Tipping on gross or net sales of bill

Discussion in 'Restaurant Reviews' started by nicko, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. Net Sales (Why would I tip on taxes)

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  2. Gross Sales (I am a high roller and I tip on the taxed amount)

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  1. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    When you tip do you tip on the net sales (amount before tax) or the amount after tax? There was an old thread about this from 2006 but only two replies. I am resurrecting this topic to find out what everyone does. We constantly have a discussion about this when we go out with friends.
     
  2. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Net. I usually double the tax, unless I'm at a regular haunt, then I overtip a little.
     
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  3. gourmetm

    gourmetm

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    20% of the net. Like thetincook, I overtip if at a reg. haunt.
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I must be the only one too lazy to do the math.

    I use 20% as my base tip, increasing or decreasing as the case may be. But I base it on the total, and, in most cases, round up.

    For instance, if the total (gross) bill is $57, 20% would be $11.40. For satisfactory but not exceptional service I would leave 12 bucks on the table.

    Here in Kentucky the tax is 6%. So, on the above example, the net would be $53.58. Take 20% of that and the tip is $10.67---which results in an actual tip of $11. I'm not going to sit there playing accountent over a lousy buck.

    Do the rest of you really do it differently? I mean, whether figured on the net or the gross, if the tip comes out to odd change to you actually leave the exact amount (in my example, $11.40) for the server?

    I also never put the tip on plastic. Stems from my days as a server, when how much I actually made was something between me and the IRS.
     
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  5. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    15-20% (depending on the service with exceptions on a slow kitchen) on the net bill, including alcohol.  My husband use to figure it with the out the booze until I explained that the wait staff has to share their tips with the bar, that is correct right?  I mean about sharing the tip? 
     
  6. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I am still scratching my head as to why it is now 20%. Growing up as a kid it was always 15%. To me there is the following types of service:
    • Ok service - 10% - server showed up served your food but did not do anything exceptional.
    • Good service - 15% - server was attentive, looked for opportunities to go above and beyond. 
    • Excellent service - 20%+ - server truly went above and beyond. Much attention to details. 
    I have been to little burger joints and had a great server and tipped 30% without even blinking. On the other hand I have been to high end restaurants where the server made me feel like they were doing me a favor and I will only leave 15% and even that I don't feel is deserved.

    To me tip on the net it is fair to both.
     
  7. abefroman

    abefroman

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    15% + or - depending on service, after alcohol but before tax.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2011
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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  9. lance dean

    lance dean

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    don't forget to tip on the total before any discounts or coupons, the servers get taxed on their net sales before any discounts.

    From wikipedia.com:

    Tipping is customary in restaurants having traditional table service. As tipped employees generally qualify for a lower statutory minimum wage  from the employer, tips in some states constitute the majority of the income for tipped workers such as wait staff. While opinions vary, Fodor's  suggests that tipping wait staff  15% of the bill (before tax) is considered standard for adequate service, or up to 20% for excellent service
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I tip on the total amount of the bill.  I don't bother with the "pre tax" amount.  When it comes down to it, unless you have spent hundreds on the meal whether you tip pre tax or post tax really makes very little difference (15% of 5-6%).  As for the amount I usually tip anywhere from 15-20% depending on the service, although poor service will see less of a tip.
     
  11. barbara6711

    barbara6711

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    I always tip double the taxes.  In our area, 9 1/2% is common for taxes.  This is given for standard service.  My husband says this means his drink is filled everytime he ask.  If the server anticipates his needs this is excelent service and deserves something extra.  We do tip on plastic sometimes and we do tell the manager when our server deserves the extra money.
     
  12. colin

    colin

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    15% on the net as the absolute minimum, even if service was lackluster -- it's how the server makes a living.  Usually 18-20%.  

    Regular hangouts 20%; inexpensive places like diners, 20-25%.  

    All plastic, I'm afraid.  I've just about stopped carrying cash.  
     
