Thoughts on this kitchen layout / equipment schedule

402
212
Joined Apr 25, 2017
We are working on the kitchen(s) layout with our equipment supply place, mechanical engineer, and architect - but I would also like to hear from people who work in them daily, and may see something we are not thinking of. Especially people who have / had food trucks or other kitchen renters (catering, etc).

Please remember this is not a restaurant, so there are not the normal stations you might expect to see. The kitchen on the top is the rental side.

Layout test.png

1 Double oven
1b Single Oven
2 6 burner, 24" griddle Stove
2b 6 burner, 24" griddle Stove
3 Fryer
4 Hood
5 30 qt Mixer
6 Sheeter
7 Walk In Cooler
8 Chest Freezer
9 Hand Washing Sink
10 Water Heater
11 Prep Sink
12 3 Bay Sink
13 Under counter Dishwasher
14 Ice Machine
15 Refrigeration area / plug
16 Storage Cage w / Shelves
17 Stainless Table
18 Shelves
19 Mop Sink
 
5,551
991
Joined Oct 10, 2005
That’s a big kitchen!

Why are you using separate reach in coolers instead of a walk in for separate storage? Each separate unit will pump out a lot of heat, and combined they will consume more power than one single 3 hp compressor. You can have lock up cages in the walk in. But come August, those 6 fridges will heat up your kitchen and make it noisier than all-get-out.

Most chefs have a hate/hate relationship with chest freezers. Must have something to do with (deleted) crashing down on your neck just as you’re extracting that last case of bacon...

Will you be having your flour and sugar bins on castors (cambros) under the s/s prep table? If you are using this table to scale your ingredients, you will need more room. Most table top shelters fold up, but even then they gobble up 4’ of counter space folded. Overhead shelves for smaller ingredients would be practical too.

Mount your under counter d/w on a small table to bring up to counter height. Your back will thank you.
 
402
212
Joined Apr 25, 2017
That’s a big kitchen!

It is, and yet there are still times I am afraid it is not big enough! I will be glad to be past this stage - I think!

Why are you using separate reach in coolers instead of a walk in for separate storage? Each separate unit will pump out a lot of heat, and combined they will consume more power than one single 3 hp compressor. You can have lock up cages in the walk in. But come August, those 6 fridges will heat up your kitchen and make it noisier than all-get-out.

This is something we have gone back and forth on having had the same thoughts. We researched and visited the rental kitchens we could get to and talked to many, many renters (both happy where they are and those now on our wait list) and the number one complaint we have heard was sharing a walk in. The kitchen we liked best (with several renters there for over 5 years) had this set up and it was not too noisy or hot. There will be a wall between the second row and the open part of the kitchen, and the entire building will be heavily insulated and cooled with geothermal AC.

We are only providing the space and plugs, the renters are responsible for their own units if they want one, and there is a charge for electricity if they do. Quite a few people don't want refrigeration, and they can use the floor space for more storage if they want.

One advantage to the non-retail kitchen is that the hot equipment won't be on all the time - usually the ovens get the most work. For the food trucks, the space is most often for DHEC, storage, dishes, and water emptying / refilling and not much actual cooking.

Most chefs have a hate/hate relationship with chest freezers. Must have something to do with (deleted) crashing down on your neck just as you’re extracting that last case of bacon...

Here too - we haven't made up our minds completely on this - we do like the efficiency but... And actually this was very helpful because I've just realized the second unit (which is a reach in) was left off the plan!

Will you be having your flour and sugar bins on castors (cambros) under the s/s prep table? If you are using this table to scale your ingredients, you will need more room. Most table top shelters fold up, but even then they gobble up 4’ of counter space folded. Overhead shelves for smaller ingredients would be practical too.

Good catch - the sheeter needs to be moved to the table on the back wall so the table by the mixer is free. We do have overhead shelves on the walls and some hanging utensil racks over the center tables, but I wasn't sure how to put them on the plan.

Mount your under counter d/w on a small table to bring up to counter height. Your back will thank you.

That is a good idea!

Thank you for your time and thoughts!
 
402
212
Joined Apr 25, 2017
A little more info about the operation might help with suggestions. The way I work is with separate production and finishing kitchens so I think about the flow of materials, waste, movement of people etc. Where ingredients come in, how they are processed with meat and veg/salad areas, storage, cooking processes, chilling etc then how prepared products stored, regenerated etc.

Just as an example, my meat prep areas are always closest to the entry and exit points. Meat comes in, gets prepped and stored, waste goes out. Its not moving from chiller to chiller or station to station. For veg, again a dedicated area with twin sinks. And a handwash right next to the cooking area and central to the prep stations.

You are right, it is hard to know what is needed if you don't know what we are doing.

The non-rental side is mainly a production kitchen for wholesale products. The products vary from frozen ready-to-bake items, to local dairy (soft cheeses), and canned goods. We do off site sales 2 days a week and some catering, but that is really just PR for the wholesale.

We tend to divide our process by the day. We use a lot of local ingredients, so each week begins with a couple of days prepping whatever is in season and making the bases for whatever will be made that week. The second half of the week is spent making and packaging the final product.

The center open area is mostly for the speed racks that will be moved from work station to walk in, and the reverse.

The sinks are all along the wet wall due to construction limitations. Since most of the prep is done in large batches at once, it should work pretty well.

Thank you for the feedback and question!
 
984
212
Joined Jun 23, 2015
I see no doors? If you have an engineer the drawings should be much better and include utilities etc. Is the hand wash sink in the kitchen as required? Do you need the ovens in the six burner stove? Have fun and good luck with your project.
 
984
212
Joined Jun 23, 2015
I see no doors? If you have an engineer the drawings should be much better and include utilities etc. Is the hand wash sink in the kitchen as required? Do you need the ovens in the six burner stove? Have fun and good luck with your project.
 
402
212
Joined Apr 25, 2017
I see no doors? If you have an engineer the drawings should be much better and include utilities etc. Is the hand wash sink in the kitchen as required? Do you need the ovens in the six burner stove? Have fun and good luck with your project.

This is just a preliminary sketch for placement before the engineer does the detailed, expensive drawing. All of the squares marked 9 are hand washing sinks.

Thanks, all good luck is welcome!
 
Last edited:
402
212
Joined Apr 25, 2017
The engineer did say we may be able to make a utility closet in the lobby area, so they might be put in there if it works out.
 
5,551
991
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Meh, keep the water heaters as close as possible to the d/washer and sinks, makes more sense. Also, depending on local code they may need a drip pan tied into a floor drain, which is easier and cheaper to do in the kitchen than lobby area.
 
Top Bottom