This review is the wierdest one yet....

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by foodpump, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. foodpump

    foodpump

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  2. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Complaining that the pastry crust is too crispy? For real? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif
     
  3. chefedb

    chefedb

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    We all know that most of the dining out public are nuts, but they pay our salaries and keep us employed.  Just smile and go to the bank.
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Seems to me that a critic should at least be able to write without grammatical errors.

    As a reporter she really sucks. The whole top of her review consists of guesses and suppositions. Why didn't she just call you and ask?

    And this harping on the 2-person minimum sounds as if she felt she had to have something wrong, so choose that one.

    But the best is how she glowingly describes the chicken pot pie, and then says she didn't like it.

    All in all, as a review, I'd rate it no more than 4 on a 10 point scale. But at least she recommended your place, for whatever that's worth.
     
  5. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Interesting reading, to say the least. The very least. Customer seems a bit hung-up on "too sweet". Uhhhh...

    Which actually got me thinking about the subjectivity of dining out, or, anything rooted in creative expression, like a movie, music, etc.  Is it not difficult to appease the appetite, both literally and figuratively, of the public? What is good for one may not be so for another. We all like different toppings on pizza, so how could one pizza be suitable for the masses? It simply can not be done. Does it not then figure that publicly critiquing a venue may not be in everybody's best interest? Especially, I need to add, everyone with an opinion feels that they can write adequately enough to express their likes/dislikes without being skewed by their own preferences?

    I guess I am just wondering how the meatloaf I make compares to the meatloaf your mom makes; mom, afterall, is the reigning queen of comfort food. And since you grew up, hopefully, liking mom's creation, is it fair to lambast mine?
     
  6. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Well.... both my wife and I read it, and we were both cracking up before we got to the end.

    So yes, I am happy that the guest enjoyed him/herself, and am happy and grateful that my business is "recommended".

    But it still takes a lot of mental coaxing and discipline to google my business every couple of weeks to see what's being said.
     
  7. foodpump

    foodpump

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    BTW, JIm, regarding "Too sweet".

    After working in Singapore for 4 years, cooking and baking for my wif'e's family and friends, and during casual convestions with people of Chinese backgrounds, I still am uncertain about the phrase "Too sweet". 

    I'm pretty sure it is a knee-jerk reaction when asked to describe any western pastry. "Too sweet" always comes first, followed by thoughts on texture, appearance, taste, etc.  Certainly, sugar is no stranger in the Chinese kitchen or bakery, and I've sampled many an ethnic item that put sweaters on my teeth.

    Well we've had 4 (four) glorious days of sunshine, now it's back to grey skies.
     
  8. thetincook

    thetincook

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    I've heard the too sweet thing mostly about chocolates lately. Something about how the excess sweetness masks the complexity etc.

    Hey, I'd take a date to your place based on that review. I'll have to remember to ask for my pot pie extra soggy ;) Really liking your chocolate ID sheet. All samplers should have those.

    OT,- Are you putting your dipped chocolates on transfer sheets after dipping? I've never seen that technique before.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  9. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Yeah, I do some chocolates directly on whole transfer sheets, and for about 3 varities  I cut up the sheets into 1" squares and stick them on.  Gotta have good light for the individual transfer sheet squares though, if you don't, you end up with the transfers backwards. 

    You don't know how to silver-solder by any chance?  Ordered a bunch of dipping forks in from Matfer.  The welds broke on three of them after dipping like two chocolates. Straining a 20- kg vat of couverture to get the tines of a (deleted) fork isn't my idea of time well spent.  But three times?, well.... Needless to say I'm stuck with a box of junk and down to one fork.
     
  10. thetincook

    thetincook

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    I do, but you gotta be careful what solder you use. Some of the alloys have toxic metals. You'll want one that's used for potable water lines.
     
  11. panini

    panini

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    pump,

      I think it was a great review. Anyone reading would not make it to the negetive critiques. All the wondering and guessing. I can't recall the item but she yoyo'd. Was it good or bad?

    I have to believe this is a very young person. She came to your place with her mom and I read another review of a high tea where she was with her dad. She sort of writes like a person who is not old enough to drive." We got a piece of paper with pictures on it!!"  Now in your shop she could'nt stand the thought of whipped cream and at the other review the whipped cream was so good she finished it all. How do you get your chocolate sickening sweet? I would like the recipe.

    I have to agree with her on one thing though. Whenever I'm feeling a little blue or unloved I head out alone to find a high tea.

    I enjoyed reading and seeing your store.

    pan
     
  12. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Thanks Pan.

    Yeah, all in all, it was good.  The photos were decent, and inspite of the wishy-washy stuff,my place was recomended.  I have to say though, both my wife and I cracked up when we read it.

    I'm, very uh, "racist' when it comes to chocolate.  Every one in this town uses Belgian, I use Swiss.  The milk choc.I use is a good one, 38% cocoa solids, 34% cocoa butter--not at all 'too sweet".....
     
  13. left4bread

    left4bread

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    Wow, looks awesome!

    I've never been to "high tea", but isn't it supposed to be a social experience?  Not single service?

    Anyways, the photos looked ...incredible.

    I'd make it a point/go out of my way for high tea there (if I ever make it up there).

    Maybe I should plan a day trip...
     
  14. blueicus

    blueicus

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    I believe the kind of tea service referred to here is afternoon tea, high tea is a meal eaten later
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  15. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Probably, but I'm not very English.  

    From what I understand there is a "high tea" and a "low tea", and my faux pas is to call my "high tea" as such, when it really is a "low tea".

    See, "low tea" was, at one time, served on low tables, with all manner of dainty items; whereas "high tea" was served on high tables, items much heartier and could be eaten while standing.     
     
  16. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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  17. allium

    allium

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    The general public, foodies included, doesn't know squat. Yelp reviews drive me insane. You see respected breweries rated poorly because of their food (wtf?). The main thing to be learned from reading reviews is that people care a lot more about service than the food.
     
  18. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Many line cooks here in Florida have a High Tea daily .  They smoke grass and have an iced one.