  13. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I don't think it matters whether it is on the plastic or cash. The server has the obligation to report their income taxes. 
     
  14. nadeest

    nadeest

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    I generally tip about 15 - 20% on the total bill.  Exceptional service gets more.
     
  15. kieron19

    kieron19

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    Neither....

    I start at $00 (£00)

    and if the greeting is good i add an appropriate amount on normally (£2) $4

    then the better or more i enjoy service i will keep adding an amount onto this. if something happens or does something i don't like i take some £/$ off.

    On a 2 course meal lasting around 2 hours costing around $100 (£50) i would usually tip between $15 (£7) and $45 (£20) if its bad service i usually tip around £0.50p or $1 this being an insult to staff.

    As a waiter myself the more someone tips the better the service was, the less the tip i think i could have done better.
     
  16. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    We started leaving the tip in cash so that the server has instant cash in their pocket. 

    It seemed to me that the owner/operator/manager maybe didn’t give them

    their fair share at the end of their shift from the till if we left our gratuity on the plastic. 

    Maybe someone can shed some light on that one for me. 

    This place that we use to go to added the tip on after we had written a zero on our ticket and left it as cash, twice!  We don’t go there anymore.
     
  17. lennyd

    lennyd

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    Wow that's terrible.

    Not how you tip, but how far the Dollar has fallen in value :)

    I also consider the level of service I have received, and though having to rely on tips for my income in the past as well I do not over tip bad service (that is just wrong), will over tip considerably for service that excels, and do not feel bad for a server that may have chosen the wrong career path and receives low tips due to poor service. There are just certain individuals who do not belong to be working with people, and I do not feel obligated to leave them any certain amount of money for trying to make me as miserable as they are. Those who do just the opposite deserve the difference added on top though.

    Typically  though I almost always immediately figure what 15% is in my head (sorry to those who find it tough, but just comes to me for some reason, and more a curse than gift) and then consider the experience when deciding, One thing I do dislike is a reduced tip due to things beyond a servers control like sub standard or poor food, dirty establishment, or even under staffing. I know many will reduce for those things and I honestly do feel the urge, but if the server does it right I am not comfortable making them take the hit for it etc. and will just not return.

    Now there are times where 15% or 20% does not work for me and I have left a tip near or similar to the bill. I say this because I see people leaving change on the table when they get good service, and take up a table, but end up with a $6 bill from a breakfast special or something similar. I just do not find it right to leave .90 for a tip just because you went with the special as the server still had to service you etc. Maybe it is just me but I find I have to leave at least a few dollars.

    Maybe I put too much value on the experience, but I really do believe that pretty much anyone can take your order and throw your food on the table, but those who make it a pleasant experience and leave you wanting for nothing really deserve to be rewarded for it, and those who do not put in that same effort need to handled accordingly.

    Oh and never ever never tip on tax. :)
     
  18. leeniek

    leeniek

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    Here our tax is about 15% so I add a few dollars to whatever the tax comes up to.
     
  19. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    We have a unique tax structure in the area. If you dine with-in our city limits, the tax on food is 10% and every where else is between 5 and 7%. Because of this we find it necessary to be very aware where the place we are eating at is located. Regarding the net or gross, it is normally off the net and when using coupons or discount cards we tip off the net before the discount was applied.
     
  20. durangojo

    durangojo

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    some customers just tip on the food amount...not the wine or the tax....we are outside the city limits here and our tax is 3% less than  in town...the resort/luxury tax at the ski mountain is 10%, so people that tip on the taxed amount really get fleeced.....if you are staying at the resort and are eating the majority of your meals out, it adds up.....for me, the tip should be based on food and service and tipping on the taxed amount may not be much unless you are with a large party. i just do 20% of the food cost...i feel that i am already paying an upcharge on wine....but as i said, it depends on the size of the party...if it's 2, it's not enough to worry about..if it's 8 is can be...guess it also depends if your a big roller!

    joey