Toast and Scrambled Eggs: 30 covers Sous vide?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by Tday01, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. Tday01

    Tday01

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    Hello All,

    I have only recently started cooking professionally (at Feastly pop-ups in San Francisco). These are a good place to start, because the menu is fixed. The downside is that 25 - 35 covers need to be served at the same time!

    We recently started recipe development for truffled scrambled eggs on toast. I am hoping for some advice on two topics from experienced chefs.
    1. Is there a way to hold 30 pieces of toast for almost simultaneous service?
    2. What is the best way to prep and hold scrambled eggs? I was thinking to pre-cook to the required doneness in a a sous vide (74°C). Shock in an ice bath, and then hold at 55°C for service.
    I'm sure these problems have been solved before.
    TIA
    Tony
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    How did you want to scramble the eggs once they're in a vacuum bag?

    Holding toast is no problem, any hot box or even oven will do the trick
     
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  3. Tday01

    Tday01

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    I was planning to heat at 74°C in the bag, with a massage every 5 minutes. This has worked for me in the past (albeit at small scale). I haven't yet tried calling and reheating to 55°C.
     
  4. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Why the need to hold the eggs?
     
  5. Tday01

    Tday01

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    I have 30 -35 to serve simultaneously, so need a way to reheat / hold without ruining the texture. Their aren't the facilities to cook fro scratch. I could start with uncooked eggs in the bags and then cook them all at once in the bath.
     
  6. jimyra

    jimyra

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    Service for 25-35 is not a big deal. I think you are overthinking the task. Get your self a couple of butane burners and cook on site. https://www.webstaurantstore.com/ch...ane-countertop-range-15-000-btu/47290019.html You can crack the eggs ahead of time and hold the uncooked in a Styrofoam cooler with ice in a ziplock bag. As another on this site often says "It ain't rocket science." Eggs are cheap at this time, buy a case and practice a few times. Good luck!
     
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  7. foodpump

    foodpump

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    As Jimy says, a couple of butane burners will do the trick, or electric hot plates, or portable induction heaters. In any case you still need power on site for your water bath, right?

    Scrambled taste best when you add a good shot of cold cream to stop the cooking process to the eggs, and it works best using a wire whisk, you get very nice fluffy scrambled.

    I dunno, sous vide has its place, but I don't think it's practical for scrambled eggs.
     
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  8. Tday01

    Tday01

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    I Like that idea. I also like the shot of cream to stop from over-shooting.
     
  9. chefross

    chefross

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    Welcome to ChefTalk Tday01.
    I was not aware of what "Feastly pop ups" was until I looked it up.
    I think it's a great idea.
    For you, using a place with no cooking facilities is kinds strange no?
    Don't most Chefs offer up their own kitchens?
    Do the Chef's have to have their kitchens inspected?
    What if someone gets sick?
     
  10. chefross

    chefross

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    jimyra, I thought "pooling eggs" is a big no-no.
    Those purchased bags of eggs with citric acid, although not that tasty, is safer to use no?
     
  11. jimyra

    jimyra

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    You are correct. My thought was that the eggs would be cracked into a bag and stored on ice for immediate transport to the venue. The eggs would be mixed, cooked,and served as a banquet service. I see this as different from mixing a gallon of eggs and using them four ounces at a time over a long period of time. If setting up for a banquet a chef cracks four dozen eggs into a container and puts then in a cooler for an hour or two then cooking them in one batch, is that pooling? I think batch cooking and pooling are different, I stand to be corrected without offense taken. Good discussion.
     
  12. jimyra

    jimyra

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    You are correct. My thought was that the eggs would be cracked into a bag and stored on ice for immediate transport to the venue. The eggs would be mixed, cooked,and served as a banquet service. I see this as different from mixing a gallon of eggs and using them four ounces at a time over a long period of time. If setting up for a banquet a chef cracks four dozen eggs into a container and puts then in a cooler for an hour or two then cooking them in one batch, is that pooling? I think batch cooking and pooling are different, I stand to be corrected without offense taken. Good discussion.
     
  13. jimyra

    jimyra

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    You are correct. My thought was that the eggs would be cracked into a bag and stored on ice for immediate transport to the venue. The eggs would be mixed, cooked,and served as a banquet service. I see this as different from mixing a gallon of eggs and using them four ounces at a time over a long period of time. If setting up for a banquet a chef cracks four dozen eggs into a container and puts then in a cooler for an hour or two then cooking them in one batch, is that pooling? I think batch cooking and pooling are different, I stand to be corrected without offense taken. Good discussion.
     
  14. chefross

    chefross

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    Pooling eggs is cracking multiple eggs into one container. It doesn't matter that you take the steps to cool it down. The fact of the matter is that one contaminated egg can contaminate the rest. This is why pooling is a no-no. I don't know if this ruling is the same in every state.
     
  15. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Some health agencies enforce a 30 minute time limit for pooling of eggs. I don't know what their stance would be if using pasteurized eggs, and in my experience, the field agent doing the enforcing would probably be flummoxed by the question.
     
  16. Requenatelisa12

    Requenatelisa12

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    thank you I was looking for something similar, I'll tell you how
     
  17. Tday01

    Tday01

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    Feastly (optionally) provides event space. The equipment can vary from full commercial kitchen, to "residentially" equipped loft space.
    I will have a stove top, and an oven.
    One suggestion from another chef was to mix the eggs and hold at 53°C, and then cook to order. This overcomes the pooling risk (pathogens don't grow at 53°C), but is too low a temp for the eggs to cook.
    My issue wasn't so much lack of cooking facilities as how to get good quality scrambled eggs on the table at the same time. hence the thoughts about SV.
     
  18. Tday01

    Tday01

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    Feastly also checks out the Chefs and provides insurance. Its a great system for people to start on their own without the cost of starting a restaurant. There is one couple ("Istanbul Modern"), where she was a sous chef at Saison (3 Michelin stars), and he at Mourad (1 star). Great food and they get to get do their own thing. We on the other hand are amateurs ("you can find us under 30KnotGourmet").
     
  19. jimyra

    jimyra

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    I'll try to post this just one time.
    I think the best solution for this post would be for the poster to take the eggs to the venue crack them into a bowl and cook them. I have no idea what a health inspector would say pooled eggs are but they are the boss so I'll go with you all.
    I did find this as a reference:
    "For this evaluation pooling of shelled eggs consists of breaking and combining more than one shell egg in preparation of multiple entre ́es not intended for immediate service."

    https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/ehsnet/docs/jfp_egg_practices_article.pdf

    My interpretation is that the eggs were always kept cool and on ice. Also, they were for one entree. The health inspector is always right.
     
  20. azenjoys

    azenjoys

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    Slightly confused. @Tday01 - What is your source for "pathogens don't grow at 53°C"? 53 C = 127 F - aka squarely in the temperature danger zone, no?

    You could also pasteurize your whole eggs using your circulator before pooling/holding chilled/cooking a la minute. http://blog.sousvidesupreme.com/2014/08/pasteurized-eggs-sousvide/#sthash.J0hwKq3X.dpbs

    Lastly, how complicated is the overall plating for this dish and how many servers will you have? Does it make sense to cook/plate/serve all 25-35 servings at once or would you be better off cooking/plating/serving in a few sets for this course? Or re-conceptualizing the dish to be more friendly to this style of service? A small portion of scrambled eggs on toast seems like it would become unappealingly cold and soggy very quickly. What about doing individual shirred eggs in little jars or covered ramekins in a perf pan set into water heated with your circulator and then serving the toast on the side?
     
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