Tiramisu

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by aldente, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. aldente

    aldente

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    I have been wanting to make this for years but to be honest, I have been scared.  I was told it is a difficult desert to prepare.

    I would like to attempt it, however I cannot use liquor.  Is there a non-alcoholic substitute for the Marsala?

    Here is what I have found as an ingredient list:

    1 cup sugar
    1/2 cup sweet Marsala wine
    6 egg yolks
    1 pound
    Mascarpone cheese, room temperature
    1-1/2 cups hot water
    5 teaspoons instant coffee powder
    1/2 cup coffee-flavored liqueur
    Approximately 12 ounces
    ladyfingers (Savoiardi)
    Unsweetened cocoa for dusting cake
    1 ounce semi-sweet chocolate, grated  (optional)
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You can use fruit juice or sweetened coffee (perhaps flavored with an extract such as almond) instead of wine.

    More generally, it's not a particularly difficult dessert to make as much as it's complicated.  That is, there are a lot of steps -- none of them difficult -- and a lot of assembly. Take your time, clean up and put away between steps so your counter doesn't get too crowded, and you'll be just fine. 

    For what it's worth, the "clean as you go" thing is one of the keys to good cooking.  Most good cooks keep their station clean and organized.   If working from mise en place in a well-organized space isn't already part of your routine, you'll be surprised at what a difference it makes in your timing, the quality of the final output and how much it "de-stresses" the cooking process, and how much fun you have cooking. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  3. aldente

    aldente

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    Hey thanks BDL

    That gives me some encouragement for attempting this dessert.

    Oh absolutely I am in complete agreement with you on "clean as you go".

    Thanks for the alternatives to the liquor!
     
  4. ordo

    ordo

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    You can flambée on advance the Marsala and the liquor until the alcohol evaporates.

    Of course, you know that instant coffee is not the same as espresso or filtered coffee.
     
  5. aldente

    aldente

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    Ah.. thank you for pointing out the instant coffee.  I would not probably use that.
     
  6. siduri

    siduri

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    I've almost never had tiramisu with alcohol  here in Rome, and that's surprising because almost all cakes have some liqueur. 

    They dunk the lady fingers into plain espresso coffee (no don't use instant, it doesn't taste as good at all) and line the dish.    Most people use pavesini, a thin ladyfinger kind of commercial cookie, but some use lady fingers. But they;re wet through with coffee.  You can water down the espresso a little if you want. 

    Eggs and sugar are beaten together and mixed with the mascarpone. 

    A layer of lady fingers (completely soaked in espresso)

    a layer of mascarpone, a good inch thick

    another of lady fingers

    anotehr of mascarpone

    and eithyer plain unsweetened cocoa sifted on top or grated dark semisweet chocolate on top

    I'm not sure what region of Italy tiramisu originated from - this is how it's made in Rome.  No liqueur.  Nothing else. Maybe other regions have marsala or something.  One of the easiest dishes to make. 

    Personally i prefer to make an italian meringue with egg whites and boiling sugar syrup and mix that with the mascarpone.  It comes out much softer. 
     
  7. aldente

    aldente

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    Siduri

    This sounds Awesome!  I am now inspired again to go make this!
     
  8. french fries

    french fries

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    Siduri, your posts are always incredibly inspiring. I thought I knew how to make Tiramisu before I read this thread. Thank you!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  9. indygal

    indygal

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    Thank you for that, BDL.  My brother laughs at me for cleaning up as I go.   He also gets peeved with me because as soon as I can, I transfer leftovers to smaller containers, giving me more space in the fridge.   Now when HE cooks, he has a gofer, ME.  So he never really feels the "pinch" of a small kitchen.
     
  10. siduri

    siduri

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    Many good cooks clean up as they go.  One, at least doesn't.

    I actually usually have stuff piled up around me wherever I'm working, whether on a paper for a conference, or a piece of calligraphy, or cooking...  or anything.  It's not intentional. It just is. 

    I usually have three things going on at once.  The only time i couldn't do that was during menopause - then, like my husband or most men i know, i could only do one thing at a time, and would burn the sauce because i was answering the phone!

