To leave my first line position, or not to leave....

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by word, Jul 28, 2014.

  1. word

    word

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    Line Cook
    Hey everyone,

    I'm in a bit of a bind. 6 months ago I landed my first spot cooking on a real line. Since then, I've learned, improved, saw other chefs walk out never to return and generally speaking busted my ass 6 days a week for monopoly money.

    I'm thinking about jumping ship though. Promises left unfulfilled (not monetary promises), an alcoholic owner/chef and the realization I've learned everything a luch/weekend dinner joint can teach me has gotten me to this point.

    However, I am worried that jumping ship after 6 months on my first line position will not look well on a résumé.

    Any advice?
     
  2. chefmannydlm

    chefmannydlm

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    Sous Chef
    From what I have understood, it is not uncommon to have a very transitory beginning to your career. This is especially true if this establishment is not exactly fine dinning. Cooks come and go, especially if you feel that you have 1) learned and gained all that you will out of this particular job and 2) you feel you are in a situation that is not good for you personally (bad boss/job situation).  I would say to take a look and see what you can find.  If someone is willing to hire you on and you feel like you would be in a better situation, then take it.  I only think jumping ship often begins to look bad later in your career.
     
  3. grande

    grande

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    I agree with chef manny, look around to find something before you leave; don't just quit without a new job. Plan on spending at least a year or two at your new place, though.
     
  4. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Professional Chef
    Six more months would bring you up to a year and will look much better on your resume, especially if it is your first job in the field. Jumping ship after six months doesn't look as significant if it is in the company of a couple of longer employment jobs, by itself it kind of stands out. Gives interviewers a pause and makes them wonder if it was the job or you that was the problem. People will wonder if you cut and run when the going gets tough. While it may not be pleasurable, I would stay for six more months. The time will fly by and while you may not learn much new you can still be honing and improving your basic core skills.