saved a lot of space too.
 
2,509
791
Joined Feb 8, 2009
I prefer poached eggs with English muffins. Over easy over light? What kind of eggs are we using?

I'm happy we're getting to the Egg-Stravaganza part of the conversation. My love of poached eggs is saved for Corned beef hash. Using farm fresh eggs is a must. The yoke is like a dipping sauce. My feeling on English muffins is always wondering why we need different varieties. They have wheat, extra crispy, Sourdough and regular. I always thought if you like extra crispy you just kept it in the toaster longer. This video may help with making poached eggs for the home cook. Another egg dish you don't see around very much is Soft boiled eggs or 3 minute eggs. The last time I had one was in Italy and Greece. They always serve hard boiled eggs for breakfast. That gets old pretty quick, once I started asking for soft boiled eggs the whole dinning room took notice......

 
1,318
847
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Are you married to the truffle scrambled egg menu?

How about a soft boiled truffle egg? You would not have to source any additional ingredients. They can be done in batches on both a stove top or in advance sous vide, depending on your time scheduling. On the stove, they are done in just minutes and can be done in batches and therefore, served all at once. They require no special appliances to prepare other than a heat source, a pot and water. It eliminates all the potential problems with egg pooling. You still get to marry the flavors of the egg with the truffle, if you want. Toast then becomes optional, although I would suggest toast points. Using toast points instead of whole slices just cut your bread requirements literally in half.

This way, you keep positive control of your situation in all respects, reduce your ingredient requirements, greatly simplify your logistics, retain the core flavors of your target menu (egg and truffle), and greatly reduced your risk of drawing the health inspector's attention.

Just a suggestion. :)

Cheers!

Edit: I wrote and posted this before I went back and read Chefbillyb's comment about soft boiled eggs. You know that they say about great minds......lol.
 
Top Bottom