    And i find it IMMENSELY irritating when some well-meaning person starts washing things as i cook.  If i finished chopping the onions it doesn;t mean i don;t want to use the knife to smash the garlic.  I want to find it right where i left it!  It saves time, and it saves washing.    And at the end, it's faster to clean up once than to have to keep cleaning up all through the cooking process. 

    I guess the difference is also between the person who gets home from work late with some bags of shopping, rips them open and starts cooking with the shopping still on the kitchen chairs and gets a (pretty amazing) dinner on the table in half an hour (albeit with a kitchen that looks like a cyclone struck it) and someone who has lots of time to prepare things and go at an even pace.  But i do it that way even when i do have time. 

    We all have our own style of working, i guess.  I don;t say it would be good in a professional kitchen - but i luckily don;t have to care about that. 
     
  11. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Good Afternoon,

    Tiramisù translates to: Pick Me Up or Energize.

    The Marsala wine Mascarpone cream spiked with Espresso dessert originated in Milan, Lombardia.

    Have nice Sunday.

    Margcata.
     
  12. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Don't most people already know the English translation for tiramisu?
     
  13. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I make almost same way only I add some Kahlua. or coffee  liquor and a touch of Marsala. I have worked in many places that mix a little cream cheese ino mascapone so it freezes better and does not water out when thawed.The commercial cream cheese has bult in stabilyzers.
     
  14. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    No it did not originate in Milan.  It was invented in El Touga, Treviso.
     
  15. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Thanks for the info, Kuan.

    Sometimes, I think we would all be led astray by info posted by others here...
     
  16. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Good Evening,

    According to www.kitchenproject.com Tiramisù derived during 1723, in Siena as the dessert to be served to Cosimo III and the French King. Another point this website mentions is that because Lady Fingers do not contain yeast, they were very popular for Orthodox Jewish People at Passover celebrations.

    Now, www.wikipedia.com states there are two views; one is Siena and another Savoiardi, Savoy, France !  It is related to the Zuppa di Inglese.

    Thus, we can state that it is very popular in Milan, Lombardia as there are uncountable cafés dedicated to its preparation;  as well as Treviso and Venecia, in Veneto.

    Perhaps, the next time I am in Milan, or Veneto, I shall go over to the Government´s Agricultural Board, and see what they say.

    Have nice Sunday.

    Margcata.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2012
  17. siduri

    siduri

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    A quick google search in italian led to several hypotheses, in the 1500s or 1600s  in Siena, in Tuscany (generically) and 1960 in the restaurant "El Toula"

    Treviso in 1960 is the conclusion given in the the wikipedia article in italian.  This gives an apparently scholarly story of its history - http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiramisù - replete with footnotes.  (This doesn't mean it's true of course, but it is quite convincing).  But it says that there is no evidence for any recipe of this desert before 1960 (of course, there could be one and it's not been found) and that while mascarpone,its principle ingredient, is from Lombardy originally and Treviso is in Veneto,  by the 60s mascarpone was shipped everywhere.  The author says that the original had no alcohol, just coffee, eggs, sugar, ladyfingers (savoiardi) and mascarpone. 

    Alcohol, being a depressant, unlike coffee, a stimulant, would make it a "buttamigiu'"

    But of course, you should make it however you like it best. 
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2012
  18. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Of course, according to Giuseppe Maffioli, of the Italian Academy, the " origini " dates back to Duke Cosimo de Medici in Siena, and he had made a trip to Treviso and in his honor,

    Ristorante Le Beccherie ( Treviso ) prepared it for him.

    However, this does not confirm that he had tried this dessert before, with his own Chef / Cooks.

    This was documented on website:  www.lifeinitaly.com ( in both Italian and English ).

    So, there are several viewspoints, and none are completely clear.

    Have nice Sunday.

    Margcata.
     
  19. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I will disagree with all those "websites" you cite.  Those internet sources are just a bunch wannabes who think they know it all.

    My source is Bo Friberg's book, The New Professional Pastry Chef.

    Anyway the OP asked a specific question about leaving the liquor out of Tiramisu.
     
  20. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Bo Friberg was a great teacher, I had him for pastry at CCA in 1980.